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  • 251.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    A sustainability manifesto for Ann-Sofie Back2014In: Ann-Sofie Back: Torsten och Wanja Söderbergs pris 2014 / [ed] Andreas Kittel, Göteborg: Röhsska Museet , 2014, 1, p. 66-78Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This short text seeks to expand and problematise the definition of sustainability in fashion (and beyond), and simultaneously illuminate the work of Ann-Sofie Back, as a whole and in its aspects, in a way that gives it a kind of dignity that other lenses have perhaps not afforded. I write from the perspective of sustainability ‘expert’, and a long-time and keen wearer of Ann-Sofie Back’s clothes. 

  • 252.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Creative Resilience Thinking in Textiles and Fashion2015In: The Handbook of Textile Culture / [ed] Janis Jefferies, Diana Wood Conroy, Hazel Clark, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, 1, p. 225-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The discourse on environmental improvement of textiles has, in the main, focused on the material realisation of a particular fabric or garment. The fashion industry is increasingly putting strategies into place to achieve cleaner and more efficient processes, and the specifications of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) work is becoming increasingly standardised. However, our relationship to textiles and fashion – in our roles as designers, makers and users, cannot be reduced to tick-box lists or explained by numbers, and in its rich diversity it defies streamlined models. The activities of designing, creating, crafting, styling, dressing and creating anew, harbour such a wealth of imagination, stored wisdom, complexity of judgement, connectedness – and pure enjoyment. Much of this is tacit knowledge and easily eludes the author of a CSR document. Yet, this chapter argues that these qualities, intrinsic to all textile work (and play), are imperative in the pursuit of truly sustainable textiles and fashion. Many opportunities are missed when all garments are treated alike, without consideration of fashion level or patterns of use. In recent years we have seen how a deep understanding of textiles and fashion can elegantly manifest itself in a series of activities and events: from hacking or customising workshops to knitting circles, from pop-up vintage shops to clothing libraries. Key to the ‘sustainability’ of these phenomena (some in themselves ‘vintage’) is that they shift the emphasis of our relationship with the textile or the garment – and thus with the world – from consuming to participating. Key is also their recognition of the importance of diversity, and their in-tuneness with both the material and symbolic dimensions of the complex fashion system. They work exactly because they embrace the cultures of textiles and fashion, instead of opposing them. This chapter explores how a systemic approach can enrich the detailed development of textiles, and how both material and symbolic notions have a place in resilience thinking. 

  • 253.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can Designers Free Design?2017In: REDO Cumulus Conference Proceedings 2017 / [ed] Cumulus, Kolding: Design School Kolding , 2017, p. 27-27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sustainability imperative requires that we REDO the products, systems and paradigms we are part of, think and do. Yet, entangled habit and fear can stop us from engaging in profound processes of change. In this talk, I want to creatively critically explore the man-madeness of the systems we live by, and design’s agile dance with them. I will draw on experiences from education, research and play to discuss both the promise and responsibility of freeing design.

  • 254.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Languaging Fashion Moments: Method 212017In: Opening up the Wardrobe: A methods book / [ed] Kate Fletcher, Ingun Grimstad Klepp, Oslo: Novus Forlag, 2017, p. 75-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes a method of languaging fashion moments, designed to explore relationships with fashion at the level of paradigms and mindsets.

  • 255.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Of Mice, Lice and Wo/men: A seasoned fashion and sustainability activist’s attempt to negotiate the awkward space of real nature and real fashion2016In: Contributor, ISSN 2002-5343, Vol. 12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 256.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Off-centre – a call for humble lessons for design: how can metadesign perspectives support education in design for sustainability?2014In: Design with the other 90%: Cumulus Johannesburg Conference Proceedings / [ed] Amanda Breytenbach and Kathryn Pope, Johannesburg: Greenside Design Center and the University of Johannesburg , 2014, p. 329-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses the notion of ‘off-centredness’ to highlight and critique a North Western conceit, hegemony and anthropocentric worldview, and an interwoven dominant construction of sustainability as ‘other’. It argues that while this generally is detrimental to social and natural systems, it also has repercussions on the specific context of education for design for sustainability. The paper proposes that pedagogy in this remit can be enriched by the positioning of ourselves - as educators and students - as humble co-learners. It offers a tentative pedagogical framework - ‘from me to we’ and from ‘product to paradigm’. This has the purpose of supporting co-learners to, from a deep understanding of, and connection with self and place, and engagement with design as physical object, form understandings of and meaningful relationships with the world as a whole. This should help enable co-learners to find agency as civilians and designers to contribute to futures of sustainability. The research has twinned applications. It informs the curricula of two new degree programmes in design at Linnaeus University, Sweden. It will result in a web-based learning resource open for general use.

