lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
45678910 301 - 350 of 1759
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Carter, Oliver
    et al.
    Birmingham City University, UK.
    Gustafsson, TommyLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.Larsson, MariahLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Porn Studies, Volume 9, Issue 1 (2022): Transnational Porn2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Barbarella, An Unintentional Beacon of Retro Futurism.2023In: Barbarella Collectible Booklet: Limited edition with DVD and Blue-Ray / [ed] Jasper Sharp, London: Arrow Films , 2023Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 303.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Edith Head2023In: The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Film and Television Costume Design: Costume Designer Biographies / [ed] / [ed] Deborah Nadoolman Landis, London: Bloomsbury Visual Arts , 2023Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Catalán-Morseby, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Chilenska flyktingar i Sverige efter 1973: En studie om chilenska flyktingars upplevelser av militärkuppen i Chile och efterföljande flykt till och flyktingmottagning i Sverige2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this essay is to study Chilean refugees’ experiences of the 1973 military coup in Chile as well as the subsequent escape to, and reception of refugees in Sweden. In order to accomplish the purpose of the essay, six Chilean refugees who arrived in Sweden after 1973 have been interviewed and have generated answers which are compared to previous research in this field. Furthermore, written history tends to describe people in power as well as warfare in general. Therefore, by using oral history as a method in this study to investigate Chilean refugees’ experiences, a more nuanced and democratic version of what happened could appear. As a result, this study mostly concurs with previous research made in this field, thus arguing that political and social injustices triggered the Chilean refugees’ involvement in Allende’s popular unity in Chile. When Allende was overthrown by armed forces and a merciless persecution took place, the people interviewed in this study decided to escape to another country. The goal with the escape was to wait until the situation had calmed down and then, return to Chile. While in Sweden, they decided to continue the struggle towards a free and democratic Chile. However, as time passed during the long-term dictatorship, those dreams faded.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Chilenska flyktingar i Sverige efter 1973
  • 305.
    Catalán-Morseby, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Ängöskolan: Förlägging för lettiska flyktingar i Kalmar åren 1944 till 19452011Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsatsens syfte är att undersöka Ängöskolans tid som baltiskt flyktingläger i Kalmar under den tidiga efterkrigstiden. I arbetet med uppsatsen har jag studerat listan över inskrivningsliggare som redogör för antalet registrerade flyktingar på Ängöförläggningen i Kalmar med avseende till ålder, kön, yrke/klass, civilstånd och generation. I målet att besvara hur Kalmars flyktingverksamhet organiserades och dess roll som arbetsinstitution har främst inkommande skrivelser samt intendentens skrivelser i form av brev studerats. Jag har även jämfört mina resultat med Kalmar hjälpkommittés verksamhet för judiska flyktingar och Skånes baltiska flyktingmottagning och arbetsmarknadspolitiska åtgärder under den tidiga efterkrigstiden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 306.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Afterword: The Flow of Objects at the Political Edges: a postscript2019In: Objects and Frontiers in Modern Asia: Between the Mekong and the Indus / [ed] Lipokmar Dzuvichu & Baruah, Manjeet, New Delhi; London: Routledge, 2019, p. 199-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on the geographies between the Mekong and the Indus, this book brings objects to the centre of enquiry in the understanding of modern Asian frontiers. It explores how a range of objects have historically been significant bearers and agents of frontier making. For instance, how are objects connected to aspects of state making, social change, everyday life, diplomacy, political and ecological worlds, capital, forms of violence, resistances, circulations, and aesthetic expressions?

    This book seeks to interrogate and understand the dynamism of frontiers from the vantage point of objects such as salt, rubber, tea, guns, silk scarves, horses, and opium. It attempts to explore objects as sites of encounter, mediation, or dislocation between the social and the spatial. The book not only locates objects in the specificities of frontier spaces, but it also looks at how they are produced, circulated, and come to be intricately linked to a wide range of people, institutions, networks, and geographies. In the process, it explores how objects traverse and come to inhabit multiple historical, cultural, and geographical scales.

