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  • 251.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University.
    Tilastollinen metodi ja yksilöllinen vaihtelu puhekielisen aineiston kuvauksessa: [ Statistical method and individual variation in the description of spoken language ]2003In: Låt mig ha kvar mitt språk: den tredje SUKKA-rapporten = Antakaa minun pitää kieleni : kolmas SUKKA-raportti / [ed] Raija Kangassalo, Ingmarie Mellenius, Umeå: Inst. för moderna språk, Umeå universitet , 2003, p. 151-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, MariaStockholm University.
    The Lexical Typology of Semantic Shifts2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume focuses on semantic shifts and motivation patterns in the lexicon. Its key feature is its lexico-typological orientation, i.e. a heavy emphasis on systematic cross-linguistic comparison. The book presents current theoretical and methodological trends in the study of semantic shifts and motivational patters based on an abundance of empirical findings across genetically, areally and typologically diverse languages.

  • 253.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lindberg, Inger
    Stockholm University.
    Viberg, Åke
    Stockholm University.
    Narrative Skills in Two Languages1989Report (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Nikunlassi, Ahti
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Temperature adjectives in Finnish2015In: The linguistics of temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, 1, p. 491-536Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a descriptive and theoretical account of Finnish temperature adjectives as a system consisting of a three-term core and a supplementary set. The former are unrestricted with respect to a number of grammatical and semantic parameters proposed in cross-linguistic and typological studies, whereas the latter have restricted availability in temperature subdomains or express additional semantic distinctions. In metaphorical uses of the adjectives, the base of semantic extensions is argued to be the culturally grounded emotional charge of positive or negative evaluation that gives rise to thermal preferences of different kinds of emotions. Metaphorical extensions not only involve changes in the argument structure of a term, but also significant increase in the use of syntactic frames with abstract situational semantics.

  • 255.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University.
    Den flerspråkiga världen i siffror2003In: Låt mig ha kvar mitt språk : den tredje SUKKA-rapporten: Antakaa minun pitää kieleni : kolmas SUKKA-raportti / [ed] Raija Kangassalo, Ingmarie Mellenius, Umeå: Institutionen för moderna språk, Umeå universitet , 2003, p. 13-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Svensson, Gudrun
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Evaluative language as a legitimising strategy: Swedish students give voice to anxiety and moral values2019In: Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12-13 april, 2018 / [ed] Ljung Egeland, B., Roberts, T., Sandlund, E, & Sundqvist, P., Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2019, p. 89-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we analyse reflective diary texts produced by twelve multilingual Swedish fifth-graders with immigrant background after the terrorist attack in Paris in 2015, where several employees of the magazine Charlie Hebdo were killed. Our overall aim was to study if allowing the students to discuss and reflect upon engaging events outside the school in writing educates the students in democratic values and in arguing for their opinions. Our specific aim was to analyse and discuss how the students expressed their emotions, opinions and moral values in the texts in terms of the discursive strategies of representation and legitimisation (Hart 2010), and how they actively construe the events accounted for in relation to themselves. Our results show that in the few lines of the texts, the students, with varied linguistic resources in Swedish, constructed social groups based on dichotomous ethical concepts of right and wrong and on emotional assessments legitimising their opinions and beliefs.

  • 257.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Svensson, Gudrun
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Flerspråkig muntlighet som resurs: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Språk-, läs- och skrivutveckling (Läslyftet), Muntlig kommunikation i alla ämnen, Del 3: Flerspråkig muntlighet som resurs, årskurs F-9 ]2019Other (Refereed)
  • 258.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Viberg, Åke
    Uppsala University.
    Tvåspråkighet i skolan: användandet av konnektorer och lexikala val på finska och svenska - en tillbakablick2013In: Profession, politik och passion: Inger Lindberg som andraspråksforskare - en vänbok / [ed] Monica Axelsson, Marie Carlson, Qarin Franker & Karin Sandvall, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2013, p. 89-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Karlsson, Lina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Språkutvecklande stödstrukturer: En observations- och intervjustudie om lärares arbete med läsning i SO i åk 4–52020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The curriculum for social studies is designed in a way where knowledge is assessed through the students’ expressive language skills. Much of the knowledge is also expected to be gained through reading. The purpose of this study is to examine what types of scaffolding teachers can create for students reading social studies nonfiction texts in grades 4–5. The study is based on observations and interviews with three teachers. The material was subsequently analysed based on characteristics in language development methods, showing that teachers do not emphasise the importance of language for learning when teaching. The results also show that students, to a small extent, are used as supporting resources for one another and that teachers themselves take up much of the talking space in the classroom. During structured oral text instruction teachers request short answers, that are evaluable rather than allowing time for interrogative and reflective discussions. The effect of the teacher centered teaching is that the students are passivate instead of challenged with cognitively demanding tasks where scaffolding can enable a potentially higher learning level.

  • 260.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    "Registret visar inte brottslighet": Om svenska nyhetsartiklars framställning av Polisens registrering av romer2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med undersökningen är att granska nyhetsartiklar som handlar om Polisens registrering av romer för att jämföra beskrivningen av polis respektive romer samt undersöka vilka sociala maktförhållanden och ideologiska perspektiv som speglas. I syftet ingår även att undersöka om artiklarnas framställning kan bidra till en social förändring. Materialet består av tre nyhetsartiklar som publicerades samma datum och är hämtade från Dagens Nyheter, Avpixlat och Skånska Dagbladets webbsidor. Undersökningen har sin utgångspunkt i Norman Faircloughs modell för kritisk diskursanalys som består av teoretiska premisser och metodiska riktlinjer.       Resultatet visar att Dagens Nyheter och Avpixlats artiklar är de som skiljer sig mest i beskrivningen av polis och romer. Alla artiklar speglar det maktförhållande där Polisen har en stark maktposition men har olika förhållningssätt till maktförhållandet mellan majoritetssamhället och minoritetsgruppen. Avpixlats artikel utmärker sig genom att spegla tydligt ideologiska perspektiv. Sannolikheten är större att artiklarna i Dagens Nyheter och Avpixlat kan bidra till en förändring av den sociala världen.