  • 257.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    The futures of futures studies in fashion2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher, Mathilda Tham, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 283-292Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the potential role of Futures Studies, as manifested in fashion forecasting, in the endeavour of creating sustainability in fashion. It argues that forecasting can be helpful in advancing sustainability in two key ways: 1) by offering a framework for systemic and systematic scenario building at the nested levels of products, systems and paradigms 2) by offering a zone in the fashion industry for much needed reflection, explorations of values, imagination and envisioning. The approaches can be described as metadesign, a design of design itself, seeds for change, a collaborative and inclusive design process.

  • 258.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    What is the potential of design and gender identity for futures of sustainability?2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation explored how gender identity is manifested at the level of the designed artefact, design disciplines, design itself, as well as a dominant understanding of the world.

    It was proposed that gender identity, and particularly unlocking a binary understanding of it, may have a pivotal role in creating futures of sustainability.

  • 259.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Arvidsson, Anna-Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Blomqvist, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Bonja, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Håkanson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Salinas, Miguel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Sterte, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Svensén, Tobias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Victor, Ole
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Metadesigning Design Research: How can designers collaboratively grow a research platform?2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference, Brighton: Design Research Society, 2016, p. 1412-1430, article id 275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘How can we design a meaningful and relevant research platform that will support futures of sustainability?’ was the question guiding the two-and-a-half-year- long, co-creative and emergent metadesign process of establishing a new research platform at the Department of Design, Linnaeus University, Sweden. The meta focus on developing a whole research environment, as a design practice and design research endeavour, should be valuable for the design research community. Findings concern the viability of co-creative approaches in such a remit, negotiations of artistic/scientific research conventions, and the design institution’s position in the multi-disciplined university. The research has identified tensions and conflicts between the academic institution and construct, and the application of ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies deemed auspicious for sustainability endeavours. The paper itself is a collaborative effort between eleven of the researchers involved in developing the research platform.

  • 260.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Conclusions2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 293-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 261.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part 2 – Sustainability and fashion as seen from other places and disciplines2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 53-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 262.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part 3 – Perspectives on refining fashion from within2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 147-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 263.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part 4 – Visions of sustainability from within the fashion space2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 221-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 264.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part I – Framing and expanding fashion and sustainability2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 13-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Akiyama, Hiroko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Thelin, Angelika
    Evaluating Impact of Co-creation2018In: OpenLivingLab Days (OLLD) 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing is an ambitious research project across Sweden and Japan, with the aim of improving the experience of ageing through social design and innovation. A core challenge is loneliness, which is addressed through interventions in the remit of work/occupation, housing, mobility. The Languaging Loneliness workshop has been developed to fast forward exploration of individual and collective experience of loneliness to inform development of policies, products and services. Tests to date in Sweden and Japan indicate that the workshop itself can reduce experience of loneliness.

    The overall aim of this research is to explore evaluative frameworks and approaches fitting for the living lab community that genuinely capture innovative and unconventional methods directed at stimulating innovation and improving well being – emotional and physical, as exemplified by the Languaging Loneliness workshop.

    Expected Outcomes:

    – A comparison and map of different evaluative frameworks in the specific context of an intervention to reduce experience of loneliness.

    – Brainstorming of new approaches to evaluation in the specific context of social design and wellbeing/quality of life.

    – We anticipate that this workshop will take us further in capturing and communicating elusive emotional benefits of living lab approaches.

    Opportunity to participate in a rich discussion and community around the dilemmas, opportunities, future pathways to evaluation in the living lab context. Participants will get hands-on experience from a workshop that synergises science and art, opportunity to share experiences, engage in critical and creative discussions, and design new pathways for evaluation of co-creation, ready for trial in the home context.