    This book will be of interest to researchers and academics working in areas of history, social and cultural anthropology, Asian studies, frontiers and borderland studies, cultural studies, political and economic studies, and museum studies. 

  • 307.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Anna Lindberg: Experience and Identity. A Historical Account of Class, Caste and Gender among the Cashew Workers of Kerala2002In: Kvinnovetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 0348-8365, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 91-94Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Anticipating Independent India: The Idea of the Lutheran Christian Nation and Indian Nationalism2006In: Svensk Missionstidsskrift, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 521-542Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university.
    Anticipating Independent India: The Idea of the Lutheran Christian Nation and Indian Nationalism2009In: India and the Indianness of Christianity: Essays on Understanding—Historical, Theological, and Bibliographical—In Honor of Robert Eric Frykenberg / [ed] Richard Fox Young, Grand Rapids, MI, and Cambridge: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2009, p. 196-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Battles over Law: The (Re-)formation of Legal Rights to Nature in the Nilgiri Hills, Early Nineteenth Century2018In: In Quest of the Historian's Craft: Essays in Honour of Prof. B.B. Chaudhuri / [ed] Arun Bandopadhyay, Sanjukta Das Gupta, New Delhi: Manohar Publishers & Distributors, 2018, p. 391-406Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Battles over Law: The (re-)formation of legal rights to nature in the Nilgiri Hills, early nineteenth century2009In: Proceedings of the Biodiversity and Livelihoods Conference 26th-28th March 2009 Coonoor, The Nilgiris / [ed] Rajyashree Dutt, Janet Seeley and Pratim Roy, Darwin initiativ , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 312.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Becoming and being a subject: An introduction2017In: Subjects, Citizens and Law: Colonial and independent India / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, Sanjukta Das Gupta, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question appears simplistic: who is the subject? When asked within the frame of polity and governing institutions, the subject is the individual who is subjected to the conditions of rule that are instituted in a polity. But as soon as the question moves from the abstract to the concrete, the answer will be anything but simple. The identity of the subject, the stipulated conditions, the nature of rule and the polity itself will immediately come into question. At whatever time and place this question is posed to India’s recent history, the answers will never be identical. There are many ways of representing subjecthood when observed through historiographical or historical lenses. Within the grand narrative of Indian colonial history, from the cradle to its imperial grave, and in independent India, the Indian subject is continuously being reconstituted in complex ways and varied contexts. 1

    In the collective work of this volume, the authors have entered into a conversation about law and legal practice, and how the two have influenced and in fundamental ways shaped the nature of subjecthood in the formation of modern India. From different positions and in different contexts across north India, from the north-west to the north-east, the studies centre on the question of how the subject comes into being. The studies speak both to the historiographical and to the historical contexts, and both to how subjects have been represented across time and to specific historical events and trajectories. The studies refer, on the one hand, to the subject in legal and political terms, as a person who is dependent on a particular regime, and, on the other, to the subject position of individuals and collectives as it is shaped, negotiated, asserted and questioned. Rather than being seen as a once-and-for-all event, as an immediate consequence of conquest, naturalisation or birth, in this volume subjecthood is seen as a relationship that is being continuously reconstituted. In our usage, it is a relative term. It is a process over time in which the subject emerges in a particular context and relative to the larger complex of governing institutions and performance of rule.

  • 313.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University.
    Bonds lost: subordination, conflict and mobilisation in rural south India c. 1900-19701997 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation examines the transformation of rural social relations in the highlands of south India during a period of rapid agricultural change. Long before the expansion of commercial crops in agriculture, the landowning community of farmers and the landless agricultural labourers had been closely related to each other. During the economic change, the need of these labourers increased on the farms. As the labourers were also leather workers, their skills were indispensable to reassure the farmers of the increasingly necessary irrigation.