  • 261.
    Karlsson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Jönsson, Ulrika
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Språkutveckling i förskolan: en observationsstudie2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det huvudsakliga syftet med vår studie var att undersöka hur språklig medvetenhet kan främjas i förskolan. Studien har genomförts med 14 barn ålder 1-3 år samt tre pedagoger på en förskola i en mindre tätort. Undersökningen har genomförts med observation med hjälp av videokamera under två dagar på en förskola.

    Resultatet av vår studie visar betydelsen av pedagogens förhållningssätt till barnens språkutveckling. De var delaktiga och engagerade i barnens vardag och visade stort intresse för deras tankar och idéer. Pedagogerna var tydliga i sin pedagogroll och utmanade och uppmuntrade barnen. De använde sig av leken för att stimulera språket på ett lustfullt sätt i verksamheten. I vår undersökning stärks vår hypotes om vikten av att fånga de naturliga samtal och samspel som uppkommer i vardagen. Många gånger blev spontana händelser betydelsefulla för barnen. Det vi fann som extra intressant i vår studie var de situationer då barnen lärde av varandra.

  • 262.
    Karlsson, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Strategies for Unknown Vocabulary: An Investigation of a Swedish EFL Classroom2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 263.
    Katarina, Lazarevic
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Barcelona: La ciudad del bilingüismo: La utilización del castellano y catalán2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    First, this thesis aims to find, classify and explain the different reasons why the inhabitants of Barcelona use Catalan, Castilian or both languages according to a given situation. On the other hand, based on the results, it is intended to better understand the situation in Catalonia and the Catalans in a sociolinguistic field.

    The focus lies on answering the question “Is there a language that is preferably used by citizens living in Barcelona?”. With the use of a quantitative method analysis this thesis will reveal if there is a determining variable that influences when choosing Catalan or Castilian?

    Diferent types of resources have been used to verify and have legitimacy in the arguments presented in the thesis. The historical moments survived by the Catalan inhabitants, the identity (culture and linguistic) that they managed to preserve, and the bilingualism that exists in Barcelona, are topics that will pervade through the entire thesis.

    The result of the study shows that the respondents generally prefer to use Castilian rather than Catalan, for the reason of the origins (parents or grandparents) from outside Catalonia.

  • 264.
    Keinvall, Kristoffer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Teaching English 5 to Swedish vocational students: student attitudes, motivation and adaptation of teaching2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There has been research that suggests that an anti-studying culture is present in vocational programs in Sweden (Högberg 2009), and that teachers need to adapt their teaching to the students’ vocational interests in order to create an interest in learning (Lindahl 2015; Riley & Eriksson 2014; Smagorinsky et al. 2010). This study investigates how three teachers working at a vocational school in a rural area of Sweden teach the English 5 course. This entails investigating how the teachers perceive student attitudes, how they adapt their teaching, and also how they work to raise motivation among the students. The method used for this is semi-structured personal interviews along with a qualitative content analysis. The results of the study showed that attitudes among students are generally good with some exceptions, where lacking proficiency seems to be a factor regarding poor attitudes. It became evident that the main tool for raising motivation among the students is the adaptation of the teaching. The results also showed that some student groups are more interested in learning English than others, likely because of some students seeing English more a useful tool for their future working life. The issue of social structures regarding the Swedish educational system is also brought up. There is an implication for teachers regarding the adaptations – there has to be a balance between making vocational students interested, while still making sure they do not miss out on any content, i.e. that they get equal opportunity to learn as other students.

  • 265.
    Kelterer, Anneliese
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language. Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Head beats as pitch-accompanying visual correlates of primary and secondary lexical stress: Evidence from Stockholm Swedish compounds2018In: Proc. TAL2018, Sixth International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages, Berlin: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2018, p. 124-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interplay of (verbal) prosody with (visual) head and eyebrow movements in a 24-minute corpus of Swedish television news readings. The paper focuses on ‘double’ beat gestures, asking whether their occurrence relates to a word’s lexical prominence structure (simplex; compound), to lexical tonal prosody (Accent 1; Accent 2), or rather to prominence levels (+/- focal accent; +/- nuclear position). The results suggest that double eyebrow beats are a marginal phenomenon. Double head beats are also rare (only 28 of the 688 words annotated for head beats in our 4088- word corpus), but their usage follows a clear pattern: There is no preference for the nuclear position, but a strong preference to occur on a focally-accented compound (Accent 2), which is usually realized with two pitch peaks. In conjunction with previous findings on (single) head beats, the present results suggest that a head beat in this type of data can associate with lexical (primary or secondary) stress in case the stressed syllable is also marked by a (tonal or intonational) pitch peak.

  • 266.
    Khalid, Intisar
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning: Undervisningens vikt i inlärningen2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 267.
    Kjellström, Antonia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Twisting the standard: Non-standard language in literature and translation from English to Swedish2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Non-standard language, or dialect, often serves a specific purpose in a literary work and it is therefore a challenge for any translator to recreate the non-standard language of the source text into a target language.  There are different linguistic tools an author can use in order to convey non-standard language, and the same is true for a translator – who can choose from different strategies when tasked with the challenge of translating dialectal features. This essay studies the challenge of recreating dialectal, non-standard speech in a work of literature and compares four different translations of that same piece of literature into another language. With this purpose in mind, the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens is analysed using samples of non-standard language which have been applied to indicate a character’s speech as dialectal. The same treatment is given to four different Swedish translations. The method consists of linguistically analysing four text samples from the original novel, to see how non-standard language is represented and which function it serves, and thereafter, comparing the same samples to the four Swedish translations in order to establish whether non-standard features are visible also in the translated novels and which strategies the translators have used in order to achieve this.