  • 266.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kivilehto, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Pavic, Eva
    Transdisciplinary and transnational co-creation for health and care in an ageing society2017In: OpenLivingLab Days 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this workshop is to share and further understandings of how tools for co-creation can be used to mobilise many ways of knowing and many different knowledge holders in the context of active ageing. Participants will experience the Five Levels of Story-telling tool, to create a shared map of understandings of active ageing, and engage in a fast process of social design and prototyping in this context. Together we will explore how tools for co-creation, developed in different contexts, for example industry and academia, can be synergised to meet the demands of a quadruple helix collaboration, in the context of health, care and ageing. The workshop draws on the project Transnational Living Lab for active ageing, a collaboration between Swedish and Japanese researchers, citizens, municipalities and industry partners. This 27-month long project aims to change the experience of ageing, by targeting issues of loneliness and segregation through social design. It is funded by Vinnova, Sweden and the Japan Science & Technology Agency, Japan.

    This workshop addresses the theme of healthcare in a wide sense. We define health as the physical and emotional well-being of individuals and communities as well as the interdependent health of other species and the long-term health of resources our societies depend upon. We define care as the respectful and health supportive relations between people, between people and other species, as well as the respect an individual shows herself.

    The specific focus of the workshop is active ageing and the particular project Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing.

  • 267.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kivilehto, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Pavic, Eva
    Johanneberg Science Park.
    Akiyama, Hiroko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Sekine, Chika
    UDIT Inc (Universal Design Institute for Information Technology), Japan.
    Kai-Yun Fan, Kyle
    Japan Research Institute Ltd, Japan.
    Transdisciplinary and transnational co-creation for health and care in an ageing society2017In: OpenLivingLab Days: Health / [ed] OpenLivingLab Days, OpenLivingLab Days , 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this workshop is to share and further understandings of how tools for co-creation can be used to mobilise many ways of knowing and many different knowledge holders in the context of active ageing. Participants will experience the Five Levels of Story-telling tool, to create a shared map of understandings of active ageing, and engage in a fast process of social design and prototyping in this context. Together we will explore how tools for co-creation, developed in different contexts, for example industry and academia, can be synergised to meet the demands of a quadruple helix collaboration, in the context of health, care and ageing. The workshop draws on the project Transnational Living Lab for active ageing, a collaboration between Swedish and Japanese researchers, citizens, municipalities and industry partners. This 27-month long project aims to change the experience of ageing, by targeting issues of loneliness and segregation through social design. It is funded by Vinnova, Sweden and the Japan Science & Technology Agency, Japan.

    This workshop addresses the theme of healthcare in a wide sense. We define health as the physical and emotional well-being of individuals and communities as well as the interdependent health of other species and the long-term health of resources our societies depend upon. We define care as the respectful and health supportive relations between people, between people and other species, as well as the respect an individual shows herself.

    The specific focus of the workshop is active ageing and the particular project Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing.

  • 268.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Lundebye, Anette
    Regent’s University London, UK.
    Lockheart, Julia
    University of Wales Trinity Saint David, UK;Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can we celebrate risk-taking in co-creative and transdisciplinary processes for change?2018In: Design Research Society International Conference: Limerick, Ireland. 25-28 Juni 2018, Limerick: Design Research Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design as catalyst for change entails working with uncertainty, venturing into new ways of knowing and complex transdisciplinary collaborations. This can be provocative, messy, awkward - even frightening, since it involves an element of risk-taking. The risks may concern asserting epistemological positions lower down a normative hierarchy, saying no to a conventionally termed strong financial proposition, or exploring a new visual language. 

    Using metadesign frameworks and tools, this workshop starts from concrete examples of risky moments to explore how design situations and cultures can be more allowing and supportive of risk-taking. Specifically, the workshop uses an approach of ‘languaging’, manifested through drawing, writing, film-making and embroidery, to probe and reimagine risk-taking. The workshop draws on insights into risk-taking from the Swedish-Japanese research project Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing, the development project BOOST - proposals for housing at intersection of migrants, students and ageing population, and Design + Change - the development and implementation of visionary new degree programmes. The facilitators have long experience from setting up safe spaces for risky explorations across sectors, internationally. Workshop participants will leave with a framework and process to explore risk-taking co-creatively, new narratives of risk-taking in change work and a resource of examples of risk-taking.