    By a combination of a variety of government, mission and oral sources, the thesis shows that, between 1880s and 1930s, competition for labour scaled up in the region and agricultural labourers were increasingly tied by advance payments to work for a farmer. This is known as the pannai or farm system and included both duties and rights for the labourers. On account of this, economic expansion gained support and social control was upheld. However, even after preconditions had been made available to achieve a more profitable farming by replacing permanent by casual labourers a substantial, permanent labour force was still employed on the farms. In the late 1930s and 1940s, kinship-wise mobilisation among the Madhari labourers to convert to Christianity was met by strong and sometimes violent resistance. Every movement they made to break with Goundar authority was realised as a threat. Thus, during a decade, social rationality was given priority over economic rationality by the farmers. A severe six-year long drought contributed to end this situation. The farmers finally electrified irrigation and dismissed the major part of their permanent labour force. Thus, the labourers not only gained free mobility but simultaneously lost the rights and security that had been attached to their bonds.

  • 314.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Bonds Lost: Subordination, Conflict and Mobilisation in Rural South India c. 1900-19702020 (ed. 2)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social relations in rural south India have often been studied from either a perspec­tive of labour and economic exploitation or one of dominance and subordination in terms of caste or exercise of political power. In Bonds Lost, the author argues that relations between landowners and agricultural labourers cannot be understood without taking account of both the economic and the social logic of the relationship. From a variety of government, mission and oral sources, the author analyses the transformation of rural social relations in the central parts of the highlands in today`s western Tamil Nadu between c. 1900 and 1970. Throughout the expansion of commercial crops in agriculture, in particular of the cultivation of cotton, the farming community of Goundar and the agricultural labourers of the Madhari leather-working community have been closely related to each other. There has been a mutual, however, uneven dependence between the two; the farmers being dependent on the skills of leather workers to manage the irrigation, the Madhari equally dependent on the farmers for their own survival. Until the 1930s, competition for labour scaled up in the region and agricultural labourers were increasingly tied by advance payments to work for a farmer. On account of this, economic expansion gained support and social control was upheld. However, even after preconditions had been made available to achieve a more profitable farming by replacing the permanent by casual labourers, a substantial, permanent labour force was still employed on the farms. In the late 1930s and 1940s, kinship-wise mobilisation among the Madhari labourers to convert to Christianity was met by strong and sometimes violent resistance. Every movement they made to break with Goundar authority was seen as a threat. Thus, during the decade, social rationality was given priority over economic rationality by the farmers. A severe six-year-long drought put an end to this situation

  • 315.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bufflarnas bete försvinner : Todafolket i Nilgribergen trängs bort från sin mark2002In: Tidskrift om Indien, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Bhutan och Maldiverna, ISSN 0282-0463, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 28-30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Circular Migrations, Capital, and Opportunity: A Global History of Scandinavia and India at the Industrial Turn, an Introduction2022In: The Imperial Underbelly: Workers, Contractors, and Entrepreneursin Colonial India and Scandinavia / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, London and New Delhi: Routledge, 2022, p. 1-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like a Pandora’s box, a recently found wooden-chest in the attic of an iron estate in south Sweden has opened a window to life and work at the levels of manual labourers and subcontractors. They worked on the large railway construction projects in nineteenth-century India. The documents hidden in the chest have also given rise to a revision of Scandinavian history and, especially, of the poverty-stricken region in which the estate lies as it ties Sweden into the colonial history of the British Empire. The chapter provides an overview and a context both to the key-places of these large transformations and to the historical trajectories of political and economic transformation in Denmark, Berar in western India, and south Sweden that also the Stephens’ family members experienced. It explains a global history that connects southern Scandinavia and western India via colonial processes of conquest, extraction and production, infrastructure projects, labour, capital, and entrepreneurship and, not least, the profound landscape change that followed. As an introduction to this volume, it shows how capital flows, mobility and migration characterised change. Joseph Stephens, the lead character of the volume due to the archive he produced, played a small but important part in these changes and his life was transformed by them. Via his and his family members’ lives, the chapters enter into histories of metropolitan and rural western India and Scandinavia at the time of intensive imperial infrastructure expansion and in the midst of the economic turn in south Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Circular Migration
  • 317.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Circular Migrations, Capital, and Opportunity: A global History of Scandinavia and India at the Industrial Turn, an Introduction2022In: The Imperial Underbelly: Workers, Contractors, and Entrepreneurs in Colonial India and Scandinavia / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2022, 1, p. 1-25-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Circular Migrations, Capital, and Opportunity: A global History of Scandinavia and India at the Industrial Turn, an Introduction2024In: The Imperial Underbelly: Workers, Contractors, and Entrepreneurs in Colonial India and Scandinavia / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, Abingdon, New York: Routledge, 2024, 2, p. 1-25-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 319.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Colonial Frontiers2023In: The Routledge Companion to Northeast India / [ed] Jelle J. P. Wouters and Tanka B. Subba, Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2023, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text focuses on the early encounters, 1790-1840, between the officers in the British East India Company and landowners and rulers of the local polities. Estate holders, kingdoms and small polities were pressured to comply with British interests for minerals and control of communication routes. Large revenue settlements are discussed in view of the estate holders’ Mughal rights, and the impact of surveys for getting control of people and land shows the importance of modern science in imperial conquest. Finally, the British colonial government and private capital simultaneously intensified mineral extraction and commercial control of markets and routes, including attempts at securing the land routes to reach China’s markets.