    It is concluded that non-standard language is applied in the source text and is represented on each possible linguistic level, including graphology, morphosyntax, and vocabulary. The main function of the non-standard language found in the source text samples was to place the characters in contrasting social positions. The target texts were found to also use features of non-standard language, but not to the same extent as the language used in the source text. The most common type of marker was, in all five of the texts, lexical items. It was also concluded that the most frequently used translation strategy used in the target texts was the use of various informal, colloquial features. 

  • 268.
    Klingvall, Eva
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Anaphoric reference to quantifying expressions in Swedish2018In: Grammatikk i Norden 2 (GRAMINO): Oslo 15-16 May 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both (1) and (2) say that some undefined, small number of students went to the lecture, but the sentences differ in what type of quantifier is used: Några (‘some’) is a positive (upward entailing) quantifier, while (‘few’) is a negative (downward entailing) quantifier (Peters and Westerståhl, 2006).

    (1) Några studenter gick på föreläsningen.    some students went to the-lecture

    (2) Få studenter gick på föreläsningen.    few students went to the-lecture

    When referring back to ‘the students’ in (1) and (2), a difference in which students are referred to can be detected. (1) is naturally followed by (3), which talks about the students attending the lecture (the reference set), while (2) is naturally followed by (4), which talks about the students not attending the lecture (the complement set) (e.g. Moxey and Sanford, 1987). Whereas (3) can also follow (2) (although not as easily as (4)), (4) is only acceptable following (2).

    (3) De tyckte den var väldigt intressant.    they thougth it was very interesting

    (4) De stannade hemma i stället.    they stayed home instead

    Anaphoric reference to quantifiers has been investigated extensively and we know that upward/downward entailment is one factor that influences set-reference in English (see e.g. Moxey and Sanford, 1987; San- ford et al., 1996; Paterson et al., 1998; Moxey et al., 2001; Moxey, 2006; Filik et al., 2011). However, to our knowledge there are no investigations of set-reference in Swedish. As quantifiers do not always behave the same across languages (Nouwen, 2010; Tsai et al., 2014), we investigated this issue for Swedish in a semantic plausibility study where we tested whether quantified expressions gave rise to reference set or complement set interpretations.

    The material was manipulated along two dimensions: positive vs negative quantifier (några vs in (5)), and refset vs compset targeting disambiguating adjective (duktiga vs dåliga in (5)). The quantifiers included were: några (‘some’), (‘few’), många (‘many’), inte många (‘not many’), alla (‘all’), inga (‘no’), nästan alla (‘almost all’), inte alla’ (‘not all’).

    (5) Några/Få studenter skrev bra på tentan igår och att de var så duktiga/dåligasome/few students wrote well on exam yesterday and that they were so good/bad

    förbryllade professorn.confused the-professor

    The results were that positive quantifiers with anaphoric reference to the compset were judged as anomalous, and negative quantifiers with anaphoric reference to the refset were judged as anomalous, although there was more variation with regard to the negative ones. As expected, these results are in line with previous studies.

    Referenser

    Filik, Ruth, Hartmut Leuthold, Linda M. Moxey, and Anthony J. Sanford. 2011. Anaphoric reference to quantified antecedents: An event-related brain potential study. Neuropsychologia 49:3786–3794.

    Moxey, Linda M. 2006. Effects of what is expected on the focussing properties of quantifiers: A test of the presupposition-denial account. Journal of Memory and Language 55:422–439.

    Moxey, Linda M., and Anthony J. Sanford. 1987. Quantifiers and focus. Journal of semantics 5:189–206.

    Moxey, Linda M., Anthony J. Sanford, and E. Dawydiak. 2001. Denials as controllers of negative quantifier focus. Journal of memory & language 44:427–442.

    Nouwen, Rick. 2010. What’s in a quantifier? In The linguistics enterprise: from knowledge of language to knowledge in linguistics, ed. Martin Everaert, Tom Lentz, Hannah de Mulder, Øystein Nilsen, and Arjen Zondervan, 235–256. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Paterson, Kevin B., Anthony J. Sanford, Linda M. Moxey, and Eugene Dawydiak. 1998. Quantifier polarity and referential focus during reading. Journal of Memory and Language 39:290–306.

    Peters, Stanley, and Dag Westerst ̊ahl. 2006. Quantifiers in language and logic. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Sanford, Anthony J., Linda M. Moxey, and Kevin B. Paterson. 1996. Attentional focusing with quantifiers in production and comprehension. Memory &

    Cognition 24:144–155.Tsai, C.-Y. Edwin, Gregory Scontras, Kenneth Mai, and Maria Polinsky. 2014. Prohibiting inverse scope: An experimental study of Chinese vs. English.

    In Empirical Issues in Syntax and Semantics 10, ed. Christopher Pin ̃o ́n, 305–322. Paris: CSSP.

  • 269.
    Klingvall, Eva
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Referential mismatches: complement set reference2018In: MISM4TCHES (4-5 October, 2018) Universidad Cisneriana (UAH): Sala de Conferencias Internacionales. Pza. S. Diego, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this talk, we present the results of a semantic plausibility study investigating systematic mismatches in anaphoric reference to quantified expressions (QEs) in Swedish. Sentences as (1)–(2) have a similar meaning but differ in their use of quantifier: some is a positive (upward entailing) quantifier, while few is a negative (downward entailing) quantifier [1].