  • 269.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Ståhl, ÅsaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.Hyltén-Cavallius, SaraLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Oikology - Home Ecologics: a book about building and home making for permaculture and for making our home together on Earth2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we, together, make our home on Earth in a time of mass extinction, climate change and social segregation? In this book two interplaying housing crises converge. The first concerns affordable and suitable housing for groups unprioritised by the housing market: older persons, students and migrants. The second concerns our home on Earth: science gives us but a decade to avert catastrophic climate change. This book aims at both reporting on research in the project BOOST metadesign and providing hands-on advice akin to that offered in home economics classes. The book starts performing Oikology – Home ecologics, a field of knowledge and practice in times of complexity, messiness and never finished labour of making homes together within Earth’s limits. The exploration of housing development for older persons, students and migrants in a context of sustainability has been carried out during 2016–19 through processes of co-creation in urban and rural parts of Småland, southern Sweden. Metadesign has opened up for a holistic and systemic take on home making that integrates different dimensions of sustainability and moves from the small and local to the all-encompassing. This book is for people who make homes in their personal or professional lives. It imagines an overarching paradigm of home making which starts from relationships. This is exemplified through speculative scenarios, a set of cruxes to be bounced into the planning process, methods for transdisciplinary co-creation and 29 recipes for home making.

  • 270.
    Thun, Emma
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    re:heel: prolonging the emotional life span of your shoes - sustainable fashion2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här arbetet har haft för avsikt att undersöka möjligheterna för variation och innovation inom den svenska träskoindustrin. Identiteten hos träskon har undersökts i syfte att kunna anpassa designen så för att attrahera den målgrupp som idag inte tilltalas av träskor. Utgångspunkten har varit att belysa outnyttjade möjligheter och de miljömässiga fördelarna i material och produktion.

  • 271.
    Trischler, Johann
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Nuszkowski, Kalle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    The use of gluten adhesive and removable surface finishes in rebyblable furniture panels2015In: Pro Ligno, ISSN 1841-4737, E-ISSN 2069-7430, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 613-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general problem in the recycling of furniture is that different materials and components are included within a single piece of furniture. Not only is the furniture built of components such as wood, leather, textiles, foams, steel and others but the wood component is also very often a composite made of wood, adhesives and functional additives such as water repellents or chemical substances as surface treatments. Sometimes these additives make cost-effective recycling of the composite wood difficult because of problems related to the separation of the components. The purpose of this study was to present an alternative product design for wood-based panels i.e. particleboards, which reduces or avoids many of the problems in the recycling of wood-based panels used in furniture. The results show that it is possible to produce wood-based panels in a way that facilitates the recycling of these panels although there are still some challenges which have to be dealt with. The concept as such seems to be promising. 

  • 272.
    Troyan, Cassandra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Matriarkat, andra historier och motstånd bortom kvinnoförtryck2018In: Subaltern, ISSN 1652-7046, Vol. II, no 1-2, p. 143-152Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 273.
    Valdivia, Sharon
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Harmoni - more than just a lamp2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I wanted to design a lamp in collaboration with the lighting company Örsjö Belysning AB, that would contribute to stress-reduction and calmness both through visual and functional aspects. My focus in the study and the design process was on the lamps shape and light, where my primary inspiration was taken from the qualities of water. My lamp also had to fit into Örsjö Belysnings current assortment. My research showed that rounded shapes and adjustable light are two important factors for producing calmness and well-being for the user. The result of my work was a lamp with the name Harmoni. A LED floor lamp made of brass metal and acrylic plastic, with focus on rounded shapes, lightness, flexibility and symmetry. The lamp has a unique and adjustable light emission, that gives two different kinds of light from the same source. It functions both as a floor and a wall lamp in one.

  • 274.
    Valentini, Michele
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Linneuniversitetet.
    Pursue Social and Ecological Sustainability Through Urban Foraging: Design for Foraging: Plantarum, a Digital Mapping Platform2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food production and food consumption have been shown to have a great impact on

    our ecosystem. Human beings have been exploiting the planet in order to feed

    themselves. This will have negative consequences for future life on the planet. Modern

    food production and consumption are among the main causes of natural resource

    exploitation and the problem is very likely to increase. Indeed, during the past thirty

    years, the global population has grown exponentially by almost one billion every

    decade, and it is still growing at the same pace. This demographic explosion means

    that dramatic shifts in the production and consumption of food will be required.

    Working with food is a great chance to achieve or at least lead towards a condition of

    recovering, understanding the world around us and managing our natural resourcesÅ.