  • 320.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Conflicting Constructions of Community: Land Conflicts in 19th Century Nilgiris2010In: Environment, Livelihoods and Development in Modern South Asia: A Comparative Framework, New Delhi: Manohar Publications , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 321.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Corridors, Networks, and Pathways in India’s Colonial Northeast2016Book (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Den kände främlingen1998In: Främlingar - ett historiskt perspektiv / [ed] Anders Florén & Åsa Karlsson, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, Historiska institutionen , 1998, p. 161-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 323.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Environment, Knowledge and Gender: Local development in India's Jharkand: Authored by Sarah Jewitt2004In: Geografiska Annaler, Series B, ISSN 0435-3684, Vol. 86B, no 2, p. 138-140Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 324.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Ett slavarbete värt respekt: Recension av En världshistoria om ofrihet. Slaveri från 1800 till nutid, Dick Harrison, Historiska Media 20082008In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 29 septArticle, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    TRILOGI. Dick Harrison har kommit fram till nutid i sitt arbete om ofrihetens historia. Hans vida definition av slaveri skapar analytiska problem, men som livsverk är det respektingivande. Det är en mäktig insats att omvandla en så omfattande litteratur till en prosa som aldrig blir tråkig, skriver Gunnel Cederlöf.

  • 325.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University.
    Fixed boundaries, fluid landscapes: British expansion into Northern East Bengal in the 1820s2009In: Indian economic and social history review, ISSN 0019-4646, E-ISSN 0973-0893, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 513-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on questions of the formation of new polities and ruler-subject relations as a result of British colonial conquest of northern east Bengal and neighbouring states in the early nineteenth century. It emphasises ecological and climatic structuring conditions and is a contribution to research on changing spatial relations and transactions, transformation of hill-plain relations, and collisions between synoptic political visions and knowledge systems, and their implementation on particular landscapes and people. Particular attention is given to the time and place-bound formation of law for the control and access of land and natural resources. The study thus explores the tense relationship between a fluid, continuously changing landscape and the fixed notions of boundaries, government control and polities held by the British East India Company (EIC) and which they strove to implement in military and fiscal control in northern east Bengal. The study suggests that the means and principles by which bureaucratic control was established formed the basis for a form of fiscal citizenship whereby the subject was acknowledged as a person with rights and in communication with government. Such control was established in the formet Nawab's territories which mainly consisted of plains and therefore were landscapes that were intended to be agrarian. It is further suggested that when the neighbouring independent states and autonomous villages were brought under EIC rule, this was done by other means which in turn shaped different ruler-subject relations and eventually paved the way for the formation of dual polities under one government.