    (1) Some students attended the lecture.

    (2) Few students attended the lecture.

    Both (1) and (2) are sentences about students attending a lecture. However, when referring back to ‘the students’, a difference can be detected between the two sentences. (1) is naturally followed by a sentence like (3), which, like (1), is about the students attending the lecture (the reference set, REFSET). (2), on the other hand, is naturally followed by (4), which differs from (2) in being about the students not attending the lecture (the complement set, COMPSET) [e.g. 2]. While (2) can in fact be followed either by (3) or (4), is also a possible continuation of (2), the case where there is a mismatch, i.e. (4) following (2), is actually the preferred continuation [3]. For (1), the mismatch continuation ((4) following (1)) is not allowed.

    (3)  They found it very interesting.

    (4)  They stayed at home instead.

    Anaphoric reference to QEs has been extensively investigated in English and one important factor influencing set-reference is the positivity/negativity of the quantifier [see e.g. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. As quantifiers do not always behave the same across languages [7, 8], we investigated this issue for Swedish in a semantic plausibility study where we tested whether quantified expressions gave rise to REFSET or COMPSET interpretations.

    The material was manipulated along two dimensions: positive vs negative quantifier (några vs  in (5)), and REFSET vs COMPSET targeting disambiguating adjective (duktiga vs dåliga in (5)). The quantifiers included were: några (‘some’),  (‘few’), många (‘many’), inte många (‘not many’), alla (‘all’), inga (‘no’), nästan alla (‘almost all’), inte alla’ (‘not all’).

    (5) Några/Få studenter skrev bra på tentan igår och att de var såsome/few students wrote well on the-exam yesterday and that they were soduktiga/dåliga förbryllade professorn.good/bad confused the-professor

    A linear mixed model showed that positive quantifiers with anaphoric reference to the REF-SET were judged as semantically congruent, while they were judged as anomalous with ana- phoric reference to the COMPSET. For the negative quantifiers, the opposite pattern emerged: they were judged as congruent with anaphoric reference to the COMPSET but anomalous with the reference to the REFSET. There was also a difference between positive and negative QEs. The preferred continuation for positive QEs, the matching continuation, was rated as more con- gruent than the preferred continuation for negative QEs, the mismatched continuation. There were also internal differences within the groups of positive and negative quantifiers. More spe- cifically, sentences where the syntactic subject included the positive quantifier några (‘some’) were significantly different from sentences with the other positive quantifiers in the subject: when reference was made to the REFSET, the sentences were judged as semantically congruent to a lesser degree than for the other positive quantifiers. Similarly for the negative quantifiers få (‘few’) and inte alla (‘not all’): when reference was made to the COMPSET, the sentences were judged as semantically congruent to a lesser degree than for the negative quantifiers inga (‘no’) and inte många (‘not many’).

    In a follow-up study, we investigated whether the relative size of the sets, in terms of number of members, influence anaphoric set interpretation. According to Zulaica-Herna ́ndez [9], the set with the largest number of members is the one most easily referred to. In relation to our results, this would mean that några (‘some’) should pick out a smaller REFSET than the other three positive QEs, and  (‘few’) and inte alla (‘not all’) should pick out larger REFSET than inga (‘no’) and inte många (‘not many’). To test these claims, we carried out an investigation using a questionnaire where each participant was instructed to write down the number they thought a quantifier corresponded to, given a fixed total number and a specific context, as in the following example [cf. 10]:

    (6) There were 100 students in the auditory. QE of them had been there before. How many do you think had been there before? ANSWER:

    The results were that några (‘some’) was taken to pick out a significantly smaller REFSET than the other positive QEs, and inte alla (‘not all’) was taken to pick out a significantly larger REFSET than inte många (‘not many’). However,  (‘few’) was taken to pick out a smaller, rather than bigger, REFSET than inte många (‘not many’). In addition,  (‘few’) and inte alla (‘not all’) were taken to pick out REFSET of very different sizes. Thus, these studies show that anaphoric reference to QEs in Swedish behaves as in English when it comes to polarity and also, unexpectedly, that the relative size of COMPSET and REFSET plays a role in the focussing one of the two sets.

    [1]  Stanley Peters and Dag Westersta ̊hl. Quantifi- ers in language and logic. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006.

    [2]  Linda M. Moxey and Anthony J. Sanford. Quantifiers and focus. Journal of semantics, 5:189–206, 1987.

    [3]  Anthony J. Sanford, Linda M. Moxey, and Kevin B. Paterson. Attentional focusing with quantifiers in production and comprehension.Memory & Cognition, 24(2):144–155, 1996.

    [4]  Kevin B. Paterson, Anthony J. Sanford, Linda M. Moxey, and Eugene Dawydiak. Quantifier polarity and referential focus dur- ing reading. Journal of Memory and Lan- guage, 39(2):290–306, 1998.

    [5]  Linda M. Moxey, Anthony J. Sanford, and E. Dawydiak. Denials as controllers of neg- ative quantifier focus. Journal of memory & language, 44:427–442, 2001.

    [6]  Linda M Moxey. Effects of what is expec- ted on the focussing properties of quantifi- ers: A test of the presupposition-denial ac- count. Journal of Memory and Language, 55 (3):422–439, 2006.

    [7]  Rick Nouwen. What’s in a quantifier? In Martin Everaert, Tom Lentz, Hannah de Mulder, Øystein Nilsen, and Arjen Zon- dervan, editors, The linguistics enterprise: from knowledge of language to knowledge in linguistics, pages 235–256. John Benjamins, Amsterdam, 2010.