    Increasing control and efficiency in food production and consumption cannot solve

    the problem. There is a much broader spectrum of causes contributing to the ecological

    decline. It is necessary to look beyond the technological and economic aspects. It is,

    therefore, necessary to focus on cultural and behavioural causes, promoting the

    involvement of local peopleÇ.

    With this in mind, this research explores the potential of urban foraging for generating

    social consciousness about ecological sustainability using design as method of

    intervention, and involving food consumers in the process of production and

    consumption of food in a more sustainable way. In order to do that, this research

    focuses on a small scale urban foraging project. In this case, by food, I refer to

    spontaneous food that grow in the natural urban environment of Växjö, and that can

    be used as a resource for citizens.

    In summary, this research aims to promote the involvement of local people and to

    support knowledge exchange in order to pursue socio-ecological sustainability.

    Engaging with more participants, the research gains the capacity of addressing

    complexity in a more coherent manner, and use its outcome as a usable resource for

    the local community that aims to promote its self-sustenance.

  • 275.
    Vikström, Anton
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Apokalypsskåpet: Förberedelsen för undergången2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

     

     

    We humans are hard on our planet, how long will it take before Mother Nature bites back and call on the Apocalypse, to reset the poisoned earth and begin anew. My project is largely about criticism of how we live today in the western world, how I with an arts and crafts, criticize an unsustainable lifestyle. I have with an exciting combination of popular culture, craftsmanship and the critical design portrayed the Apocalypse with a storage cabinet.

     

     

     

     

  • 276.
    Vuori, Sanni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Storgatan 2.0: A Concept to discuss redesign ideas for the main pedestrian street of Växjö2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Storgatan 2.0 is a study and design concept investigating the need for change of the main pedestrian street of the city of Växjö, in South Sweden. In order to propose a basis for discussions, and work as an inspiration for further renewal ideas, the design concept presents various, initial redesign visualisations of the site, Storgatan pedestrian street.

    The theoretical framework of this study leans on conducting urban studies with human-centred approach to city development. The exploratory research phase of the project was performed through several methods, including site observation, interview, and a survey for the local citizens. Also, relevant secondary research and necessary investigation of the context, Sweden, are part of the study.

    In the end, the project focuses on sorting and analysing the data, by using various visual thinking tools as a method. The outcome of the project is a proposal visualising the possibilities for Storgatan, based on the research results. The visualisations are not meant to provide detail-oriented final solutions, but defend the potential of Storgatan to become a stronger version of the main pedestrian street – an enjoyable, pedestrian-prioritised public place that is actively used and shaped by the citizens.

  • 277.
    Wadström, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Sture Samlare: En möbel till föremål du vill bevara och visa upp.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I rapporten som följer redovisas designprocessen av ett samlarskåp.

    Författarens farfar, Sture Wadström, blev 90 år. Sture var en samlare. Han

    samlade på många saker, exempelvis böcker, lås, verktyg, muttrar,

    minneslappar, pennor, lampor, gamla telefoner och porslin. Det här skåpet

    är en hyllning till honom.

    I frågeställningen ställer sig författaren frågan - Hur kan jag göra ett

    samlarskåp till en större målgrupp genom att ta inspiration från min farfar

    Sture?

  • 278.
    Wagner, Anthony
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    I Can Afford Subversive Dreams2017In: Letters to the Future: Cumulus Conference Proceedings Bengaluru 2017 / [ed] Ayisha Abraham, Pooja Sagar, Tapasya Thapa, Bangalore & Espoo: Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology & Cumulus international Association of universities and Colleges in Art, design and Media , 2017, p. 79-88Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wellbeing is a rare luxury. It can even be a fragile utopia for many so-called extreme users- people whose bodies, lives or interests are considered to fall out of the accepted norms. In its extreme, normative society ́s apprehensions, directed towards extreme users, can manifest as fears or phobias, for example, homophobia, transphobia or ableism.

    Continuously confronted with marginalisation and discrimination, extreme users have to develop considerable ambition to ensure their own wellbeing. This ambition can take the form of exploration and creation of options through play. I am a privileged extreme user because I feel I canafford to play. As an artist, I play at performing alternative realities and possible utopias. As a designer, I play at creating my own space in the world through, what I call, subversive design. That is, the subversive modification or creation of objects, languages or systems that meet the needs of users neglected by dominant norms. This paper introduces the concept of subversive design and its significance for society, using examples of transmasculine and non-binary clothing strategies. In conclusion, it argues that society could become more sustainable through merging subversive design, inclusive design and participatory design to enable wellbeing and equality for everyone.

