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  • 201.
    Wijma, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Schei, B.
    St Olav Hospital, Trondheim.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hilden, M.
    Copenhagen University Hospital.
    Offerdal, K.
    St Olav Hospital, Trondheim.
    Pikarinen, U.
    Helsinki University Central Hospital.
    Sidenius, K.
    Copenhagen University Hospital.
    Steingrimsdottir, T.
    Landspitalinn, Reykjavik.
    Stoum, H.
    St Olav Hospital, Trondheim.
    Halmesmäki, E.
    Helsinki University Central Hospital.
    Emotional, physical, and sexual abuse in patients visiting gynaecology clinics: a Nordic cross-sectional study2003Inngår i: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 361, nr 9375, s. 2107-2113Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Abuse against women causes much suffering for individuals and is a major concern for society. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of three types of abuse in patients visiting gynaecology clinics in five Nordic countries, and to assess the frequency with which gynaecologists identify abuse victims.

    Methods

    We did a cross-sectional, multicentre study of women attending five departments of gynaecology in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. We recruited 4729 patients; 3641 (77%) responded and were included in the study. Participants completed a postal questionnaire (norvold abuse questionnaire) confidentially. Primary outcome measures were prevalences of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, and whether abused patients had told their gynaecologist about these experiences. We assessed differences between countries with Pearson's χ2 test.

    Findings

    The ranges across the five countries of lifetime prevalence were 38–66% for physical abuse, 19–37% for emotional abuse, and 17–33% for sexual abuse. Not all abused women reported current ill-effects from the abusive experience. Most women (92–98%) had not talked to their gynaecologist about their experiences of abuse at their latest clinic visit.

    Interpretation

    Despite prevalences of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse being high in patients visiting gynaecology clinics in the Nordic countries, most victims of abuse are not identified by their gynaecologists. This lack of discussion might increase the risk of abused patients not being treated according to their needs. Gynaecologists should always consider asking their patients about abuse.

  • 202.
    Wimo, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet;Uppsala University;County Council of Gävleborg;HC Bergsjö.
    Elmstål, S.
    Lund University.
    Fratiglioni, L.
    Karolinska Institutet;Stockholm Gerontology Research Center.
    Sjölund, B.-M.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sköldunger, A.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Lagergren, M.
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Center.
    Formal and informal care of community-living older people: a population-based study from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care2017Inngår i: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 17-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Study formal and informal care of community-living older people in the Swedish National study of Aging and Care (SNAC).

    Design: Cross-sectional, population based cohort.

    Setting: Three areas in Sweden: Municipality of Nordanstig, Stockholm and Skåne County.

    Participants: 3,338 persons ≥72 years.

    Measurements: Patterns and amounts of informal and formal care by cognition and area of residence.

    Results: 73% received no care; 14% formal care; and 17% informal care (7% received both). In the whole study population, including those who used no care, individuals in small municipalities received 9.6 hours of informal care/month; in mid-size municipalities, 6.6; and in urban areas, 5.6. Users of informal care received 33.1 hours of informal care/month in small municipalities, 54.6 in mid-size municipalities and 36.1 in urban areas. Individuals with cognitive impairment received 14.1 hours of informal care/month, 2.7 times more than people with no/slight impairment. In the whole study population, individuals in small municipalities received an average of 3.2 hours of formal care/month; in mid-size municipalities 1.4; and in urban areas, 2.6. Corresponding figures for formal care users were 29.4 hours in small municipalities, 13.6 in mid-size municipalities and 16.7 in urban areas. Formal care users received 7.1 hours, and informal care users, 5.9 hours for each hour/month received by people in the study population as a whole.

    Conclusions: More informal than formal care was provided. Informal care is more frequent in small municipalities than urban areas and for those with than without cognitive impairment. The relationship between data on the whole population and the data on users or care indicates that population-based data are needed to avoid overestimates of care.

