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  • 201.
    Katona, Gergely
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Ida
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rodilla, Helena
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Garcia-Bonete, Maria-Jose
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Duelli, Annette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Weixiao Y
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bourenkov, Gleb
    DESY, European Mol Biol Lab Hamburg Outstn, Germany.
    Vukusic, Josip
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Schneider, Thomas
    DESY, European Mol Biol Lab Hamburg Outstn, Germany.
    Stake, Jan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bayesian analysis of non-thermal structural changes induced by terahertz radiation in protein crystals2016In: 2016 41ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INFRARED, MILLIMETER, AND TERAHERTZ WAVES (IRMMW-THZ), IEEE conference proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have periodically (25ms on - 25ms off) illuminated lysozyme crystals with 0.4 THz radiation and simultaneously monitored their X-ray diffraction intensity in order to study non-thermal structural changes in the protein. In this work we analyze the X-ray scaled and unmerged diffraction intensity observations using a multivariate Bayesian model in order to improve the accuracy of the intensity estimates. The diffraction intensity pairs of the illuminated and non-illuminated state show a predominantly positive correlation. The correlation decreases with increasing resolution suggesting that finer slicing and faster sampling of the rocking curve may further improve the accuracy and effect size of structure factor amplitude differences, making the interpretation of structural changes more straightforward. The improved analysis retains the most important structural features described previously (in helix 3) and provide addition details about the B-factor changes close to the substrate binding site.

  • 202.
    Khrennikov, Andrei
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Matematik.
    Quantum equilibria for macroscopic systems2006In: Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General, ISSN 0305-4470, Vol. 39, p. 8461-8475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We found quantum equilibria for macroscopic systems.

  • 203.
    Kilander, Agnes
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Yeast as a Model Organism in Epigenetic Research; Altered Phenotype Caused by Food Components: A Pre-Study with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 77642012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The epigenetic state of individuals is most relevant for health and disease prevention. Epigenetics are modifications (such as methylation or acetylation) of DNA and chromatin with no changes in the DNA sequence, which affects the phenotype. Nutrient deficiency and bioactive food components are examples of factors affecting the epigenetic state. The aim of present thesis work was to investigate if the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to find food components that alter the epigenome. S. cerevisiae is widely used as a model organism because of the high conservation in many genes between yeast and humans. S. cerevisiae CBS 7764 was cultivated in zinc deficiency or with resveratrol (grape polyphenol), and the death rate in H2O2 after recovery in full media/without resveratrol was determined. Zinc deficiency and resveratrol have previously been shown to have epigenetic effects. An altered sensitivity against oxidative stress was indicated as a change in the epigenome. Both zinc deficiency and resveratrol treatment were shown to give an increased sensitivity against H2O2 compared with the control culture. The change in the zinc deficiency culture was shown to be reversible, which is indicative of epigenetic modulation and not mutations. This indicates that S. cerevisiae can be used as a model organism to find food components with epigenetic effects, but the method needs further evaluation.

  • 204.
    Kirsch, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hedin-Dahlström, Jimmy
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Henschel, Henning
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Whitcombe, Michael J
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Molecularly imprinted polymer catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction2009In: Journal of Molecular Catalysis B: Enzymatic, ISSN 1381-1177, E-ISSN 1873-3158, Vol. 58, no 1-4, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of synthetic polymers were designed and synthesized for enhancing the rate of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of 1,3-butadiene carbamic acid benzyl ester (11) and N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (2), to yield the corresponding endo- (3) and exo- (4) reaction products. Putative transition state analogues (TSAs) for the endo- (5) and exo- (6) reaction pathways were used as templates for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted methacrylic acid (MAA)-divinylbenzene (DVB) copolymers. The polymer system utilized was selected based upon a series of (1)H NMR studies of complex formation between template and a functional monomer analogue (K(d) (app) approximate to 70 mM, d(8)-toluene, 293 K). Batch binding studies revealed that the imprinted polymers were selective for the TSA corresponding to the template used in the polymer synthesis. Studies on the influence of the polymers on the catalysis of the reaction of 1 and 2 demonstrated a 20-fold enhancement of the rate of the reaction relative to the solution reaction. A surprising temperature dependence of the reaction of 1 and 2 in the presence of the polymers was observed, which provides support for the role of template-functional monomer complexes in the catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction.

  • 205.
    Kitaguchi, Yuya
    et al.
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Habuka, Satoru
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Okuyama, Hiroshi
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Hatta, Shinichiro
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Aruga, Tetsuya
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Frederiksen, Thomas
    Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Spain ; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Spain.
    Paulsson, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Ueba, Hiromu
    University of Toyama, Japan.
    Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring2015In: Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, ISSN 2190-4286, Vol. 6, p. 2088-2095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices.