  • 279.
    Wagner, Anthony
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Reappropriating the Monster: Potential for Perverted Assemblages2017In: Perverse Assemblages: Queering Heteronormativity Inter/Medially / [ed] Barbara Paul, Josch Hoenes, Atlanta Ina Beyer, Natascha Frankenberg and Rena Onat, Berlin: Revolver Publishing , 2017, p. 45-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Wagner, Anthony
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Wieder-Aneignung des Monsters: ein Potential für perverse Gefüge2017In: Transfer und Interaktion: Wissenschaft und Aktivismus an den Grenzen heteronormativer Zweigeschlechtlichkeit / [ed] Josch Hoenes, Michael_a Koch, Oldenburg: BIS Oldenburg, 2017, p. 241-264Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Wang, Tianyi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    International students’ stress: Innovation for health-care service2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the trend of increasing international academic exchange, the number of international students in Sweden continues to expand over years. The stress faced by international students has attracted more and more attention from university organizations and the society. This project takes the current mental health-care service for international students at Linnaeus University as the research object. Based on the participatory design and service design theory, challenges faced by the international student health-care service system and improvement opportunities were investigated through a stakeholder map, semi-structured interviews, observations, questionnaires and co-creation workshops among other methods. By introducing participatory design into the development process, an improved mental health-care service system with integrated online and offline information is presented as an example for universities’ organizations for improving the mental health-care service for international students.

  • 282.
    Wang, Yu
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Do you have time for a cup of tea?: Designing how to experience tea from three different cultures2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    4700 years ago, tea culture was born in China. For thousands of years, drinking tea has become one of the popular part of the daily life in many places around the world. Tea culture is no longer limited to the tea itself, it is also reflected in the way people drinking tea, in other words, tea ceremony. But fast-paced life has forced people to simplify the seemingly unnecessary process in their lives. The invention of the teabag replaced the complicated tea ceremony, but at the same time, the story and meaning behind drinking tea disappeared. In addition, in today's globalization, no matter where we are in the world, we always can see the spreading of culture. We can buy everything imported from other countries in the world. However, culture exists not only in people's creations but also in people's behaviors. More and more people are beginning to pay attention to the cultural significance behind the items. People began to try to experience another culture by doing rather than owning objects. So I started this project with the idea of critical design and slow design aiming to improve people's awareness of slowing down their lives through the spread of complex tea ceremony cultures. At the same time, the user experience and emotional design are also used as my guidance to stimulate people’s senses, which goes beyond reading to offer the opportunity to perform the tea rituals.

  • 283.
    Wiethüchter, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Books vs. Technology: An exploratory study of the influence they have on children's development2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of popularity of technological devices, less children engage in reading books. This paper investigates the influence of technology on young children and points out the advantages and disadvantages of being in contact with digital media on a regular basis. In contrast to that, this project reveals benefits that come from reading and being read to in early childhood. Through designerly research in forms of collaboration and a cultural probe, the essence of children’s books is getting ex- plored. Furthermore, the importance of illustration in combination to text in picture book is being discussed. By exploring the practice of creating an own illustrated children’s book, I evaluate assumptions and findings of my research. 

  • 284.
    Wiklund, Malte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Die Dreigroschenoper: En scenografi för den episka teatern år 20142014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här projektet handlar om att bearbeta den episka teaterns scenografi på ett vis

    som gör pjäsen slagstark i vår tid och anda. Jag har eftersträvat att påvisa dess

    politiska och samhälleliga relevans i kombination med att hålla den intressant för

    åskådaren som direkt upplevelse. Jag har förhållit mig till Bertolt Brecht och

    Erwin Piscators texter om teaterns utförande och dramaturgi och även den

    spektakelkultur som tar större och större utrymme i den samtida teatervärlden. Jag

    har med hjälp av läsning, skissande, modellbygge, studiebesök och samtal med

    scenografer och en teaterregissör arbetat med frågeställningen hur Bertolt Brechts

    Die Dreigroschenoper (1928) ser ut år 2014.