    [8]  C.-Y.EdwinTsai,GregoryScontras,Kenneth Mai, and Maria Polinsky. Prohibiting inverse scope: An experimental study of Chinese vs. English. In Christopher Pin ̃o ́n, editor, Empir- ical Issues in Syntax and Semantics 10, pages 305–322, Paris, 2014. CSSP.

    [9]  Iker Zulaica-Herna ́ndez. Complement ana- phora in Spanish: Reference and discourse re- lations. Journal of psycholinguistic research, 43(2):449–466, 2018.

    [10]  Linda M Moxey and Anthony J Sanford. Prior expectation and the interpretation of natural language quantifiers. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 5:73–91, 1993.

  • 270.
    Klingvall, Eva
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Set size and Reference2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 271.
    Klingvall, Eva
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The range of quantifiers: an empirical investigation of set size2019In: The Sign of V: Papers in Honour of Sten Vikner / [ed] Ken Ramshøj Christensen, Henrik Jørgensen and Johanna L. Wood, Aarhus: Aarhus University , 2019, p. 385-404Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Kornberg Krogh, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    When translators go barking up the wrong tree: A study of metaphor translation strategies in a dog breed book2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The translation of metaphors can cause problems for a translator since what is typical for a metaphor is that the intended meaning does not match its literal meaning, which can lead to misunderstandings. Apart from this, language differences and cultural differences can also cause problems. This essay deals with the translation of metaphors in a dog breed book from English to Swedish. The aim of the essay is to investigate which translation strategies that are used when translating metaphors and whether lexicalized and non-lexicalized source language metaphors require different translation strategies. 

    The source language metaphors were found by using the Metaphor Identification Procedure which in this study means determining the lexical units in the source text, deciding the meaning of each unit and then comparing with dictionaries to see whether the lexical unit has a more basic or contemporary meaning and if the meaning in this particular context can be understood based on the more basic or contemporary meaning. If so, the lexical unit was determined to be metaphorically used in this context. The source language metaphors were then classified according to whether they are lexicalized or non-lexicalized, based on Dickins (2005) classification.

    The study finds that the most common way of translating a source language metaphor is by paraphrasing it into a non-metaphorical expression followed by using the same or a similar target language metaphor. No clear indications of lexicalized and non-lexicalized metaphors requiring different translation strategies were found. 

  • 273.
    Kostova, Liliia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Semantiska bedömningar av svenska placeringsverb hos andraspråksinlärare: En analys av inlärare med ryska som förstaspråk2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna studie undersöktes hur man beskriver placering i den kausativa formen i ryska och hur språkinlärare med ryska som förstaspråk (L1) bedömer placeringsverb i svenska som andraspråk (L2). Analysen inkluderade både kvalitativa och kvantitativa metoder. Videoklipp med händelser tagna från ”Put & Take project” (Bowerman et al., 2004) användes för att samla in data om placeringshändelser på ryska. Resultatet visade att deltagarna använde placeringsverben (med olika prefix) lozhit’ lägga och stavit’ ställa men däremot inte sadit’ sätta, som också förekommer i det ryska språket, men som har en mer specifik funktion jämfört med exempelvis nederländska (Rakhilina och Lemmens, 2003:320). Ett webbaserat formulär där svenska placeringsverb presenteras tillsammans med bilder av olika föremål (Andersson & Gullberg, 2016) möjliggjorde insamling och analys av andraspråksinlärares bedömningar av svenska placeringsverb och även en jämförelse med data från svenska deltagare. Resultaten visade på stora likheter mellan den ryska gruppens bedömningar och tidigare undersökta svenska gruppers bedömningar. Detta tyder på att deltagare med ryska som L1 kan differentiera svenska placeringsverb, åtminstone när det gäller receptivt ordförråd och ej tidsbegränsade uppgifter. Skillnader kan eventuellt finnas på andra nivåer, t.ex. i produktivt ordförråd, något som behöver studeras vidare.

  • 274.
    Kroon, Clara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    "Tjejer är lågljudda": Elevers uppfattning av fördelningen av talutrymme och uttryckssätt ur ett genusperspektiv2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Då forskning visar på att pojkar tar en större del av klassrummets talutrymme än flickor, även då flickor har ett bättre resultat (Eliasson, Sørensen & Karlsson, 2016) syftar denna studie till att beskriva elevers uppfattning av könsmönster i muntlighet. Studien beskriver elevers uppfattning av fördelningen a v talutrymme i klassrummet ur ett genusperspektiv, identifierar vilka olikheter i sättet att uttrycka sig på baserat på könstillhörighet som eleverna upplever samt tar reda på varför dessa olikheter, enligt eleverna, existerar. Datan till studien samlades in via kvalitativa intervjuer med elever i årskurs 5 och 6. För att sammanställa datan och kunna göra jämförelser för att hitta likheter och skillnader i elevernas svar gjordes en mall med fyra kategorier där datan från intervjuerna kunde fyllas i för att sedan analyseras, en kategori i taget. Studien genomfördes med en fenomenologisk infallsvinkel vilket i denna studie innebär att det primära är att beskriva elevernas upplevelser av det undersökta. Med en fenomenologisk infallsvinkel eftersöks en gemensam kärna, likheter i elevernas beskrivningar, och dessa likheter återges i studiens resultat (Denscombe, 2018, s.187–199). Av studiens resultat framkom att eleverna i samtal om fördelningen av klassrummets talutrymme ur ett brett perspektiv upplever att det är jämnt fördelat, att läraren fördelar ordet jämnt och att elever som önskat tar ordet har en jämn fördelning. I samtal om mer specifika situationer framkom det dock att eleverna anser att det är pojkar som oönskat tar ordet, pratar rakt ut, uttalar oönskade kommentarer och svarar på flest frågor och att flickor är tillbakadragna och bara svarar på de frågor som de säkert kan svaret på. Eleverna anser att pojkar och flickor har olika språkliga former, sätt att prata på, och olikt språkligt innehåll, vad de pratar om. Varför olikheter i muntlighet mellan de två grupperna existerar finner enligt eleverna sin kärna i att pojkar vågar och att flickor är osäkra. Pojkarna och flickorna som medverkade i studien var i stor utsträckning eniga i sina svar.