  • 206. Knutsson, M
    et al.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Novel chiral recognition elements for molecularly imprinted polymer preparation1998In: Journal of Molecular Recognition, Vol. 11, p. 87-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Knutsson, Malin
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Novel recognition elements for improved molecularly imprinted polymer stereoselectivity1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Kozarcanin, Huda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    The Lectin Pathway of Complement is Triggered by Activated Platelets2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 209.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Arrhenius Lab, S-10691 Stockholm.
    Bergström, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Arrhenius Lab, S-10691 Stockholm.
    Ohlson, Sten
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Arrhenius Lab, S-10691 Stockholm.
    Combining weak affinity chromatography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular simulations in carbohydrate-lysozyme interaction studies.2012In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 10, no 15, p. 3019-3032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By examining the interactions between the protein hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) and commercially available and chemically synthesized carbohydrate ligands using a combination of weak affinity chromatography (WAC), NMR spectroscopy and molecular simulations, we report on new affinity data as well as a detailed binding model for the HEWL protein. The equilibrium dissociation constants of the ligands were obtained by WAC but also by NMR spectroscopy, which agreed well. The structures of two HEWL-disaccharide complexes in solution were deduced by NMR spectroscopy using (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) effects and transferred (1)H,(1)H-NOESY experiments, relaxation-matrix calculations, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. In solution the two disaccharides β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-D-GlcpNAc-OMe and β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcpNAc-OMe bind to the B and C sites of HEWL in a syn-conformation at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding and CH/π-interactions form the basis of the protein-ligand complexes in a way characteristic of carbohydrate-protein interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules of both the apo-form of the protein and a ligand-protein complex showed structural change compared to a crystal structure of the protein. The flexibility of HEWL as indicated by a residue-based root-mean-square deviation analysis indicated similarities overall, with some residue specific differences, inter alia, for Arg61 that is situated prior to a flexible loop. The Arg61 flexibility was notably larger in the ligand-complexed form of HEWL. N,N'-Diacetylchitobiose has previously been observed to bind to HEWL at the B and C sites in water solution based on (1)H NMR chemical shift changes in the protein whereas the disaccharide binds at either the B and C sites or the C and D sites in different crystal complexes. The present study thus highlights that protein-ligand complexes may vary notably between the solution and solid states, underscoring the importance of targeting the pertinent binding site(s) for inhibition of protein activity and the advantages of combining different techniques in a screening process.

  • 210.
    Lard, Mercy
    et al.
    Lund University.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Generosi, Johanna
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linke, Heiner
    Lund University.
    Nanowire Interfacing with Molecular Motors: Light Guiding and Tunneling2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Lard, Mercy
    et al.
    Lund Univ.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Generosi, Johanna
    Lund Univ / Univ Copenhagen.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linke, Heiner
    Molecular Motor Transport through Hollow Nanowires2014In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 3041-3046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomolecular motors offer self-propelled, directed transport in designed microscale networks and can potentially replace pump-driven nanofluidics. However, in existing systems, transportation is limited to the two-dimensional plane. Here we demonstrate fully one-dimensional (1D) myosin-driven motion of fluorescent probes (actin filaments) through 80 nm wide, Al2O3 hollow nanowires of micrometer length. The motor-driven transport is orders of magnitude faster than would be possible by passive diffusion. The system represents a necessary element for advanced devices based on gliding assays, for example, in lab-on-a-chip systems with channel crossings and in pumpless nanosyringes. It may also serve as a scaffold for bottom-up assembly of muscle proteins into actin ordered contractile units, mimicking the muscle sarcomere.

  • 212. Legrand, Sacha
    et al.
    Heikkinen, Harri
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Root, Andrew
    Svenson, Johan
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Preparation, characterization and application of a stationary chromatographic phase from a new (+)-tartaric acid derivative2010In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 51, no 17, p. 2258-2261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation, characterization and application of a new stationary phase derived from 1,4-cyclohexanedione and diethyl (+)-tartrate are described. A suitable TADDOL for immobilization has been synthesized and grafted to a gamma-mercaptopropylsilylated silica gel. The resulting modified stationary phase has been characterized and its ability to separate enantiomers has been studied. While the free TADDOL in solution was able to resolve a range of enantiomers, the resolving properties were lost on immobilization. Solid state C-13 CPMAS NMR of the new stationary phase was used to explain the lack of stereoselective recognition. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 213.
    Lennartsson, Marie
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Digestion rate in vitro of modified starch2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 214.
    Lennqvist, Torbjörn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Humanexponering för PFOS via konsumtion av egenfångad fisk från vattendrag runt Stockholm2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) is a group of very stable molecules. Some PFAS are classed as persistant, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT-substances) with negative impacts on humans and animals. PFAS is a common ingredient in fire foam, and elevated levels are consequently often seen in water systems near fire drill areas. Today, perflourooctanoic acid (PFOS) is the only prohibited PFAS within the EU, and probably the most toxic.Tolerable daily intake (TDI) recommenadtions are only available for two PFAS within the EU; PFOS and PFOA. One of the main exposure routes of PFOS in humans are consumption of fish, whilePFOA usually isn’t detectable in fish.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze human exposure of 11 different PFAS (PFOS, PFOA, PFHxA, PFHxS, PFHpA, PFNA, PFDA, PFDS, PFBS, PFUnDA och PFOSA) after consumption of european perch (Perca fluviatilis) collected from water systems in an urban region of Sweden. The main focus substance of the study was PFOS, where different scenarios of PFOS-exposure after consumtion of perch were compared with toxicological reference values (TDIs) and with background exposure from consumtion of other foods and drinking water.