  • 285.
    Wu, Fei
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Cyan in mist: Sustainable packaging design for Chinese tea2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Packaging is a topic under debate and scrutiny intoday’s society, due to its obvious environmentaldetriment – but also the business opportunities – tied tominimizing or even eliminating packaging.therefore, in this thesis, the aim is to introduce Chinesetea culture to the Swedish through packaging design,By tea culture studies and surveys of the Swedishmarket, with less is more, and minimalism designtheory to design elegant and Sustainable package. Withthis design, convey the Chinese tea ceremony cultureand Zen philosophy.Through the study of Chinese tea culture, then analysiscurrent tea packaging on Chinese and Swedish markets,from the structure, color, material...every aspects ofpackaging design to show the Chinese tea culture in theSwedish market.4According to our respondents and theory, packaging isa big component in a brand's marketing strategy and tocommunicate the brand’s message and values.Marketing information can be designed into visualelements that are used on the package to communicatea message which could speak out the consumers'emotions. But packaging is a topic under debate andscrutiny in today’s society, due to its obviousenvironmental detriment – but also the businessopportunities.So, how to balance the commercial and environmentalthose two aspects and how to express sustainabledesign in my project, is the major issues I have to figureout.Key words: Chinese tea culture, less is more,sustainable packaging design, graphic design, Zen andtea ceremony, tea business marketing

  • 286.
    Xia, Xinyu
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Greenery @ Home: Design for sustainable house planting solutions2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report aims to discusse how to create more sustainable indoor greenery that can make benefit for people’s health and well-being. The accounts for sustainability in this project has three layers, which are design for people’s sustainable life (people’s health and well-being), design for sustainable indoor greenery and principles of sustainable design.

    The question I come up with in this project is “what is the sustainable relationship between people and indoor greenery”. The assumption I hope to challenge with my project is how to create a sustainable solution for house planting to bring back the nature into the daily experiences of city inhabitants by product design. As a result, people could have more sustainable and healthier life at home through living with nature in the urban settings.

    The content of this report demonstrates the whole steps (background and motivation, contexts, research, ideal generation, sketch and prototype, model making and visualization of results) towards the design results supported by theoretical studies. 

    The relevant studies I mention in this project are biophilic design, permaculture and NASA clean air study, which are related to sustainable indoor greenery and sustainable house planting relatively.

    The results obtained in this project include one product design - a planter that offers a sustainable way of cultivating health plants at home through reusing water and designing micro forest garden, and one product-based App design proposal - creating a house-planting community, in which people can communicate and support each other with sustainable house-planting tips and knowledge. 

  • 287.
    Xinyi, Lin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Recycled Posthuman Furniture-What has furniture become2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Recycled Posthuman Furniture – What has furniture become is a project that aims to explore the relationship between humans and furniture from the post-humanist perspective. Post-humanism is understood here as our capacity of giving non-human items the sense of humanity in terms of ethics and effects. Accordingly, we might consider the furniture has some certain human values. Therefore, this paper aims to demonstrate a new relationship compared with current states through a transdisciplinary design and speculative design with the goal of changing people’s understanding towards discarded furniture. Through the knowledge of current issues, this paper is tended to bring different perspectives of thoughts and questions in order to be aware of surrounding issues with the hope of changing current states to deliver a better future by chance. As the result, this paper puts forward a new sustainable lifestyle which advocates equality and inclusiveness among human and nonhuman and thus helps to solve survival crisis. Human is not the almighty of the world and all the existences are valuable as well. As humans, we must change our thinking patterns and begin accepting and treating other nonhuman equally. We are required to wake emotions that are hiding deep down in our heart and apply them on furniture and treat rejected and abandoned furniture as human. Only in this way can we decrease environmental pressure, reduce the discharge of solid waste and deal with the global crisis. Taking furniture as a start, humans should open their emotions and care for all objects that are living on the earth, focus on collective interest instead of individual interest.

  • 288.
    Yamashita Ströberg, Chikako
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How Plants Think: Rethinking human-plant relationships by theorising using concepts from posthumanism and design2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, ecology-oriented thinking is increasing in people’s minds. However, urbanisation, with its accompanying character of environmental depletion, impacts on society, ecology, and economy. It makes me think about where places in nature are situated in our everyday lives. What is nature in our lives? In our mind now, how do we think about nature? My project, How Plants Think is to address the question how city inhabitants can begin to recognise a new way of looking at plants, the human relationship to nature in everyday life in the urban domestic space. This thesis examines the design field in the context of sustainability on the environmental and societal aspects. Observing relationships between humans and plants makes a different design perspective from emotion and design to posthumanism and design that enables designers to engage with complex issues. The resulting project displays a space where people to rethink about human-plant relationships, as well as the meaning of we, humans and nature, are tangled. It is not so much about design does itself, itis about what it can show us about what it has not been done.

  • 289.
    yu, xueyi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Medicine calendar: A Design Solution to Help the Chinese Elderly Improve Their Experience of Taking Medicine2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Population aging is occurring all over the world as fertility declines and life expectancy rises.China, as the developing country with the largest population, is also experiencing thisphenomenon. However, the pension insurance system and health care system for theelderly has not been developed well enough. There is a growing need for the society toaddress the current living situation and needs of the elderly in China.The theoretical framework is design for aging and ritual designs. Sustainable thinking andhuman centered design thinking is used through the whole design process. By applyingcollaborate design methods such as interviews, some important aspects in old people’s lifewere been found out and medicine issues is the one of them. Most elderly have the issue offorgetting to take medicines and taking wrong medicines. These issues may cause greatdangers to the elderly with specific diseases such as high blood pressure.In the end, with the interaction and direct conversation with the Chinese elderly, the designsolution to medicine issues shapes the design proposal: a medicine calendar. The medicinecalendar can help the elderly remember to take their medicine properly and improve theirexperience of taking medicines. It can also draw the attention of the society to take theseniors’ life experience into account.

  • 290.
    Zberea, Andrei
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Container Paradigm: Designing structures for the future lifestyle2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 12 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a world that is becoming more and more complex with each passing year, a world where we encounter problems with home availability. This isa world where we need better temporary alternatives that are affordable. Aworld in which we need better usage of ‘space’.

    This master’s thesis subject is about the possibilities of a more simpler andmore space efficient lifestyle. A ‘home’ with which we can travel anywhere,similar to a snail or hermit crab. This lifestyle has no boundaries and wouldbe available to everyone as a choice. Similar to the “Plug-in” city by Archigram,we would be capable to move our homes and connect them.

    With this thesis I investigate how we can both have an opportunity tolower our ecological footprint and at the same time create a ‘home’ that cansupport even the financially troubled. In a way, it is an investigation how ahouse can become more opensource to everybody as a concept.

  • 291.
    Zeng, Xue
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Playground for wellness: Design proposal for Heden, Gothenburg2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to account of a process generating a city planning solution for Heden in Gothenburg. The solution is based on research from different stakeholders’ perspective, the study of reference projects and inventory of the site made by the municipality, to find an innovative feature for the site. By redefining the program of Heden from a place for mainly football and parking to a node for all kinds of physical activities, the attraction to it will be stronger, since the target group is broader. The solution is to provide a variety of functions that all fits in the concept of a public wellness center.

  • 292.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Att göra politik: Om hantverk och konst vid tiden kring 19702014In: Tillsammans: Politik, filosofi och estetik på 1960- och 1970-talen / [ed] Anders Burman & Lena Lennerhed, Stockholm: Bokförlaget Atlas, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 293.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Forming a Swedish Discourse of Design2010In: Words for Design / [ed] Haruhiko Fujita, Osaka University , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hands on movement – crafted form in dialogue2008In: Journal of Modern Craft, ISSN 1749-6772, E-ISSN 1749-6780Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Just Decoration?: Ideology and Design in Early-Twentieth-Century Sweden2012In: Scandinavian Design : Alternative Histories, London: Berg Publishers , 2012, p. 103-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 296.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Konst och hantverk: En inledning2015In: Konsthantverk i Sverige del 1, Tumba: Mångkulturellt centrum , 2015, p. 7-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 297.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Konstslöjdsmuseet och nationen2012In: Konst och nation / [ed] Hans Henrik Brummer & Martin Olin, Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    På lunchrasten: Samtal om sölning och görandets villkor sammanställda av Christina Zetterlund2019Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 299.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    The Shape of Craft: Ezra Shales,  Reaktion Books,  2018.  272 pp., 70 b&w illus., cloth, £20.00. ISBN: 9781780238227.2019In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 114-116Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kåberg, Helena
    Design history? : a workshop on current views2007In: Art bulletin of NationalmuseumArticle in journal (Other academic)
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