  • 326.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University ; Shiv Nadar University, India.
    Fixed Boundaries, Fluid Landscapes: British Expansion into Northern East Bengal in the 1820s2018In: Blending Nation and Region: Essays in Honour of Late Professor Amalendu Guha / [ed] Sajal Nag, Ishrat Alam, New Delhi: Ratna Sagar , 2018, p. 128-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University.
    Forests and Ecological History of Assam, 1826-2000 by Arupjyoti Saikia: Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 20112012In: Seminar New Delhi: a monthly symposium, ISSN 0971-6742, Vol. Dec, no 640Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University .
    Founding an Empire on India's North-Eastern Frontiers, 1790-1840: Climate, Commerce, Polity2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a richly detailed historical work of the unsettled half-century from the 1790s to the 1830s when the British East India Company strove to establish control of the colonial north-eastern frontiers spanning the River Brahmaputra to the Burmese border. It offers a much-needed reframing of regional histories of South Asia away from the subcontinental Indian mainland to the varied social ecologies of Sylhet, Cachar, Manipur, Jaintia, and Khasi hills.As a mercantile corporation, the EIC aimed at getting in command of the millennium-old over-land commercial routes connecting India and China. The study specifically engages with the early nineteenth century explorations of trade across Burma. Simultaneously, the Mughal diwani grant compelled the EIC to govern territory. Drawing on extensive research, the study demonstrates the incompatibility of bureaucratic power, the complex socio-economic networks of authority, and the ever-changing landscapes of the region. In a monsoon climate, where rivers moved and land was inundated for months, any attempt to form a uniform administration tended to clash with hybrid landscapes and waterscapes. This work explores how daily administrative and military practice shaped colonial polities and subject formation.Located at the intersection of colonial, legal, and environmental history, the study is of particular interest for scholars and students in history, political ecology, and anthropology.

    • Reframes the regional history of South Asia away from the subcontinental Indian mainland
    • Located at the intersection of colonial, environmental, and legal history
    • Integrates climate history with socio-political history
    • Brings present-day north-east India into a wider historical and regional analysis
    • Addresses the gap in research on formative years of the British rule
    • Studies lesser-known areas like Cachar, Manipur, Tripura, and Jaintia
  • 329.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Goodall, H. and A. Cadzow. Rivers and Resilience: Aboriginal People on Sydney’s Georges River. Sydney: University of New South Wales Press. 2009. xii+327 pp.2010In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 153-155Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Shiv Nadar University, India.
    Huseby och det brittiska imperiet2018In: Från Brittiska Indien till Huseby bruk: järnvägen som arena för modernitet och kolonialism under lycksökaren och järnvägsentreprenören Joseph Stephens tid i Indien 1860-69 / [ed] Margareta Petersson, Lund: Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2018, p. 9-13Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det småländska godset Huseby bruk köptes år 1867 av den unge Joseph Stephens som gjort sig en förmögenhet på att bygga järnväg i Brittiska Indien. När ­Stephens avvecklade sin indiska affärsverksamhet samlade han noggrant ihop sina brev, arbetskontrakt och lönelistor och skickade hem dem till Huseby, där de länge låg bortglömda i en kista på vinden. År 2008 upptäcktes kistan och den unika dokumentsamlingen kom att dra till sig historiker från flera länder. I den här boken lägger de fram sina resultat.

    Fram träder bilden av en historisk person och hans familj mitt i den koloniala expansion, globalisering och modernisering som svepte över världen under 1800-talet. Genom att utgå från Joseph Stephens och hans värld av envisa arbetare, fräcka konkurrenter och arroganta tjänstemän, långt från den koloniala maktens finrum, kan författarna ge nya perspektiv på det brittiska imperiet och dess verkningar i Indien och internationellt.