    METHODS: The PFOS-exposure from consumption of freshwater fish was calculatedfor two levels of consumers; a “most likely exposure level” (MSE, with a consumptionrate of maximum 6 times/year), and a “high exposure level” (HE, with a consumption rate of at least 1 time/week). The groups were further divided into “normal consumers” (who ate normal portions and had normal body weight) and “large consumers” (who atelarge portions and had a low body weight). The caclulations were based on three years of analysis data (2015-2017) on european perch from 14 different water systems around the city of Stockholm, which can be considered as representative fishing waters in an urban environment, without known PFOS point source. The analyzed PFOS concentrations in fish were used in conjunction with literature data on fish consumption and body weight to assess exposure. Data from the litterature were also used to calculate the exposure in the normal population, after consumption of other foods and drinkingwater. Also here a “most likely exposure level” (average consumtion of drinking water and average consumption rates and PFOS concentrations in other foods) and “high exposure level” (large consumer of drinking water and high PFOS exposure from other foods) were calculated. Thereafter, the results were compared with the tolerable daily intake (TDI), and the PFOS-exposure through consumption of perch was compared to the PFOS-intake following consumtion of other foods and drinking water.

    RESULTS: PFOS accounted for about 90% of the total PFAS in european perch. PFOS is the compound for which the exposure calculations were made.Background exposure by PFOS in the normal population, through consumtion of drinking water and other foods (including commercial fish), was calculated to 0,5 ng/kg/day (adults) and 0,7 ng/kg/day (children) for the most likely exposure level (MSE). För the higher exposure level (HE) the intake was calculated to 1,7 ng/kg/day for both adults and children, which is far below EFSA ́s current TDI of 150 ng/kg/day. When the background levels are related to the 4 exposure levels characterized after consumption of self-caught freshwater fish the results showed that:

    MSE – normal consumer: The PFOS exposure from consumption of freshwater fish in this group was 0,5 ng/kg/day (adults) and 1,1 ng/kg/day (children), which means that by consuming self-caught fish 6 times/year the PFOS-exposure will be doubled. Even so, the total intake is far below current TDI.

    MSE – high consumer: PFOS exposure from freshwater fish were 1 ng/kg/day and 2 ng/kg/day for adults and children respectively.

    HE – normal consumer: The PFOS exposure for women were 17 ng/kg/day and 18 ng/kg/day for men while the result form children were 37 ng/kg/day.

    HE – high consumer: The PFOS exposure in this “worst case scenario” was 27 and 33ng/kg/day for women and men respectively and 70 ng/kg/day for children. In this group the exposure were about 15 times higher than the background exposure for adults and 40 times higher for children.

    CONCLUSIONS: That PFOS accounted for the largest part of PFAS in fish is in accordance with previously published studies. Normal and large consumption offreshwater fish within the “MSE”-group, of freshwater fish, from the water systems near the city of Stockholm which are covered in the study, is not a health risk according to the TDI that apply today. However, it gives a percentually large increase in PFOS intake relative to what is normally expected from food intake (including drinkingwater). High consumers in the “HE”-group constitute a worst case scenario, where children in the group reach a PFOS-exposure of about half of TDI. In the event of a possible revision of TDI also normal consumers in the “HE”-group may close in to, or pass, the TDI-limits.

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  • 215.
    Lindelöw, Elinor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Identifiering av flyktiga substanser från äppelvin med jästdoft2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An apple wine produced by Kiviks Musteri AB have an undesirable flavor of yeast. As a step in the development to reduce this off-flavour the wine flavor was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME). Two other wines without the flavor of yeast where analyzed as references. Samples from the production step prior to clarification where also analyzed. Through matching against mass spectrum library, retention index and in some cases references a total of 37 volatile compounds were identified in the apple wines. Some uncertainty in the relative quantification of a few compounds was caused by insufficient clearance (deadsorption) of the SPME-fiber. When comparing the different wines the compounds were divided into groups: key compounds, ethyl esters, derivatives of 3-methyl-1-butanol, other compounds: group 1 and other compounds: group 2. In each group the percent area for each compound was calculated. Comparing the percent area of each wine showed that the samples prior to clarification contains a higher number of volatile compounds e.g. ethyl esters and 3-methylbutanol derivatives than the final wine products. The comparisons also revealed differences between the wines. The results from the analyses indicated that the compounds that hypothetically contribute to the yeast-flavor could be 2-phenylethanol; 3-methylbutanoic acid; 2-methyl-1-butanol; 2-phenylacetaldehyde och 2-methylthiolan-3-one. The results need to be verified e.g. by an odor panel if they are going to be useful for Kivik Musteri AB in its effort to solve the taste problem in the wine.

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  • 216.
    Lindh Dillon, Beatrice
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Kan marinering av kött reducera uppkomsten av heterocykliska aminer vid tillagning?: En litteraturstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over 20 different mutagenic substances has been detected in cooked food. These include heterocyclic amines. Studies have shown that these amines can create mutations and increase the risk of developing cancer. Heterocyclic amines are formed in meat during the Maillard reaction which occours at high temperature cooking.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate if the effect of marinating with beer, wine and herbs/spices can reduce the formation of heterocyclic amines found in cooked meat.

    Method: This study is a literature study with a selection of articles from databases PubMed and Web of Science. Six articles were included in this study. 3 articles involved marinade with beer/wine and 3 articles involved marinade with herbs/spices and extract.

    Results: All studies examined showed that marinating has a reducing effect on the concentration of heterocyclic amines formed during cooking. The most credible hypothesis of the mechanism is that the effect depends on the antioxidativ capacity of the marinades. For example one marinade with the combination of turmeric and lemon grass reduced the concentration of heterocyclic amines by 94,8%.

    Conclusion: Marinades containing beer, wine or herbs/spices was shown to effectively reduce the amount of heterocyclic amines. Great reducing effects were found using turmeric, lemon grass, ginger and black beer. More scientific research is needed to determine if the reduction is linked to the antioxidant effect in marinades.

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  • 217.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Identifiering av källan till gasbildande förskämningsbakterier i kycklingproduktion2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 218.
    Lipnicevic, Maja
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Påverkan på halten vitamin C vid processning av fruktdrycker2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 219.
    Lundin, Josefin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Investigation of How Different Fat Systems and Other Ingredients Affect the Properties of Whipping Creams Based on Vegetable Fat2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Whipping creams are oil-in-water emulsion which by whipping can be formed to a foam by the incorporation of air into the system. Traditionally whipping creams are made out of milk but today imitation whipping creams based on vegetable fat has gained a large share of the marked due to their many benefits compared to traditionally whipping creams. Imitation whipping creams are both cheaper and more flexible than traditionally creams. By vary the characteristics of the fat system and the cream recipe the properties of the imitation creams can be adapted to fit the purpose of a specific product.

    The aim of this thesis was to increase the understanding of how different types of fat systems and other ingredients affect the properties of imitation whipping creams based on vegetable fat. This was done by studying three vegetable fat systems with different physicochemical properties. The properties of the fat systems were characterized and the three fat systems were then used for making different imitation whipping creams. The properties of the creams were characterized and the properties of the fat systems and the creams were assessed and compared with each other.

    The study showed that the fat characteristics that generally seem to have the highest impact on the properties of whipping creams are the structure, the solid fat content and the crystallization temperature of the fat. A fat solution with a hard structure, a high crystallization temperature and a high solid fat content at a wide range of temperatures overall seem to provide the whipping creams with the best properties. This as these fat properties provide the creams with a high foam stability, a high overrun and a short whipping time. This study has also shown that other ingredients than the fat systems provide the creams with diverging properties. This is best shown by the results of the freeze-thaw stability which indicate that a recipe with a high amount of sugar seem to provide the whipping creams with good freeze-thaw stability. Other properties of the whipping creams also seem to be very much influenced by other ingredients than the fat systems but further studies are needed to provide clarity to the complexity of the interplay of the ingredients in whipped creams.

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    Investigation of How Different Fat Systems and Other Ingredients Affect the Properties of Whipping Creams Based on Vegetable Fat
  • 220.
    Lundmark, Mikaela
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Review of common methods for the analysis of allergens in food and the validation of ELISA method for egg and soy proteins2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food allergy is an abnormal immune response triggered by foods harmless to the body. A food company must follow legislation regarding production and labeling of a product, since the allergen content should not pose a risk for allergy sufferers. Allergen testing of the products is common and the outcome of the testing must be reliable. The food industry demands that laboratories validate their methods. In this study, a market survey was conducted to select the most suitable method for the company ALcontrol, when analyzing presence of egg, soy and wheat allergen in meat product and spice matrices. The method selected was sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sandwich ELISA). A set of analysis data was created to be used in an accreditation application to the Swedish board of accreditation and conformity assessment (SWEDAC). Data was interpreted via two parameters; limit of quantification (LOQ) and recovery. The LOQs of the egg assay were determined to 0.01 mg/kg in regular extraction buffer and 0.15 mg/kg in tannin extraction buffer. In a validation of the kit, performed by the supplier ELISA Systems (ELISA Systems 2010) the limit of detection (LOD), calculated from the standard deviation (STD) x 3, was determined to 0.091, hence giving a LOQ of 0.273. Compared to the validation, the result in this study showed the potential of even lower LOQ’s. The recoveries of egg protein in the meat product matrix in tannin extraction buffer were determined to 102%, 98% and 118% for 1.048 mg/kg, 2.096 mg/kg and 5.24 mg/kg respectively. The recoveries of egg protein in the meat product matrix in regular extraction buffer were determined to 116%, 116% and 93 % for 1.048 mg/kg, 2.096 mg/kg and 5.24 mg/kg respectively. The recoveries of egg protein in the spice matrix in tannin extraction buffer were determined to 90%, 88% and 69% for 1.048 mg/kg, 2.096 mg/kg and 5.24 mg/kg respectively. The recoveries of egg protein in the spice matrix in regular extraction buffer were determined to 89%, 83% and 70% for 1.048 mg/kg, 2.096 mg/kg and 5.24 mg/kg respectively. The LOQs of the soy assay were determined to 0.133 mg/kg in regular extraction buffer and 0.07 mg/kg in tannin extraction buffer. The recoveries of soy protein in the meat product matrix in regular extraction buffer were determined to 42%, 25% and 16% for 1.78 mg/kg, 3.56 mg/kg and 7.12 mg/kg, respectively. The recoveries of soy protein in the spice matrix in tannin extraction buffer were determined to 38%, 31% and 25% for 1.78 mg/kg, 3.56 mg/kg and 7.12 mg/kg, respectively. In a validation of the kit, performed by the supplier ELISA Systems, the recovery was tested in several matrices. None of the matrices are fully comparable to the matrices of sausage and spice. If compared, the results of this study showed significantly lower recoveries than the ELISA Systems’ validation. An evaluation was conducted and reviewed by the Quality Manager of ALcontrol. The ELISA methods for both egg and soy were considered reliable and approved by the Quality Manager of ALcontrol, within the concept of allergen testing. The methods will be used by ALcontrol in their analyses, and the results from this report will be used when applying to SWEDAC for accreditation for the ELISA method of egg and soy allergen.

  • 221.
    Lutic, Doina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Sanati, Mehri
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. Bioenergiteknik.
    Catalytic properties of oxide nanoparticles applied in gas sensors2007In: TOPICS IN CATALYSIS, ISSN 1022-5528, Vol. 45, no 1-4, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of gas sensing layers based on indium oxide doped with gold were prepared by using the aerosol technology for deposition as the active contact layer in a metal oxide semiconductor capacitive device. The interaction between the measured species and the insulator surface was quantified as the voltage changes at a constant capacitance of the device. The sensor properties were investigated in the presence of H2, CO, NH3, NO, NO2 and C3H6 at temperatures between 100–400 °C. Significant differences in the morphology of the layer and its sensitivity were noted for different preparation methods and different gas environments.

  • 222.
    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Birch, Heidi
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Comparing chemical analysis with literature studies to identify micropollutants to be treated or upstream source controlled in a catchment of Copenhagen (DK)2012In: 6th SETAC World Congress/SETAC Europe 22nd Annual Meeting: abstract book, Berlin: Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry , 2012, p. 287-288Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Mahajan, Rashmi
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rouhi, Mona
    Malmö University.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    Malmö University.
    Bedwell, Thomas
    Univ Leicester, UK.
    Incel, Anil
    Malmö University.
    Mavliutova, Liliia
    Malmö University.
    Piletsky, Sergey
    Univ Leicester, UK.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University.
    Highly Efficient Synthesis and Assay of Protein-Imprinted Nanogels by Using Magnetic Templates2019In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 727-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report an approach integrating the synthesis of protein-imprinted nanogels ("plastic antibodies") with a highly sensitive assay employing templates attached to magnetic carriers. The enzymes trypsin and pepsin were immobilized on amino-functionalized solgel-coated magnetic nanoparticles (magNPs). Lightly crosslinked fluorescently doped polyacrylamide nanogels were subsequently produced by high-dilution polymerization of monomers in the presence of the magNPs. The nanogels were characterised by a novel competitive fluorescence assay employing identical protein-conjugated nanoparticles as ligands to reversibly immobilize the corresponding nanogels. Both nanogels exhibited K-d<10 pM for their respective target protein and low cross-reactivity with five reference proteins. This agrees with affinities reported for solid-phase-synthesized nanogels prepared using low-surface-area glass-bead supports. This approach simplifies the development and production of plastic antibodies and offers direct access to a practical bioassay.

  • 224.
    Mandal, Sudip
    et al.
    Indian Inst Technol Madras, India.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Uppsala University.
    Ramanujam, Kothandaraman
    Indian Inst Technol Madras, India.
    Electrochemically synthesized molecularly imprinted polyaniline nanostructure: A recognition matrix for biotinylated targets2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 225.
    Markiewicz, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hvitt Strömvall, Ann-Margret
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Björklund, Karin
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kalmykova, Yuliya
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Siopi, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Emissions of organic pollutants from traffic and roads: priority pollutants selection and substance flow analysis2015In: : Presented at the 12th Urban Environment Symposium, Oslo, Norway, June 1-3, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Marshall, D. G.
    et al.
    AgResearch Ltd, New Zealand.
    Jackson, T. A.
    AgResearch Ltd, New Zealand.
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. New Zealand Inst Plant & Food Res Ltd, New Zealand.
    Wee, S. L.
    New Zealand Inst Plant & Food Res Ltd, New Zealand ; Univ Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Young, S. D.
    AgResearch Ltd, New Zealand.
    Townsend, R. J.
    AgResearch Ltd, New Zealand.
    Suckling, D. M.
    New Zealand Inst Plant & Food Res Ltd, New Zealand ; Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Morganella morganii bacteria produces phenol as the sex pheromone of the New Zealand grass grub from tyrosine in the colleterial gland2016In: The Science of Nature: Naturwissenschaften, ISSN 0028-1042, E-ISSN 1432-1904, Vol. 103, no 7-8, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Costelytra zealandica (Coleoptera: Scarabeidae) is a univoltine endemic species that has colonised and become a major pest of introduced clover and ryegrass pastures that form about half of the land area of New Zealand. Female beetles were previously shown to use phenol as their sex pheromone produced by symbiotic bacteria in the accessory or colleterial gland. In this study, production of phenol was confirmed from the female beetles, while bacteria were isolated from the gland and tested for attractiveness towards grass grub males in traps in the field. The phenol-producing bacterial taxon was identified by partial sequencing of the 16SrRNA gene, as Morganella morganii. We then tested the hypothesis that the phenol sex pheromone is biosynthesized from the amino acid tyrosine by the bacteria. This was shown to be correct, by addition of isotopically labelled tyrosine (C-13) to the bacterial broth, followed by detection of the labelled phenol by SPME-GCMS. Elucidation of this pathway provides specific evidence how the phenol is produced as an insect sex pheromone by a mutualistic bacteria.

  • 227.
    Meiby, Elinor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Progress of Weak Affinity Chromatography as a Tool in Drug Development2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Weak Affinity Chromatography (WAC) is a technology that was developed to analyse weak (KD > 10-5 M) although selective interactions between biomolecules. The focus of this thesis was to develop this method for various applications in the drug development process.

     

    Fragment Based Drug Discovery is a new approach in finding new small molecular drugs. Here, relatively small libraries (a few hundreds to a few thousands of compounds) of fragments (150 – 300 Da) are screened against the target. Fragment hits are then developed into lead molecules by linking, growing or merging fragments binding to different locations of the protein’s active site. However, due to the weakly binding nature of fragments, methods that are able to detect very weak binding events are needed. In this thesis, WAC is presented as a new robust and highly reproducible technology for fragment screening. The technology is demonstrated against a number of different protein targets – proteases, kinases, chaperones and protein-protein interaction (PPI) targets. Comparison of data from fragment screening of 111 fragments by WAC and other more established technologies for fragment screening, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), validates WAC as a screening technology. It also points at the importance of performing fragment screening by multiple methods as they complement each other.

     

    Other applications of WAC in drug development are also presented. The method can be used for chiral separations of racemic mixtures during fragment screening, which enables affinity measurements of individual enantiomers binding to the target of interest. Further, analysis of crude reaction mixtures is shown. By these procedures, the affinity of the product can be assessed directly after synthesis without any time-consuming purification steps. In addition, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system for highly efficient drug partition studies was developed by stable immobilization of lipid bilayer disks – lipodisks – on a high performance silica support material. These lipodisks are recognized model membranes for drug partition studies. A WAC system with incorporated membrane proteins into immobilized lipodisks has also been produced and evaluated with the ultimate objective to study affinity interactions between ligands and membrane proteins.

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  • 228.
    Meiby, Elinor
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    M Zetterberg, Malin
    Uppsala University.
    Victor, Hernàndez
    Uppsala University.
    Ohlson, Sten
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Nanyang Technol Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Singapore 637551, Singapore.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University.
    Immobilized lipodisks as model membranes in high-throughput HPLC-MS analysis.2013In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 405, no 14, p. 4859-4869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipodisks, also referred to as polyethylene glycol (PEG)-stabilized bilayer disks, have previously been demonstrated to hold great potential as model membranes in drug partition studies. In this study, an HPLC-MS system with stably immobilized lipodisks is presented. Functionalized lipodisks were immobilized on two different HPLC support materials either covalently by reductive amination or by streptavidin-biotin binding. An analytical HPLC column with immobilized lipodisks was evaluated by analysis of mixtures containing 15 different drug compounds. The efficiency, reproducibility, and stability of the system were found to be excellent. In situ incorporation of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in immobilized lipodisks on a column was also achieved. Specific binding of COX-1 to the immobilized lipodisks was validated by interaction studies with QCM-D. These results, taken together, open up the possibility of studying ligand interactions with membrane proteins by weak affinity chromatography.

  • 229. Mezer, A.
    et al.
    Friedman, Ran
    Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Noivirt, O.
    Nachliel, E.
    Gutman, M.
    The mechanism of proton transfer between adjacent sites exposed to water2005In: J. Chem. Phys. B, Vol. 109, p. 11379-11388Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Vezzaro, Luca
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Birch, Heidi
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Høg, Hans-Henrik
    Albertslund Municipality, Denmark.
    Sharma, Anitha Kumari
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Monitoring, chemical fate modelling and uncertainty assessment in combination: a tool for evaluating emission control scenarios for micropollutants in stormwater systems2012In: WSUD 2012 - 7th international conference on water sensitive urban design: building the water sensitive community: final program and abstract book, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stormwater discharges can represent significant sources of micropollutants (MP), including heavy metals and xenobiotic organic compounds that may pose a toxicity risk to aquatic ecosystems. Control of stormwater quality and reduction of MP loads is therefore necessary for a sustainable stormwater management in urban areas, but it is strongly hampered by the general lack of field data on these substances. A framework for combining field monitoring campaigns with dynamic MP modelling tools and statistical methods for uncertainty analysis was hence developed to estimate MP fluxes and fate in stormwater runoff and treatment systems under sparse data conditions.The framework was applied to an industrial/residential area in the outskirts of Copenhagen (Denmark), where stormwater is discharged in a separate channel system discharging to a wet detention pond. Analysis of economic activities and GIS data on land usage allowed characterizing the catchment and identifying the major potential sources of stormwater MP. Monitoring of the pond inlet and outlet, as well as sediment analyses, allowed assessing the current situation and highlighted potential risks for the downstream surface water environment. The collected data was used in combination with an integrated dynamic MP fate model to estimate the MP fluxes in the catchment and the MP fate in the pond over a 10-year period. The model was also used to evaluate the potential effects of anticipated future climate changes as well as different scenarios for reduction of MP emissions while considering the uncertainty of the model predictions.

  • 231.
    Mostofi, Azalia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Antifouling surfaces based on poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)/poly(SBMA) grafted onto functionalized gold2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 232.
    Månsson, Alf
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Balaz, Martina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Torres, Nuria Albet
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Johan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    In vitro assays of molecular motors - impact of motor-surface interactions2008In: Frontiers in Bioscience, ISSN 1093-9946, E-ISSN 1093-4715, Vol. 13, no May 1, p. 5732-5754Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many types of biophysical studies of both single molecules and ensembles of molecular motors the motors are adsorbed to artificial surfaces. Some of the most important assay systems of this type (in vitro motility assays and related single molecule techniques) will be briefly described together with an account of breakthroughs in the understanding of actomyosin function that have resulted from their use. A poorly characterized, but potentially important, entity in these studies is the mechanism of motor adsorption to surfaces and the effects of motor surface interactions on experimental results. A better understanding of these phenomena is also important for the development of commercially viable nanotechnological applications powered by molecular motors. Here, we will consider several aspects of motor surface interactions with a particular focus on heavy meromyosin (HMM) from skeletal muscle. These aspects will be related to heavy meromyosin structure and relevant parts of the vast literature on protein-surface interactions for non-motor proteins. An overview of methods for studying motor-surface interactions will also be given. The information is used as a basis for further development of a model for HMM-surface interactions and is discussed in relation to experiments where nanopatterning has been employed for in vitro reconstruction of actomyosin order. The challenges and potentials of this approach in biophysical studies, compared to the use of self-assembly of biological components into supramolecular protein aggregates (e. g. myosin filaments) will be considered. Finally, this review will consider the implications for further developments of motor-powered lab-on-a-chip devices.

  • 233.
    Nawaz Afridi, Hazrat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for selective recognition of bupivacaine2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 234.
    Ndizeye, Natacha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    New Strategies for Preparing Polymers with Hierarchical Architectures2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this thesis was to explore novel approaches for controlling morphologies and molecular recognition behaviour of polymers and to use these strategies in conjunction with the molecular imprinting technique in order to either enhance polymer performance in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor applications, or as an alternative to conventional solvents of polymerization. In Papers I and II, the use of liquid crystalline media in the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers was demonstrated. When used in conjunction with the molecular imprinting technique the LC media induced hierarchical material architectures, which provided an enhancement of QCM-sensor sensitivity. The use of a class of novel solvents, so-called “non-ionic deep eutectic solvents (ni-DESs)”, was explored in polymer synthesis, Paper III, and for molecularly imprinted polymer synthesis, Paper IV. The use of these solvents produced polymers with morphological features comparable to those prepared in conventional solvents, and sensitivities towards bupivacaine template were observed. Collectively these results present a new strategy for generating new hierarchical polymer architectures and a new class of solvent for polymer synthesis, which can also be used for molecular imprinting, that can be used as an alternative to conventional and sometimes flammable or toxic polymerization solvents.

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  • 235.
    Ndizeye, Natacha
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Hierarchical polymeric architectures through molecular imprinting in liquid crystalline environments2018In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 106, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of liquid crystalline (LC) media as sacrificial templates during the polymer synthesis has been explored. The LC-media introduce morphological features into resultant polymers which when used together with molecular imprinting can produce materials with hierarchical architectures. Bupivacaine (1) imprinted co-polymers of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) (2a) and 1,4-divinylbenzene (DVB) (3a) were synthesized using photochemical initiation in lyotrophic liquid crystalline phases of AOT (5) in water/p-xylene and Triton X-100 (6) /water systems. SEM studies revealed the impact of the LC-media on polymer morphology, with polymer brush-like structures, with bristles of ≈30 nm diameter. The polymer morphology reflects that of the hexagonal phase of the LC medium. The rebinding characteristics of polymer films were evaluated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, under FIA conditions). The influence of the presence of imprinting-derived recognition sites in AOT (5) in water/p-xylene polymer film induced brush-like features which provided a 25-fold enhancement of sensor sensitivity. This chemosensor was shown to be selective for the local anesthetic template, bupivacaine, through studies using the structural analogues ropivacaine and mepivacaine.

  • 236.
    Ndizeye, Natacha
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Polymer synthesis in non-ionic deep eutectic solvents2019In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962, Vol. 10, no 39, p. 5289-5295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report the use of the use of non-ionic deep eutectic solvents (ni-DESs) as porogens in polymer synthesis. Three ni-DES systems, acetamide-N-methylacetamide (AA-NMA), N-methylacetamide-N-methylurea (NMA-NMU) and N-methylacetamide-N,N'-dimethylurea (NMA-NN'DMU), were deployed in the synthesis of a series of cross-linked copolymer monoliths comprised of a functional monomer, methacrylic acid (MAA) or hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), and a cross-linking monomer, ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA) or divinylbenzene (DVB) or 1,4-bis(acryloyl)piperazine (BAP). Polymers were synthesized under thermally initiated conditions with 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) or 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAH) as an initiator. The resulting polymer monoliths were ground and sieved to yield particles of 63-125 mu m. Corresponding polymers prepared in conventional porogens, acetonitrile, toluene and water were synthesized to serve as controls. The influence of the respective niDESs on polymer morphologies was examined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) N2-adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zeta potential measurements. The materials displayed surface areas, pore volumes and pore diameters of 115-532 m(2) g(-1), 0.1-1.4 cm(3) g(-1) and 5.2-12.5 nm, generally comparable with those of polymers obtained using conventional solvents, thus presenting these ni-DESs as viable alternatives to conventional organic solvents. The post-polymerization recovery of the ni-DESs (>80%) was demonstrated, highlighting the potential for using these novel liquids as alternatives to conventional, and often more expensive, toxic, flammable or volatile solvents in polymer synthesis.

  • 237.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH Royal instute of technology, Sweden.
    Alberch, Laura
    KTH Royal instute of technology, Sweden.
    Ramström, Olof
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. KTH Royal instute of technology, Sweden;Univ Massachusetts, USA.
    Design, Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Functional Amphiphilic Metallodendrimers2020In: ChemistryOpen, ISSN 2191-1363, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new family of alkynylated, amphiphilic dendrimers consisting of amidoamine linkers connected to 5,5 '-functionalized 2,2 '-bipyridine cores has been developed and evaluated in the formation of metallodendrimers of different generations and in self-assembly protocols. A convergent synthetic strategy was applied to provide dumbbell-shaped amphiphilic dendrimers, where the 2,2 '-bipyridine cores could be coordinated to Fe-II centers to afford corresponding metallodendrimers. The ability of the metallic- and non-metallic dendritic structures to self-assemble into functional supramolecular aggregates were furthermore evaluated in aqueous solution. Spherical aggregates with sizes of a few hundred nanometers were generally produced, where controlled disassembly of the metallodendrimers through decomplexation could be achieved.

  • 238.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Towards the Rational Design of Functional Molecularly Imprinted Polymers2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Adbo, Karina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Per-Ola
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ankarloo, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hedin-Dahlström, Jimmy
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Jokela, Päivi
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Karlsson, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olofsson, Linus
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren-Holmberg, Jenny
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Shoravi, Siamak
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Svenson, Johan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Can we rationally design molecularly imprinted polymers?2001In: Analytica Chimica Acta, Vol. 435, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Adbo, Karina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Per Ola
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hedin-Dahlström, Jimmy
    Karlsson, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Jenny P.
    Svenson, Johan
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Molecularly imprinted polymers: unique possibilities for environmental monitoring2002In: Proceedings of Kalmar Eco-Tech'01 : conference on leachate and waste water treatment with high-tech and natural systems : the 3rd International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation Between Companies/Institutions in the Nordic Countries and the Countries in the Baltic Sea Region : November 26 to 28, 2001 Kalmar, Sweden / [ed] William Hogland, Vilmantė Vyšniauskaitė, Högskolan i Kalmar, 2002, p. 285-288Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thermodynamic principles underlying molecularly imprinted polymer formation and ligand recognition2000Other (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Charlton, Christy
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Henschel, Henning
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    O'Mahony, John
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Theoretical and Computational Strategies for Rational Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Design2009In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 543-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The further evolution of molecularly imprinted polymer science and technology necessitates the development of robust predictive tools capable of handling the complexity of molecular imprinting systems. A combination of the rapid growth in computer power over the past decade and significant software developments have opened new possibilities for simulating aspects of the complex molecular imprinting process. We present here a survey of the current status of the use of in silico-based approaches to aspects of molecular imprinting. Finally, we highlight areas where ongoing and future efforts should yield information critical to our understanding of the underlying mechanisms sufficient to permit the rational design of molecularly imprinted polymers. 

  • 243.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Golker, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Henschel, Henning
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Shoravi, Siamak
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rational Design of Biomimetic Molecularly Imprinted Materials: Theoretical and Computational Strategies for Guiding Nanoscale Structured Polymer Development2011In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 400, p. 1771-1786Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In principle, molecularly imprinted polymer science and technology provides a means for ready access to nano-structured polymeric materials of predetermined selectivity. The versatility of the technique has brought it to the attention of many working with the development of nanomaterials with biological or biomimetic properties for use as therapeutics or in medical devices. Nonetheless, the further evolution of the field necessitates the development of robust predictive tools capable of handling the complexity of molecular imprinting systems. The rapid growth in computer power and software over the past decade has opened new possibilities for simulating aspects of the complex molecular imprinting process. We present here a survey of the current status of the use of in silico-based approaches to aspects of molecular imprinting. Finally, we highlight areas where ongoing and future efforts should yield information critical to our understanding of the underlying mechanisms sufficient to permit the rational design of molecularly imprinted polymers.

  • 244.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Golker, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Henschel, Henning
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Shoravi, Siamak
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rational molecularly imprinted polymer design: theoretical and computational strategies2013In: Molecular Imprinting: Principles and Applications of Micro- and Nanostructured Polymers / [ed] Ye, L, London: Pan Stanford Publishing, 2013, p. 71-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Per-Ola
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Method and apparatus for detecting pharmaceuticals in a sample2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Per-Ola
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Method and apparatus for detecting pharmaceuticals in a sample2010Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 247.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Golker, Kerstin
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Henschel, Henning
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    O'Mahony, John
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Orozovic, Kanita
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren-Holmberg, Jenny P.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Shoravi, Siamak
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Biomimetic Polymer Design2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Computational Strategies for the Design and Study of Molecularly Imprinted Materials2013In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 52, no 39, p. 13900-13909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for materials with predetermined ligand-selectivities for use in sensing and separation technologies, e.g. membranes and chromatography, has driven the development of molecularly imprinted polymer science and technology. Over recent years, the need to develop robust predictive tools capable of handling the complexity of molecular imprinting systems has become apparent The current status of the use of in silica techniques in molecular imprinting is here presented, and we highlight areas where new developments are contributing to improvements in the rational design of molecularly imprinted polymers.

  • 249.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Moledcular Imprints2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 250.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Theoretical and Computational Strategies in Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Development2018In: Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Analytical Chemistry Applications / [ed] Wlodzimierz Kutner, Piyush Sindhu Sharma, London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018, p. 197-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical and computational studies of molecular imprinting have helped provide valuable insights concerning the nature of the molecular-level events underlying the recognition characteristics of molecularly imprinted materials. Here, we first present an overview of a thermodynamic treatment of factors governing the behaviour of these functional materials, and then a summary of the development and current status of the use of computational strategies for studying aspects of molecular imprinting and the resulting material properties.

2345678 201 - 250 of 392
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