  • 275.
    Källkvist, Marie
    Lund University.
    Bilingualism in the university classroom and student engagement in deep learning approaches2013In: Language Acquisition and Use in Multilingual Contexts: theory and practice / [ed] Anna Flyman Mattsson, Catrin Norrby, Lund: Lund University , 2013, p. 80-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 276.
    Källkvist, Marie
    Lund University.
    Drawing on bilingual rather than monolingual resources in the advanced-level EFL university classroom2013In: Urban Multilingualism and Education, University fo Ghent, 6-8 March 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 277.
    Källkvist, Marie
    Lund University.
    L2 Users' Agency in Classroom Interaction: The Effect of Drawing on their Own Languages2014In: Eurosla 24, European Second Language Association: Book of Abstracts, 2014, p. 90-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that interaction is a crucial source of input and serves as a pre- requisite for learning (Ellis 2008), and that L2 users’ engagement levels in interactive tasks enhance learning (Tudor 2001; van Lier 2008). Recent interaction research has shown that drawing on L2 users’ entire linguistic repertoires can enhance students’ levels of engagement in class discussions (cf. Author 2013), and that flexible, multilingual practices enhances learning (Hall & Cook 2012; Hornberger 2002). We also know from a number of recent studies that multilinguals naturally activate other languages known to them as they engage with L2/L3/L4 learning tasks (Cenoz & Gorter 2011; Falk & Bardel 2010; García 2013).

    Building on this research and framed by the Interaction Hypothesis (Gass 2003) and task-based language teaching (e.g. van den Branden 2007), the present study presents a detailed, qualitative analysis of teacher-led interaction aimed to enhance the learning of L2 morphosyntax in three bilingual classrooms at a Swedish university. It forms part of longitudinal study, combining ethnographic data collection with an experimental design. Three groups of students (CEFR level B2) were taught L2 grammar over one semester by the same instructor, who also audio- recorded the lessons. Two of the three groups were formed by matched-pair random assignment, while the third group was an intact group. In two of the groups, bilingual grammar tasks were used, typically involving L1-to-L2 translation tasks, whereas in the third group exactly the same grammar structures were covered using tasks without involving L1-L2 comparison or translation, except for the end-of-course exam preparation session. The analysis focuses on examining student and teacher agency as an effect of the whether the tasks were bilingual (L1-to-L2 translation) or monolingual (in L2 only), and as an effect of properties of the three different groups. The data were examined using Nexus Analysis (Scollon & Scollon 2004), which is (critical) discourse analysis of ethnographic data, focusing on social actions in groups (in this case student-initiated communicative turns). The results reveal that student interaction patterns in the three different groups differed as an effect of the different tasks. Consistently across all three groups, student-initiated turns were more common when students drew on their L1, and there was a tendency for students who otherwise remained quiet to initiate discussion in the L2 when having the opportunity to draw on their L1. The analysis also shows a certain amount of variation between the groups when engaging with the same task. The nexus analysis of the interaction patterns presented offers a socio-culturally context-sensitive way of understanding why and how teacher-student and student-teacher interaction developed and differed between the three groups. 

  • 278.
    Källkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hult, Francis
    Lund University.
    Planning for Bilingualism at a Swedish University2013In: 9th International Symposium on Bilingualism, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 10-13 June 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Källkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hult, Francis
    Språklagen och skapandet av utrymme för svenska, engelska och andra språk vid ett universitet2014In: ASLA-symposiet, Södertörns högskola, 8-9 maj 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Källkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hult, Francis
    Lund University.
    Unpacking Parallel-Language Use in Language Policies at Swedish Universities2013In: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Language Policy and Planning Conference 2013, University of Calgary, 5-7 September, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Källkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hult, Francis M.
    Implementational Space for Multilingualism at a Swedish University Following the Passing of the Swedish Language Act2015In: American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL), March 21–24, 2015, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, Canada, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses ethnography of language policy and discourse analysis to examine implementational space created for Swedish and other languages in a university language policy and how these relate to the Swedish Language Act. Results show that considerable space is made for languages other than Swedish in teaching and research.