  • 331.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Introduction to The Autobiography of a Revolutionary in British India2013In: The Autobiography of a Revolutionary in British India / [ed] Kali Ghosh, New Delhi: Social Science Press, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University.
    Jayeeta Sharma. Empire's Garden : Assam and the Making of India: (Radical Perspectives.) Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. 2011. Pp. xiii, 324. Cloth $94.95, paper $25.952013In: American Historical Review, ISSN 0002-8762, E-ISSN 1937-5239, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 502-503Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 333.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Kampen om naturen: om miljöhistoria och politisk ekologi2004In: En helt annan historia: tolv historiografiska uppsatser / [ed] Samuel Edquist, Jörgen Gustafson, Stefan Johansson & Åsa Linderborg, Uppsala: Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet , 2004, p. 119-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 334.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Landscape, Culture, and Belonging. Writing the History of Northeast India: Ed. by Neeladri Bhattacharya and Joy L.K. Pachuau. Cambridge UniversityPress, Cambridge 2019. viii, 343 pp. Ill. Maps. £75.00. (E-book: $80.00.)2020In: International Review of Social History, ISSN 0020-8590, E-ISSN 1469-512X, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 351-354Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 335.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Landscapes and the Law: Environmental Politics, Regional Histories, and Contests Over Nature2008Book (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Landscapes and the Law: Environmental Politics, Regional Histories, and Contests over Nature2019Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landscapes and the Law is situated at the crossroads of environmental, colonial, and legal history. It examines the role of law in consolidating early colonial rule from the perspective of people’s access to nature in forests and hill tracts. This major interdisciplinary study is thus concerned with the social history of legal processes and the making of law, being as relevant today as it was when first published a decade ago.

    The book is focused equally on the multitude of colliding claims for access to land and resources, and the complex ways in which customary rights are redefined and codified for the purpose of securing and legitimizing colonial sovereign rule.

    Basing her archival and field work on the Nilgiri Hills in South India, Gunnel Cederlöf explores conflicting perceptions of nature and political visions that are projected onto landscapes and people. She traces debates on property and land rights, and how the empirical sciences merge with the legal claims justifying land acquisition. Popular resistance strategies to such exploitation are analysed, and a cross-cultural comparison made between early legal processes and social history in India, New Zealand, and North America.

  • 337.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala University ; Royal Institute of Technology KTH.
    Monsoon Landscapes: Spatial politics and mercantile colonial practice in India2014In: RCC Perspectives, ISSN 2190-5088, E-ISSN 2190-8087, Vol. 3, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British were unable to establish control over northeast Bengal due to the region’s climate and ecology, especially its fluid riverine systems. The ephemeral nature of land itself in Northeast Bengal made the region an “ungovernable” space for the British rulers. This “fluid nature” was incompatible with the ruling methods and the land-revenue settlement the East India Company tried to establish.

  • 338.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala University ; Royal Institute of Technology KTH.
    Människan och naturen2015In: Perspektiv på historia: en introduktion till historiestudier / [ed] Henrik Ågren, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 13-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university.
    Narratives of Rights: Codifying People and Land in Early Nineteenth-Century Nilgiris2010In: India’s Environmental History Volume 2: Colonialism, Modernity and Nationalism / [ed] Mahesh Rangarajan & K. Sivaramakrishnan, New Delhi: Permanent Black , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 340.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Narratives of Rights: Codyfying People and Land in Early Nineteenth-Century Nilgiris2002In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 319-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala university, Sweden;KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    “Natural Boundaries”: Negotiating Land Rights and Establishing Rule in Northern East-Bengal 1790s–1820s2014In: Savage Attack: Tribal Insurgency in India / [ed] Crispin Bates, Alpa Shah, New Delhi: Social Science Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Savage Attack: Tribal Insurgency in India the authors ask whether there is anything particularly adivasi about the forms of resistance that have been labelled as adivasi movements. What does it mean to speak about adivasi as opposed to peasant resistance? Can one differentiate adivasi resistance from that of other lower castes such as the dalits? In this volume the authors move beyond stereotypes of tribal rebellion to argue that it is important to explore how and why particular forms of resistance are depicted as adivasi issues at particular points in time. Interpretations that have depicted adivasis as a united and highly politicised group of people have romanticised and demonized tribal society and history, thus denying the individuals and communities involved any real agency. Both the interpretations of the state and of left-wing supporters of tribal insurgencies have continued to ignore the complex realities of tribal life and the variety in the expressions of political activism that have resulted across the length and breadth of the Indian subcontinent.