  • 203.
    Winger, Anette
    et al.
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Kvarstein, Gunnvald
    UIT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Wyller, Vegard Bruun
    University of Oslo, Norway;Oslo University Hospital, Norway;Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology;Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Sulheim, Dag
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway;Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway.
    Fagermoen, Even
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Smastuen, Milada Cvancarova
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Helseth, Solvi
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Health related quality of life in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: a cross-sectional study2015Inngår i: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 13, artikkel-id 96Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study health related quality of life (HRQOL) and depressive symptoms in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and to investigate in which domains their HRQOL and depressive symptoms differ from those of healthy adolescents.

    Background and objective: Several symptoms such as disabling fatigue, pain and depressive symptoms affect different life domains of adolescents with CFS. Compared to adolescents with other chronic diseases, young people with CFS are reported to be severely impaired, both physiologically and mentally. Despite this, few have investigated the HRQOL in this group.

    Method: This is a cross-sectional study on HRQOL including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 healthy controls (HC), between 12 and 18 years. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (TM), 4.0 (PedsQL) was used to assess HRQOL. The Mood and Feelings Questionnaire assessed depressive symptoms. Data were collected between March 2010 and October 2012 as part of the NorCAPITAL project (Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial). Linear and logistic regression models were used in analysis, and all tests were two-sided.

    Results: Adolescents with CFS reported significantly lower overall HRQOL compared to HCs. When controlling for gender differences, CFS patients scored 44 points lower overall HRQOL on a scale from 0-100 compared to HCs. The domains with the largest differences were interference with physical health (B = -59, 95 % CI -54 to -65) and school functioning (B = -52, 95 % CI -45 to -58). Both depressive symptoms and being a patient were independently associated with lower levels of HRQOL

    Conclusion: The difference in HRQOL between CFS patients and healthy adolescents was even larger than we expected. The large sample of adolescents with CFS in our study confirms previous findings from smaller studies, and emphasizes that CFS is a seriously disabling condition that has a strong impact on their HRQOL. Even though depressive symptoms were found in the group of patients, they could not statistically explain the poor HRQOL.

  • 204. Wolfram, Nicole
    et al.
    Rigby, Michael
    Frazzica, Rosa Guiseppa
    Kirch, Willhelm
    Bergman, Patrick
    Sjöström, Michael
    Di Mattia, Pasquale
    Häger, Cristiane
    Neumann, Grit
    Klein, Doreen
    Physical activity and nutrition-health information activities of the EU, WHO, European networks and national examples2007Inngår i: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 15, nr Supplement 1, s. S3-S53Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Many Health Information Activities related to nutrition and physical activity have been initiated during the past years by several institutions on the national and international level as well as by several European networks. A multitude of projects with different scopes and methodologies has arisen. This variety makes it necessary to bring the results of these activities into a coordinated framework. The report aims to give a structured overview on the availability of routine repeated or repeatable data on the health determinants nutrition and physical activity in European countries. An Inventory of Health Information Activities on physical activity and nutrition was built up, which summarises activities carried out by the European Commission, the WHO, various European Networks, as well as national examples. The Health Information Activities collected as national examples assess data for all countries belonging to the European Union up to 2006, the European Economic Area (EEA) and all Candidate countries. The Inventory considers activities which started in 1990 or later, which were still running or have been approved but not yet started.

    Method

    The report analyses institutional structures (WHO, European Commission, European Networks) as well as examples of health information activities at the national level. A network of European public health professionals identified available national health information activities and survey data, which were summarised in a structured online database.

    Results

    The results section presents activities in the field of health information on physical activity and nutrition of the European Commission (DG Sanco), the World Health Organisation (Europe) and various European networks. Furthermore, this section presents the analysis of the database which summarises health information activities in European countries. The database is freely accessible at the website of the Working Party. Additionally, the supplement provides a summary of Health Information Activities for each country in Country Profile Sheets.

    Conclusion

    The report provides a general overview on Health Information Activities related to physical activity and nutrition as well as a state-of-the-art investigation about available data in European countries. The concluding section of the report aims to recommend future Health Information actions which outline open issues.

  • 205.
    Zarea, Kourosh
    et al.
    Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Ghanbari, Samira
    Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Beiranvand, Saeed
    Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Tuvesson, Hanna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Incidence of gastrointestinal cancers in Iran: A systematic review2017Inngår i: Jundishapur Journal of Chronic Disease Care, ISSN 3758-2322, Vol. 6, nr 1, artikkel-id e37224Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: In service planning, indicators such as incidence can aid the development of strategies for service provision. The current systematic review was carried out to provide a general viewpoint on incidence, geographical and age distribution of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers in Iran.

    Evidence Acquisition: A detailed Science Direct, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Iran Medex, Magiran and SID (scientific information databases) search was made from 2005 to 2015. The basic inclusion criteria were all relevant studies focused on GI cancers incidence and epidemiologic data from Iran.

    Results: Overall incidence of cancer was 19.4 and 17.2 per 100 000 in males and females, respectively. The three most common GI cancers in males were: esophagus, stomach and colorectal and in females: colorectal, stomach and esophagus. The highest incidence rate was observed in Golestan province and in the age group over 65 years.

    Conclusions: According to increasing incidence rate of GI cancers in Iran, development, establishment and implement of comprehensive national cancer control program should be the first priorities for health policy makers.

  • 206.
    Zineldin, Mosad
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för medicin och optometri (MEO).
    Patient self-efficacy and health2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    How patients cope with and manage their chronic condition when not under direct medical supervision makes a difference in their quality of life, their health, and their utilization of the healthcare system—and such self-efficacy and self-management can be both time-consuming and complex.

    The concept of self-efficacy is receiving increasing recognition as a predictor of health behavior change and maintenance. The purpose of this speech is to facilitate a clearer understanding of both the concept and its relevance for health behaviour, practice, healthcare quality, patient safety and quality of life in general. A patient who believes in being able to produce a desired effect can conduct a more active and self-determined life course. Health specific self-efficacy is a person’s optimistic self-belief about being capable to resist temptations and to adopt a healthy lifestyle. A co-creating Health program enables clinicians and patients to make their interactions and healthcare institutions/system as productive as possible.

  • 207.
    Zineldin, Mosad
    et al.
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    Camgoz Akdag, Hatice
    Kadir Has University, Management Department,Istanbul-Turkey.
    Quality of Health Care and Patient Satisfaction: An exploratory investigation of the 5Qs model in Turkey2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to examine the major factors affecting patients’ perception of cumulative summation. Secondly, empirically to examine the major factors affecting perception of the cumulative satisfaction to address the question whether patients in Istanbul evaluate quality of health care to be similarly or differently than the Kazakhstani, Egyptian and Jordanian patients.

    A questionnaire was distributed to people who are or were patient once in Istanbul hospitals. The questionnaire contains a total of 39 items (attributes) of newly developed five quality dimensions (5Qs). A total of 1107 complete and usable questionnaires were received. Frequency distribution, factor analysis and reliability analysis is used for analysing the data collected.

    The first three factors that are the biggest concern for people being treated in hospitals in Turkey these are: the quality of infrastructure; the quality of atmosphere, and quality of object. The specific attributes, which were perceived as concerns, were similar with all other three countries results. A cure to improve the quality for health-care services can be an application of total relationship management and the 5Qs model together with customer orientation strategy.

    The result can be used by the hospitals to reengineer and redesign creatively their quality management processes and the future direction of their more effective health-care quality strategies.

    In this research a study is described involving a new instrument and a new method, which assure a reasonable level of relevance, validity and reliability, while being explicitly change-oriented. This study argues that a patient's satisfaction is a cumulative construct, summing satisfaction with five different qualities (5Qs) of the hospital: quality of object, processes, infrastructure, interaction, and atmosphere.

2345 201 - 207 of 207
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