  • 282.
    Källkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Hult, Francis M.
    Multilingualism as Problem, Right, or Resource?: Negotiating Space for Languages Other than Swedish and English in University Language Planning2020In: Language Perceptions and Practices in Multilingual Universities / [ed] Maria Kuteeva, Kathrin Kaufhold, Niina Hynninen, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Kümmerling-Meibauer, Bettina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Surmatz, AstridLinnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Beyond Pippi Longstocking: Intermedial and International Aspects of Astrid Lindgren's Works2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Early nineteenth-century pauper letters2014In: Letter Writing and Language Change / [ed] Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, Richard J. Watts, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Englannin käyttöä ja väärinkäyttöä : Kielentutkija ja oikeakielisyys: Use and abuse of English2015In: Englannin aika: Elävän kielen kartoitusta: The Time of English : Charting a Living Language / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen & Matti Rissanen, Helsingfors: Helsingfors universitet, 2015, p. 172-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 286.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    English on the move: What’s beyond modernity and internationalism?2015In: Dimensions of Sociolinguistic Landscapes in Europe: Materials and Methodological Solutions / [ed] Mikko Laitinen, Anastassia Zabrdoskaja, Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 105-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 287.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Indefinite pronouns with singular human reference: Recessive and ongoing2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 137-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 288.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Ongoing changes and advanced L2 use of English: Evidence from new corpus resources2016In: Corpus Linguistics on the Move: Exploring and Understanding English through Corpora / [ed] María José López-Couso, Belén Méndez-Naya, Paloma Núñez-Pertejo, Ignacio M. Palacios-Martínez, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 59-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the global spread of English by charting new ways of studying the expansion and diversification of English to non-native contexts. The research builds on the idea that the ongoing globalization of English calls for new empirical approaches to contact, variability, and the interplay of the established varieties andnew forms of English. It tests the methods of recent and ongoing grammatical change in investigating advanced non-native use. This methodology, combining historical linguistics and variationist sociolinguistics in a statistically sensitive corpus-based framework, has previously been used in the study of native varieties, but not in non-nativecontexts. The chapter first presents the compilation of a new multi-genre corpus ofadvanced English texts in non-instructional settings in Sweden and Finland, and then provides three case studies which examine how various lexico-grammatical variablescurrently undergoing change are adopted in non-native contexts. The results show substantial differences between traditional learner evidence and advanced non-native English in use, and indicate that the non-native evidence lands somewhere in betweenthe most advanced variety, standard American English, but ahead of other native and non-native inner and outer circle varieties. The findings therefore suggest that the processes and mechanisms of variability emerging in the globalization of English are more complex than previously thought.

  • 289.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Ongoing changes and global Englishes: Exploring new corpus resources2013In: ICAME 34, English corpus linguistics on the move: Applications and implications, Santiago de Compostela, Book of Abstracts, 22-26 May 2013, 2013, p. 193-194Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has recently been plenty of interest in recent and ongoing grammatical changes in English(e.g. Leech et al. 2009). Using evidence of a range of structures, these studies have identifiedvarious long-term trends, such as colloquialization and ‘Americanization’ in the writtenstandard English of the late twentieth century. Digital resources in the form of the Browncorpora have provided a sound empirical basis for this kind of work because they free anobserver from impressionistic and anecdotal data and enable taking the stylistic variation intoaccount (Mair 2008).Most of this work on recent changes has focused only on American and British English. Thispresentation shifts the focus to global Englishes, viz. English as a lingua franca (ELF) and otherL2-varieties of English (Seidlhofer 2011, Mauranen 2012), and asks how these currentgrammatical changes are reflected and adopted in use in the present-day global Englishes. Suchan approach is motivated because the number of speakers of English globally far exceeds thenumber of native speakers. There has recently been emerging interest in the changes in the othervarieties (cf. Filppula (2012) on the auxiliaries in the outer circle varieties; Laitinen (2011) onpatterns of verbal complementation in lingua franca Englishes).This presentation approaches recent grammatical changes in global Englishes through the existing corpus resources. It highlights the need for developing and collecting new materialsthat reflect the global spread of English. The existing (global) English corpora are, for variousreasons, not suitable for investigating recent and ongoing changes. For instance, the existinglearner corpora are limited to few text types, and the corpus design in the ICE corpora requiresheavy modifications for the global context. The two ELF corpora only contain spoken language,and relying solely on spoken evidence may lead to incomplete conclusions on variabilitybecause it is often necessary to compare spoken and written data side-by-side for determiningthe direction of change (cf. Mair 2007). This presentation discusses the corpus design andcompilation principles of today’s written ELF corpora. The guiding principle in this work is thatthe corpus design should be suitable for a range of geographic contexts in which English isemerging or has emerged as a communicative medium. I will discuss the collection process oftwo databases that represent English uses in Sweden and in Finland. These databases arecurrently in compilation, with the aim that they would provide good practices for developing anew generation of global English text corpora. I will then use these two databases to provideevidence of adverbial connectives of ANY/EACH/EVERY TIME in the sense of ‘whenever’. Theseconnectives have undergone grammaticalization in the native varieties (Brinton 2007), and I will illustrate how this development is reflected in global Englishes.

  • 290.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Ongoing changes in English modals: On the developments in ELF2016In: New Approaches in English Linguistics: Building Bridges / [ed] Olga Timofeeva, Sarah Chevalier, Anne-Christine Gardner, Alpo Honkapohja, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 175-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates how ongoing grammatical change, widely documented in various native varieties, is adopted in advanced lingua franca use of English (ELF). It incorporates a broader perspective on ELF than previously, seeing it as one stage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emerging in spoken interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genre corpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in lingua franca use. It is followed with a case study investigating quantitative patterns in a set of core and emergent modal auxiliaries. The results suggest that in cases of substantial recent changes in the core varieties of English, lingua franca uses polarize the diffusion of change. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angle to lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to ELF but also to ongoing grammatical variability.

  • 291.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Ongoing grammatical changes and global Englishes2013In: Changing English: Contact & variation, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks into how current grammatical changes in English are reflected and adopted in use in the present-day global Englishes, i.e. in lingua franca and in other L2-varieties of today. The study of ongoing changes in English has emerged as a lively field recently, and the studies of lexico-grammatical variability have identified a range of patterns of contemporary change (Leech et al. 2009; Mair & Leech 2006). Much of this research has focused on the inner core varieties of English, and only recently have we seen investigations targeting changes in the new Englishes (see Filppula 2012; Laitinen 2011). The main argument is that more emphasis should be placed on exploring the diachronic embedding of variability in today's global Englishes. This paper presents evidence on two current and ongoing changes: (a) variability in the modals of will/shall (Leech 2003) and (b) changes in the adverbial connectives of every/each/any time (Brinton 2007). I will draw evidence from two databases that represent English uses in Sweden and in Finland. These databases are currently in compilation, with the aim that they would provide good practices for developing a new generation of global English text corpora.

  • 292.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Päivitys 20142015In: Englannin aika : Elävän kielen kartoitusta: The Time of English : Charting a Living Language / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen & Matti Rissanen, Helsingors: Helsingfors universitet, 2015, p. 190-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Sociolinguistics in Finland: A brief overview of the discipline2013In: Sociolinguistica: Internationales Jahrbuch fuer Europaeische Soziolinguistik, ISSN 0933-1883, E-ISSN 1865-939X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 187-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Oxford English Dictionary2015In: Englannin aika. Elävän kielen kartoitusta: The Time of English. Charting a Living Language / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen & Matti Rissanen, Helsingors: Helsingfors universitet, 2015, p. 194-194Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    “Tyranny of writing” and English corpus linguistics: What to do with the new mediated and vernacular genres?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation discusses ongoing research that focuses on exploring grammatical variability in advanced L2 uses of English in the expanding circle, i.e. in countries in which English does not have an official role but where it is widely used as a linguistic resource in today’s globalized world. This research is corpus-based, and my presentation focuses on the sources of evidence using the notion of “tyranny of writing”. For instance, up to today, most of the existing corpus materials from the expanding circle consist of learner corpora which are collections of short written essays collected from institutional settings. They are excellent tools but exclude a wide range of new mediated and vernacular genres. Similarly, the corpora from the inner core varieties of English, i.e. American and British English, contain materials from a variety of formal written genres, covering texts types of news, academic and fiction, etc. This presentation discusses how to make use of these best practices in English corpus linguistics to create a set of corpora of English use in the expanding circle. These new corpora should ideally represent not only formal written genres but also a wide range of vernacular genres, such as blogs, news-letters, Twitter messages, where English is used, but at the same time, these new sources of evidence should be comparable with the existing corpora in order to ensure diachronic comparisons.

  • 296.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    What happens to ongoing change in multilingual settings?: A corpus compiler’s perspective on new data and new research prospects2017In: Challenging the Myth of Monolingual Corpora / [ed] Arja Nurmi, Päivi Pahta, Tanja Rütten, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, p. 58-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Auer, Anita
    Utrecht University.
    Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (England, c. 1750–1835): Approaching Linguistic Diversity in Late Modern English2014In: Contact, Variation, and Change in the History of English / [ed] Simone E. Pfenninger, Olga Timofeeva, Anne-Christine Gardner, Alpo Honkapohja, Marianne Hundt and Daniel Schreier, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, p. 187-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Histories of linguistic variability and language standardization in Late Modern England have predominantly focused on the well-educated layers of society. This paper aims at providing a more complete overview of language use during that period by focusing on the lower social ranks. The discussion will be based on the corpus Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (LALP), which contains more than 2,000 letters of application for poor relief from the period c.1750−1835. The first part of the paper describes the corpus in some detail. The second part discusses new research questions that the lower-class material raises; this will be illustrated by two case studies. In the first study, the material will be viewed from the point of view of spelling acquisition and fossilization. The second case study focuses on providing diachronic time depth to some of the current issues discussed in the sociolinguistics of globalization (Blommaert 2010), such as mobility and developing literacies.

  • 298.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Charting New Sources of elf Data: A Multi-Genre Corpus Approach2019In: From Data to Evidence in English Language Research / [ed] Carla Suhr, Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 326-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses research that charts new lingua franca English data and broadensthe scope of written elf corpora. We illustrate that, apart from the academic domain,there exist various written genres in non-native contexts in which English is used as asecond language resource alongside native languages. These uncharted data can provideus with new ways of approaching the ongoing globalization of English. The newapproach incorporates a broader perspective on elf than previously, seeing it as onestage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emergingin interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genrecorpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in linguafranca use. It is followed by three case studies investigating quantitative patterns ofongoing change in elf. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angleto lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to elf but also to ongoinggrammatical variability. It shows that the traditional and canonized way of seeing nonnativespeakers/writers is not sufficient, nor is the simplified view of norm dependency of non-native individuals.

  • 299.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Ongoing grammatical change and the new Englishes: Towards a set of corpora of English uses in the expanding circle2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 300. Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    The Nordic Tweet Stream: A Dynamic Real-Time Monitor Corpus of Big and Rich Language Data2018In: DHN 2018 Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 3rd Conference: Proceedings of the Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 3rd Conference Helsinki, Finland, March 7-9, 2018 / [ed] Eetu Mäkelä, Mikko Tolonen, Jouni Tuominen, CEUR-WS.org , 2018, p. 349-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the Nordic Tweet Stream (NTS), a cross-disciplinarycorpus project of computer scientists and a group of sociolinguists interestedin language variability and in the global spread of English. Our research integratestwo types of empirical data: We not only rely on traditional structured corpusdata but also use unstructured data sources that are often big and rich inmetadata, such as Twitter streams. The NTS downloads tweets and associatedmetadata from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. We first introducesome technical aspects in creating a dynamic real-time monitor corpus, andthe following case study illustrates how the corpus could be used as empiricalevidence in sociolinguistic studies focusing on the global spread of English tomultilingual settings. The results show that English is the most frequently usedlanguage, accounting for almost a third. These results can be used to assess howwidespread English use is in the Nordic region and offer a big data perspectivethat complement previous small-scale studies. The future objectives include annotatingthe material, making it available for the scholarly community, and expandingthe geographic scope of the data stream outside Nordic region.

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