  • 342.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    "Natural Boundaries": Negotiating Land Rights and Establishing Rule on the East India Company's North-Eastern Frontier 1790s-1820s2017In: Savage Attack: Tribal Insurgency in India / [ed] Crispin Bates, Alpa Shah, Abingdon-on-Thames & New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 64-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than two centuries, the large and interconnected region spanning northeast Bengal, Burma and what is today known as Northeast India has been intersected by a multitude of formal and informal boundaries. The validity, strength and importance of these boundaries have varied greatly over time and space, as has their quality. During the last century, political tension made identity politics a key marker, and many boundaries claimed to enclose people of particular ethnic or community belongings. From the mid-to late nineteenth century, the British colonial government frequently argued for the need to keep particular ethnologically defined ‘tribes’ apart for reasons of control and security. The heavy handed colonial policies often resulted in violent clashes, and their insensitive encroachments into people’s lives and livelihoods also resonated in the administration of independent India.

  • 343.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Om flöden och gränser: att resa motströms från Bengalen till Yunnan under tidigt 1800-tal2018In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademiens årsbok, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2018, p. 89-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 344.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University.
    Pastoral Politics: Shepherds, Bureaucrats, and Conservation in the Western Himalaya by Vasant K. Saberwal2000In: Journal of Asian Studies, ISSN 0021-9118, E-ISSN 1752-0401, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 782-785Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 345.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university.
    Perceptions of Conservation Regimes: Review of Environmental History: As if Nature Existed by John R. McNeill, José Augusto Pádua2010In: The Book Review, ISSN 2001-1086, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 6-8Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 346.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Political Visions and Social Realities in Contemporary South India: Introduction2003In: Political Visions and Social Realities in Contemporary South India / [ed] Lars Berge and Gunnel Cederlöf, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 347.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Poor man's crop: evading opium monopoly2019In: Modern Asian Studies, ISSN 0026-749X, E-ISSN 1469-8099, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 633-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on opium in colonial India has so far mainly focused on the competing Malwa and Bengal opium currents under the control of the Sindia and Holkar families and of the British East India Company, respectively. The historical trajectory has tended to emphasize the implementation of a draconian and all-encompassing British monopoly. This study joins the emerging efforts to search the regional histories on the margins of the strongest players’ actions on the global scene. It aims at nuancing the narratives by focusing on a region away from such centres. The study investigates the local cultivation and usage of opium in Rangpore district—a region in north Bengal that had recently been badly affected by a severe flood. Here, the drug was extensively used and the lucrative trade with neighbouring states gave small-scale cultivators an income also under hard environmental conditions. The fact that production and trade were small-scale, fragmented, and made use of markets in Cooch Bihar, Assam, and Bhutan impeded British attempts at getting in control of production and trade.

  • 348.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rule against Nature: Founding an Empire on India’s North-Eastern Frontier2013Book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 349.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Seeking China’s Back Door: On English handkerchiefs and Global Local Markets in the Early Nineteenth Century2017In: Trans-Himalayan Boundaries: Livelihoods, Territorialities, Modernities / [ed] Dan Smyer Yü, Jean Michaud, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2017, p. 125-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 350.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Social Mobilisation among People Competing at the Bottom-Level of Society: The Presence of Missions in Rural South India c. 1900–19502003In: Christians and Missionaries in India: cross-cultural communication since 1500 ; with special reference to caste, conversion, and colonialism / [ed] Robert Eric Frykenberg ; associate editor Alaine Low, Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans Pub. , 2003, p. 336-356Chapter in book (Refereed)
45678910 301 - 350 of 1759
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf