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  • 51.
    Brodin, Eva
    Pedagogiska institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Critical Thinking in Scholarship:: Meanings, Conditions and Development2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the phenomenon of critical thinking in scholarship as regards its meanings, conditions, and development using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. This exploration takes its departure in ancient Greece, following a historical movement of the phenomenon up to present day perspectives on critical thinking, revealing a range of different meanings and conditions. Thus, the reader is invited to follow my synthetic meaning constitution of the phenomenon of critical thinking as it appears in different philosophical and educational texts. Through this gradual process of meaning constitution it is shown that the scholarly critical thinker is in one way or another concerned with abstract relationships, in order to either master, understand, or change the world. These underlying interests may, in turn, be derived from the critical thinker’s sense of responsibility towards God, nature, society, and humanity as a whole. It also appears that even though critical thinking in scholarship is traditionally framed within rational and principle based thinking, the development of the meaning of critical thinking is on its way to new dimensions. Besides rationality, other qualities of critical thinking are highlighted, such as reflective thinking, emotions, creativity, imagination, and intuition. Despite the fact that research on critical thinking has started to move in new directions, educational policy documents implicitly conceptualize critical thinking in traditional terms. This means that the phenomenon is captured within its own instrumentality, with no further concern for its possible ends. The same circumstance can be noted in relation to contemporary perspectives on critical thinking, which tend to focus on the process of critical thinking, since critical thinking is implicitly understood as an assurance of attaining normatively good ends. However, critical thinking is a phenomenon that is future oriented, involving its intention and possible ends. Against this background, it is therefore argued that critical thinking receives its most critical feature when intention, process and end constitute a constructive interrelated whole.

  • 52. Brodin, Eva Maria
    Critical Thinking in Scholarship: Meanings, Conditions and Development. Revised Edition.2008Book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Cavallin, Jens
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    The Reign of Mind2009Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview and inquiry into the problems of power over media, on a philosophical background.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 54.
    Dahlberg, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The question of meaning — a momentous issue for qualitative research2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 1598723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we identify some worrying problems in the contemporary practice of qualitative research, such as the confusion regarding content and meaning in content analysis, the frequent use of standardized methods that avoids philosophy, as well as the description/interpretation dichotomy in empirical research. Since they all arise from a failure to understand the concept of meaning, we return to the question of meaning as the axis that qualitative research pivots around. We examine the meaning of meaning, and how meaning differs from content, and we then ask what consequences this has for research. Even though our analysis is rooted in phenomenological philosophy, we argue that that the ideas that we present are valid for any qualitative research approach. The question of understanding and relating to meaning, we argue, is a momentous issue for qualitative research, where we either continue safeguarding the very essence of qualitative research as dealing with human phenomena, or give it up in favor of more pragmatic and clear-cut methods that seemingly does away with the question of meaning.

  • 55.
    Elleström, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Edlund, Bengt
    Rockmusikens nya kläder1984In: Filosofisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7482, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Ellingsen, Sidsel
    et al.
    Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Norway;University of Bergen, Norway.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Norway.
    Kristoffersen, Kjell
    Agder University, Norway.
    Rosland, Jan-Henrik
    Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Norway;University of Bergen, Norway.
    Alvsvåg, Herdis
    Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Norway.
    The Pendulum Time of Life: The experience of time, when living with severe incurable disease a phenomenological and philosophical study2015In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the experience of time when living with severe incurable disease. A phenomenological and philosophical approach of description and deciphering were used. In our modern health care system there is an on-going focus on utilizing and recording the use of time, but less focus on the patient’s experience of time, which highlights the need to explore the patients’ experiences, particularly when life is vulnerable and time is limited. The empirical data consisted of 26 open-ended interviews with 23 participants receiving palliative care at home, in hospital or in a nursing home in Norway. The theoretical frameworks used are mainly based upon K. Martinsens philosophy of care, K. E. Løgstrup phenomenological philosophy, in addition to C. Saunders’ hospice philosophy, L. Feigenberg’s thanatology and U. Qvarnström’s research exploring patient’s reactions to impending death. Experience of time is described as being a movement that moves the individual towards death in the field of opposites,and deciphered to be a universal, but a typical and unique experience emerging through three integrated levels: Sense of time; where time is described as a movement that is proceeding at varying speeds. Relate to time; where the awareness of limited life changes the understanding of time to be more existential. Being in time; where limited time seems to clarify the basic living conditions and phenomena of life. The existence of life when the prospect of death is present is characterized by emotional swings that move within polarizing dimensions which is reflected in the experience of time illustrated as the moves of the pendulum in a grandfather clock. The diversity of the experience of time is oscillating between going fast or slow, being busy or calm, being unpredictable but predictable, safe or unsafe and between being good or bad, depending on the embodied situation of the individual.

  • 57.
    Gillberg, Claudia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    A Methodological Interpretation of Feminist Pragmatism2011In: Contemporary Feminist Pragmatism / [ed] Maurice Hamington and Celia Bardwell-JOnes, Indiana University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to render a methodological interpretation of feminist pragmatism, to offer some points for reflection on the concepts of community, reciprocity, and the need for social study/reform. Empirically inspired explications on non-participation are offered. The democratic meaning of participation in collaborative knowledge building is reflected upon. Feminist pragmatism and its methodological interpretation in terms of action research are presented as an important contribution to thinking about organisational and professional development, the gendered nature of knowledge and the way we organise work and society. Examples of transformative actions on the basis of collaborative knowledge building processes are presented and, finally, knowledge simplification and the bureaucratisation of knowledge are highlighted as undemocratic.

  • 58.
    Hagevi, Magnus
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Statsvetenskap.
    Sekulariseringens slut?2005In: Sociologisk Forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, no 4, p. 35-42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Hagevi, Magnus
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Brommesson, Douglas
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Uddhammar, Emil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Internationell nivå ett måste.2009In: SmålandspostenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 60.
    Hallgren, Hanna
    Södertörns högskola.
    Samtidigt: Hanna Hallgren om Focault och filosofins politik2008In: Aftonbladet Kultur, no 29 Nov, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Henriksson, Carina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Saevi, Tone
    Skogen, Rochelle
    Hermeneutic Phenomenology Research:The possibilities of collaborative writing in phenomenological research.2008In: Symposium at the CSSE Annual Conference, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, May 31 - June 3, 2008., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Holmberg, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad university.
    Zimmerman Nilsson, Marie-Helene
    Halmstad university.
    Ericsson, Claes
    Halmstad university.
    Lindgren, Monica
    University of Gothenburg.
    Snacking on Knowledge and Feel Good: Challenging discourses on arts in education2016In: European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education, E-ISSN 2002-4665, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 38-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to re-think the results of four larger studies conducted by the authors during the last decade, all with a discourse analytical approach. The studies are empirical and concern the Swedish field of arts in education and deal with a comprehensive material consisting of interviews, observations and field notes. In the results of these studies three prominent discourses emerges. A Curriculum discourse, where content knowledge is connected to traditions, norms and values of educational institutions, a Feel-good discourse that deals with content knowledge where social and personal aspects are essential, and a Snacking on knowledge discourse where content knowledge is portrayed as something students are able to pick and choose according to their own preference. Ideas of late modern society and arts in education are then used as a basis to carry out a critical discussion about the emerging discourses. Also different teacher and student positions are problematized.

  • 63.
    Härlin, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, The University Administration.
    Den mänskliga naturen?2014In: Sans, ISSN 2000-9690, no 2, p. 82-85Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Härlin, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Per, Sundberg
    California Academy of Sciences, USA.
    Taxonomy and philosophy of names1998In: Biology & Philosophy, ISSN 0169-3867, E-ISSN 1572-8404, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although naming biological clades is a major activity in taxonomy, little attention has been paid to what these names actually refer to. In philosophy, definite descriptions have long been considered equivalent to the meaning of names and biological taxonomy is a scientific application of these ideas. One problem with definite descriptions as the meanings of names is that the name will refer to whatever fits the description rather than the intended individual (clade). Recent proposals for explicit phylogenetic definitions of clade names suffer from similar problems and we argue that clade names cannot be defined since they lack intension. Furthermore we stress the importance of "tree-thinking" for phylogenetic reference to work properly.

  • 65.
    Håkansson, Krister
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education. Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Idrottsavdelningen.
    Hageskog, Carl-Axel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education. Idrottsavdelningen.
    Framgångsrik Coaching: Kan "vetenskaplighet" vara ett användbart instrument?2006In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 46-51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö University.
    A Philosophy of S(p)orts: A review essay on A Philosophy of Sport by Steven Connor2012In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of

    CONNOR, S. (2011). A philosophy of sport. London, England, Reaktion Books.

  • 67.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö University.
    Ett alternativ till kritik: Om parkour, Michel Serres och "konsten att spåra"2011In: Kulturstudier, kropp och idrott: Perspektiv på fenomen i gränslandet mellan natur och kultur / [ed] David Cardell, Helena Tolvhed, Malmö: Bokbox Förlag , 2011, p. 147-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book chapter is an essay in which the similarities between the physical culture of parkour and the methodology of French philosopher Michel Serres are explored. What is sketched out in the essay is a stance for cultural studies scholars: a way of doing research which is leant the name "the art of tracing". This stance is characterized by intimacy with that which is investigated, rather than by the distance which the essay ascribes to the critical analytical stance.

  • 68.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö University.
    K and The 'Lob'2011In: EASS, Umeå, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recurring theme in critical sport studies is the issue of whether the element of competition -- measuring, comparing and ranking performances (Loland 2002) – in sports is fascistoid (Tännsjö 2000, 2001), and, whether sports constrains the potential of human movement, and its creativity, rather then enhancing it (Eichberg 2010). In this essay, I will argue that the element of competition is vital for the creativity of movement-potential in sports. Still, the alleged ‘fascistoid’ or ‘creativity constraining’ element could be ‘hi-jacked’. As an example of this kind of hi-jacking, an autoethnographical (Chang 2008) account of my participation in recreational table-tennis will be seen through a process-philosophical lens. Deleuze’s conceptual pair ‘minor’ and ‘major’ (Bene & Deleuze, 1979; Deleuze & Guattari, 1986) will in the essay be extended to sport. The argument is that prolonging elements in athletic contests could be understood as ‘minor sport’, which in the essay is exemplified by defensive strokes, like chops and lobs, in table-tennis. ‘Major sport’, then, is understood as equivalent with ’the structural goal of sport’, namely, to produce winners by comparing, ranking and measuring bodily performances (Loland 2002). As a table-tennis player in the corporative/recreational series, my way of playing has rendered different conceptions among the other players, ranging from joyful to provoked. This manner could be described with ‘minor’ actions like ‘suspending the game’, ´delaying the outcome’, and ‘never having learned to smash’. When contestants are equivalent in competence and desire to win, competitions tend to produce ‘sweet tension of uncertainty of outcome’ (Loland 2002). My way of playing is directed towards maximizing the ‘sweet tension of uncertainty’. Hereby focus is shifted from sport as context where winners are produced, towards sport as a context where ‘sweet tension’ is produced. This stance combines the benefits of both protagonists and antagonists of competition.

  • 69.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Om “konsten att spåra”: ett alternativ till kritik utifrån exemplen Michel Serres och Parkour2016In: Gränslös Kunskap - Centrum för Öresundsstudier, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kritik och analys är adelsmärken i akademins systematiska frambringande av kunskap och allra helst amalgamerade i form av det ”kritiskt analytiska förhållningssättet”. Etymologiskt denoterar dessa ord gränsdragande, finfördelning och fragmentisering. Men om kunskap, i linje med vad föreliggande workshop föreslår, ska kunna vara gränslös, är vi då inte bakbundna från början när våra främsta instrument för kunskapsproduktion redan är kalibrerade för uppdelning i fack och kategorier? Denna presentation funderar över ett alternativ till denna akademins minsta gemensamma nämnare.

    Vetenskapssociologen och modernitetsantropologen Bruno Latour (1993, 1998, 2005, 2010 & 2013) uppmanar oss gång på gång att finna alternativ till kritik. Han menar, tvärtemot vad akademins disciplinära beskaffenhet indicerar, att världen och verkligheten inte främst förstås som uppdelad i natur och kultur. Hybrider mellan dessa förmenta poler uppstår bortom vår blick när vi tar detta moderna påstående för givet. Just för att vi tänker oss existensen som en dikotomi på detta vis möjliggörs fler oheliga allianser, eller naturkulturer (Latour, 1993; Haraway, 2008), att uppstå; genmanipulation, kloning, global uppvärmning och nukleära tillbud är bara några exempel.

    För att finna en repertoar som inte har denna utgångspunkt, vänder sig Latour till den filosofen Michel Serres, vars omsorgsfulla kartografi över i stort allt är baserad på en princip att utmana all påstådd inkommensurabilitet. Varsamhet, nyfikenhet och upptäckarlust präglar Serres strövtåg genom konstformer, vetenskap, teknologi, och idrott i det som han kallar en encyklopedisk strävan att framlägga en syntes (Serres & Latour, 1995). Just dessa anspråk – encyklopedi och syntes – gör honom till en sällsam figur i det posthumanistiska fält han skrivits in i, då denna tradition snarare vänder sig mot det omnipotenta och imperialistiska etablerandet av slika företeelser. Spänningen mellan det encyklopediska och kärleken till det lokala är en fruktbar paradox som präglar Serres och hans forskarpersona ”kunskapens trubadur”. Hemligheten är att inte upprätta fasta förbindelser mellan företeelser, utan efemära kopplingar, eller ”spårningar, inte spår” som Latour uttrycker det.  

    Traceurer (Franska för spårare) kallar de som utövar förflyttningskonsten Parkour sig själva. Deras sätt att upprätta nya kopplingar mellan punkter och byggnader i stadsrummet är som en direkt översättning av Serres filosofiska kartografi. Inspirerad av filosofen Gilles Deleuze, som också verkade i Latour och Serres grannskap, skulle man kunna beskriva parkour som ett slags ”mindre arkitektur” (Jonasson, 2013), vilket för posthumanismens vidkommande medför att människan intar rollen som icke-människan som skapar (nya) förbindelser i givet kollektiv. Genom att ”spåra” mellan Michel Serres och parkourlitteratur avser denna presentation att utveckla ett ”ickekritiskt” – sammanfogande istället för sönderdelande – förhållningssätt att inta inom forskning. Själva demonstrationen – spårandet mellan Serres och Parkour – och de spårande demonstrationerna i dessas praxis skapar förutsättningar för att kunna diskutera ”konsten att spåra” som ett alternativ/komplement till det kritiskt analytiska förhållningssättet. Serres, med den grekiska guden Hermes som inspiration, söker efter en kunskapsinhämtning vars fundament har vingar på sina fötter. Det blir svårt att finna något som svarar bättre mot denna beskrivning än en traceur. 

  • 70.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    PE and posthumanism2016In: Abstract book NERA 2016: 9-11 March, Helsinki Finland. NERA 44th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association: Social Justice, Equality and Solidarity in Education, 2016, p. 299-299Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the focus on body and movement in physical education (PE), it is noteworthy that this particular subject has been so little discussed in relation to posthumanism. From a posthumanist perspective, body and movement could potentially be features of human existence that are able to evade the pitfalls of humanism, such as free will, intentions, logos, representation, etc. Even if meaning and symbols surely can be projected onto body and movement, they nevertheless possess dimensions not exhaustible by such cultivation.

    The present text aims to outline a field of investigation performing precisely the encounter between PE and posthumanism. While a few studies within PE research (cf. Larsson & Quennerstedt, 2012) have identified posthumanism as an asset, much more need to be done. Within the nascent research field of early childhood education (ECE), posthumanism has grown exponentially more influential (cf. Palmer, 2011; Lenz Taguchi, 201X; Hultman, 2014; Änggård, 2015). Aspects of materiality, body, movement, knowledge, and play are in those studies seen from the viewpoint of the feminist philosopher Karen Barad (2007).

  • 71.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Talets vär(l)dkropp: Om kroppen i rörelse som posthumanistiskt undersökningsinstrument2016In: Gränsløs. Tidskrift för studier av Öresundsregionens historia, kultur och samhällsliv, ISSN 2001-4961, no 7, p. 66-83Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att låta världen och inte bara människan komma till tals är ett centralt anspråk inom den så kallade posthumanismen. Föreliggande tanke- och rörelseexperiment försöker göra detta genom att spela in utsagor yttrade av en löpande kropp som rör sig på ojämn mark. Tendenser inom tillämpning av posthumanistiska perspektiv som eventuellt hindrar världen från att komma till tals identifieras och diskuteras kritiskt: fascinationen över vatten som element; användandet av Latour-litanior, d.v.s. uppräkningen av listor med heterogena beståndsdelar; bannlysningen av subjektet och det mänskliga. De analytiska begreppen är hämtade från Michel Serres så kallat ekonarrativa metod, viken syftar till att låta naturen komma till tals för att berätta sin historia. Slutsatsen är att subjektet inte bör utplånas från posthumanistiska utsagor om världen men att det alltid kommer efter det som i studien betecknas som projektet och interjektet. De senare är först på plats i kontakten med omgivningen för att höra på och bidra till dess berättelse.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Talets vär(l)dkropp
  • 72.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The Froth of the Land: Running on Breakwaters2016In: Gränslöst Vatten - Centrum för Öresundsstudier, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Ian Buchanan’s (2014) short essay “The ephemeral coast” appears to fixate the coastline as a sort of vantage point, from which multiple worlds, realms, and logics become discernible. Interestingly, Buchanan almost immediately slips on the rocks, so to speak, and falls into the water where his initial thought is swallowed by eddies, currents, and bifurcating fluxes of water. This research-project is a serious attempt to work in the same continental tradition as Buchanan, and more precisely the posthumanist branch of it, but without going so far as to practice what Ian Bogost (2010) provokingly has labelled “Fire Hose Metaphysics”, which he thinks is a common but somewhat erroneous move of process philosophers. Water in movement is spellbinding, as is evident from Buchanan’s essay. What if were to follow the “amphibious anthropology” of Peter Sloterdijk (ten Bos, 2009)? This also amounts to upheaving the land-water binary as pointed out by Lahiri-Dutt (2014)

    Epistemologically, what is at stake is the odd task of trying to give the curious posthuman, or perhaps more-than-human, being a voice. One cannot fully get rid of the paradox that posthumanist theories and methods are formulated by the same entities that called themselves human beings not long time ago. In order to do this, I will address another conceptual couplet in posthumanist thinking: the material-semiotic relation. By treading the border of land and sea, my presupposition is that I have found a good conceptual locus for pondering the divide between nature and culture, which according to Bruno Latour (1993, 2013) is an essential labour of thought today; a sustainable ontology of sorts. Rather than an explication of the relation between the material and the semiotic in this setting, what I endeavour to achieve is to urge the material surroundings to use me as a ventriloquist dummy, that is: to press a semiotic content

    I will stand on firm land, or rather: run on not so firm land. The space of Breakwaters has begun to fascinate me in a number of ways, which I aim to explore in the present study. Breakwaters form a jagged, and fractal defence against the sea: a froth of the land in its desperate attempt to avoid erosion. This could theoretically implicate that when the posthuman being is given a voice, culture and society, land and rock, could also be given a voice (that is not fully human). Equipped with an array of technological devices (cell phone, headset, GoPro, Runkeeper), I will run on the Breakwaters of the Öresund Strait and talk at the same time. The data will consist of audio and video recordings, which could be regarded as a sort of “memory writing” (Ceder, 2016) in medias res. The uneven surface and pace will ensure that I will not know fully what I will talk about prior to the event; all to trick my intentionality and in a somewhat post-Socratic manner deliver the posthuman me from the human me, and thus become the frothing voice of the land. This more-than-human testimonial will be treated as a semiotic statement evoked by the blurred materiality of breakwaters.

  • 73.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö University.
    "Undermining" and "overmining": Is there a third way in the unification of sport science?2013In: ECSS, Barcelona, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download (pdf)
    Poster ECSS
  • 74.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Norms, knowledge claims and authorities as justifications in students' reasoning about using new technology in societal practice2011In: Science & Culture: Promise, Challenge and Demand, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how students draw on norms, knowledge claims and authorities when reasoning about socioscientific issues. The aim of the study is to provide an image of students' sense of agency and how they handle trust and security issues by referring to the above mentioned modalities of the societal structures ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ (Giddens 1984). Examples from gene technology were used as the subject for interviews with 13 Swedish high-school students (year 11, age 17-18). At the time for interviews, the students had participated in and completed an introductory course in genetics which included a group discussion about genetic diseases and ethics. A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used for analysis of interviews. Students were found to use both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify acceptance or rejection of new technology. By doing that, they showed how norms as well as knowledge claims can be used to justify opposing position as they were trying to build trust in either science and technology or in experts. It was found that students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on their having or lacking appropriate knowledge. Students were also found to have difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms). Attention is drawn to the problem of students' using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation). Furthermore, students' sense of agency appears to be dependent on sharing norms with experts.

  • 75.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Metodprinciper för generell struktur och filosofisk belysning på livsvärldsteoretisk grund2019In: Fenomenologi i praktiken: fenomenologisk forskning i ett skandinaviskt perspektiv / [ed] Helena Dahlberg, Sidsel Ellingsen, Bente Martinsen & Susanne Rosberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 269-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Matta, Corrado
    Stockholm university.
    Actor Network, Ontic Structural Realism and the Ontological Status of Actants2014In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Networked Learning 2014 / [ed] Bayne S, Jones C, de Laat M, Ryberg T & Sinclair C., 2014, p. 195-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I discuss the ontological status of actants. Actants are argued as being the basic constituting entities of networks in the framework of Actor Network Theory (Latour, 2007). I introduce two problems concerning actants that have been pointed out by Collin (2010). The first problem concerns the explanatory role of actants. According to Collin, actants cannot play the role of explanans of networks and products of the same newtork at the same time, at pain of circularity. The second problem is that if actants are, as suggested by Latour, fundamentally propertyless, then it is unclear how they combine into networks. This makes the nature of actants inexplicable. I suggest that both problems rest on the assumption of a form of object ontology, i.e. the assumption that the ontological basis of reality consists in discrete individual entities that have intrinsic properties. I argue that the solution to this problem consists in the assumption of an ontology of relations, as suggested within the framework of Ontic Structural Realism (Ladyman & Ross, 2007). Ontic Structural Realism is a theory concerning the ontology of science that claims that scientific theories represent a reality consisting on only relation, and no individual entities. Furthermore I argue that the employment of OSR can, at the price of little modification for both theories, solve both of the two problems identified by Collin concerning ANT. Throughout the text I seek support for my claims by referring to examples of application of ANT to the context of networked learning. As I argue, the complexity of the phenomenon of networked learning gives us a convenient vantage point from which we can clearly understand many important aspects of both ANT and OSR. While my proposal can be considered as an attempt to solve Collin’s problems, it is also an experiment of reconciliation between analytic and constructivist philosophy of science. In fact I point out that on the one hand Actor Network Theory and Ontic Structural Realism show an interesting number of points of agreement, such as the naturalistic character and the focus on relationality. On the other hand, I argue that all the intuitive discrepancies that originates from the Science and Technology Studies’ criticism against analytic philosophy of science are at a closer look only apparent.

  • 77.
    Matta, Corrado
    Stockholm university.
    Interpretivism and Causal Explanations: A Case from Educational Research2015In: Philosophy of the social sciences, ISSN 0048-3931, E-ISSN 1552-7441, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 543-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article criticizes a view about the interpretation of human action, labeled in the text as interpretivism. This view posits a sharp separation between the natural and social sciences, to the effect that the methods of the latter cannot be applied to the former. I criticize this standpoint by reconstructing a case of educational research. As I argue, the case I analyze indicates that the arguments in support of interpretivism are contradicted by what social researchers can actually achieve. I conclude that the interpretivistic claims lack support and that the general separation claim appears as problematic.

  • 78.
    Matta, Corrado
    Stockholm university.
    Methodological Naturalism and Teaching Research Methods2017In: NERA 2017 Abstracts: 23-25 March 2017: Learning and education – material conditions and consequences, 2017, p. 259-, article id 133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research topic/Aim: In this paper I discuss the consequence of a specific standpoint in the philosophy of social science, which I call methodological naturalism (MN), for teaching social research methods (and qualitative methods in particular)

    Theoretical frameworks:  The theoretical framework of MN can be summarized by its main claim, according to which, despite exhibiting diversity in concrete methods, social sciences share (both internally, and externally with the natural sciences) at least a basic set of methodological core principles. One of these is that all use data to support claims in order to empirically ground their conclusions.

    Methodology/research design: I start by summarizing the main current philosophical orientation in teaching qualitative research methods. This is retrieved from the analysis of 90 qualitative methods textbooks. The analysis of the textbooks provided a general picture of the philosophical orientation in qualitative research methods teaching as informed by a standpoint I call “paradigmatic approach”. According to this approach philosophical commitments that are shared within research community determine the researchers’ choice of methods. I therefore compare the standpoints of methodological naturalism with the paradigmatic approach and look for the claims in which the two standpoints diverge.

    Expected conclusions/Findings: From the comparison of methodological naturalism with the paradigmatic approach I derive three prescriptions about teaching qualitative research methods (and social research methods in general).

    (1)   MN discourages accounts of research methods that rest on the strong interpretation of methodological rules as inherently social.

    (2)   MN recommends a double movement, going from cognitive to social issues and from social to cognitive issues of methods, as a general structure for teaching research methods.

    (3)   MN recommends decomposing and problematizing stereotypes concerning the relationship between philosophy and methods, and favors differential reconstructions.

    Relevance for Nordic Educational Research: I conclude by arguing that these prescriptions can make a contribution to the practice of teaching social research methods, mainly by bringing to the surface a number of issues that have been overlooked in the literature, and by providing suggestion on how to combine different aspects of social research methods that have traditionally been kept apart.

  • 79.
    Matta, Corrado
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Policy Evaluation and Mixed Methods2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I assess the claim that mixed methods are especially appropriate methods for evaluating policy. The aim of my discussion is to clarify in what way mixing different methods can be instrumentally beneficial when evaluating policy initiatives. 

    Social researchers concerned with the issue of evaluation have claimed on many occasions that mixed methods are especially appropriate for the aim of building program theories (Chen 2006; White 2008, 2009). A program theory is a model of a policy intervention that represents the intervention, its context and its outcome as a causal chain. The primacy of mixed methods as a specifically appropriate methodological approach for program theory has been justified in a contrastive way. As it is claimed, evaluation based on statistical studies can only account for the effect of an intervention on a particular phenomenon (White 2008). In contrast, program theory requires understanding how the intervention generated the measured effect (Chen 2006). For this reason, it has been claimed that effect size studies must be complemented with studies that provide an account of the causal path or mechanism that leads from the intervention to the outcome in its original context. It is interesting to note that several philosophers have shared this concern about certain statistical methods (Cartwright 2007; Grüne-Yanoff 2016; Runhardt 2015). 

    However, the literature concerning mixed methods shows that the very term “mixed methods” is vague, covering a plethora of different techniques for the collection and analysis of empirical data. Therefore, it is implausible to think that the simple use of any mixed method is a sufficient condition for avoiding the limitation of statistical methods and for providing a good program theory. This poses a problem for the assessment of the claim of the superiority of mixed methods for program evaluation. 

    In order for circumventing this problem, I categorize the mixed methods in groups, according to their characteristic integration strategy. The literature on mixed methods typically distinguishes three such strategies: i) method integration ii) data integration iii) model integration. 

    The next step in my argument consists in the definition of a criterion for the explanatory aims of program theory. As it is claimed in the literature about program theory, an appropriate model of a program ought to describe some mechanism connecting the intervention to its outcome. Following Cartwright and Stegenga (2012), I define a mechanism as an answer to a how-question that accounts for the INUS condition (Insufficient but Necessary parts of Unnecessary but Sufficient conditions) that influence the outcome of the intervention. Therefore, the capability of the integration strategies to account for mechanisms can be assessed by comparing their capability of accounting for INUS conditions. Using examples from the evaluation of a large-scale professional development program for mathematics teachers recently introduced in Sweden, I proceed with the comparison of integration strategies. 

    References 

    Cartwright, Nancy. 2007. “Are RCTs the Gold Standard?” BioSocieties 2 (1): 11–20. 

    Cartwright, Nancy, and Jacob Stegenga. 2012. A Theory of Evidence for Evidence-Based Policy. Oxford University Press/The British Academy. 

    Chen, Huey T. 2006. “A Theory-Driven Evaluation Perspective on Mixed Methods Research.” In Research in the Schools, 75–83. 

    Grüne-Yanoff, Till. 2016. “Why Behavioral Policy needs Mechanistic Evidence.” Economics & Philosophy 32 (3): 463–83. 

    Runhardt, Rosa W. 2015. “Evidence for Causal Mechanisms in Social Science: Recommendations from Woodward’s Manipulability Theory of Causation.” Philosophy of Science 82 (5): 1296–1307. 

    White, Howard. 2008. “Of Probits and Participation: The Use of Mixed Methods in Quantitative Impact Evaluation.” IDS Bulletin 39 (1): 98–109. 

    ———. 2009. “Theory-Based Impact Evaluation: Principles and Practice.” Journal of Development Effectiveness 1 (3): 271–284.

  • 80.
    Matta, Corrado
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Qualitative Research Methods and Evidential Reasoning2019In: Philosophy of the social sciences, ISSN 0048-3931, E-ISSN 1552-7441, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 385-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the concept of evidential reasoning in the context of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. A conceptualization of qualitative evidential reasoning is proposed. This conceptualization is based on the analysis of an example of qualitative methods applied to the study of music education. I argue that this conceptualization identifies specific and nontrivial conditions for qualitative evidential reasoning and, at the same time, supports the claim that there is no essential methodological separation regarding evidence between quantitative and qualitative methods.

  • 81.
    Matta, Corrado
    Stockholm university.
    Scientific Representation and Science Learning2014In: Open Review of Educational Research, E-ISSN 2326-5507, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 211-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine three examples of philosophical theories of scientific representation with the aim of assessing which of these is a good candidate for a philosophical theory of scientific representation in science learning. The three candidate theories are Giere’s intentional approach, Suárez’s inferential approach and Lynch and Woolgar’s sociological approach. In order to assess which theory is more promising, I will compare the three candidate theories to two aspects of scientific representation in science learning that emerge from empirical research on science learning. I label these aspects as the intentional and normative character of scientific representation in science learning. As I argue, whereas the other competing accounts of scientific representation can only capture one of the two aspects highlighted in this article, the inferential conception has the capacity to capture them both in a coherent way. Thus, I conclude that the inferential conception seems to be a fruitful philosophical theory of scientific representation in science learning.

  • 82.
    Matta, Corrado
    Stockholm university.
    The Role of Philosophical Theory in Qualitative Methods Textbooks2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I discuss the role of philosophical theories (intended as coherent sets of philosophical claims) in social research methods textbooks, and in particular in qualitative methods textbooks. The theses that I defend in the paper are two: (1) Qualitative methods textbooks typically contain the claim that philosophical theories determine research methods. (2) The determination relationship between philosophical theories and research methods that is typically assumed in qualitative methods textbooks is potentially problematic. In the first part of the paper I qualify and provide empirical evidence for (1). The empirical evidence consists of the analysis of a random sample of 90 qualitative methods textbooks. In the second part of the paper I critically assess the determination claim contained in textbooks and argue that this claim is both philosophically and educationally problematic

  • 83.
    Nadr Ali, Mona
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Salwan, Diwan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Hedersrelaterat våld och förtryck: Multidimensionell utsatthet och kulturell stereotypifiering 2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to highlight discourses that appear in professionals’ descriptions of various aspects of honor-related violence and oppression. The study is based on seven qualitative semi-structured interviews with professionals who are in contact or have been in contact with the phenomenon within the social services. The theoretical and methodological approach has been based on a Foucauldian-inspired interpretation method and an intersectional perspective in order to gain a depth and a breadth in the analysis of the empirical data. We concluded among other things that honor-related violence and oppression can and should be understood without a perspective of we against them. The professionals explain the phenomenon as something that only exists within people with a different background than Swedish. Other cultures, religions and nationalities are opposed to Swedishness. Furthermore, the participants mention that the problem occurs everywhere around the world where no specific culture, religion or nationality is seen as the bearer of honor-related violence and oppression. By contrast, individuals from the Middle East who have Islam as faith are categorized more easily in honor related cases. This is based on prejudice and stereotypical notions of predetermined roles when it is the question of who the perpetrator and the oppressed is in the honor-related context. In addition, it may result in vulnerability in several dimensions. We propose research where vulnerable people can come to speak, get their voices, thoughts and feelings heard. Also, research that can make hidden groups visible for the social services in relation to honor-related violence and oppression, such as LGBTQ individuals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Hedersrelaterat våld och förtryck: Multidimensionell utsatthet och kulturell stereotypifiering
  • 84.
    Nilsson, Roddy
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Sociologi.
    Foucault – en introduktion2008Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Michel Foucault (1926–1984) var en av 1900-talets mest inflytelserika samhällsteoretiker. Hans tänkande kring galenskap, makt, diskurs, kriminalitet, sanning, disciplin, styrning och sexualitet och en rad andra områden är idag självklara referenspunkter inom högre undervisning och kulturdebatt. I detta arbete presenteras Foucaults tänkande i en översiktlig och sammanfattande form.

  • 85. Ohlström, Marcus
    Liberal Neutrality and the Domain of the Political2014In: Review Journal of Political Philosophy, ISSN 1752-2056, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 31-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper suggests and defends a principled way to strike a balance between the two conflicting demands for individual sovereignty and the possibility to address politically matters affecting the many. Revisiting the debate on liberal neutrality and drawing on the Rawlsian distinction between liberty and what gives worth to liberty, it is argued that policies affecting liberty must always be neutral in aim, while policies affecting the distribution of the resources giving worth to liberty need not. This way, we restrict the means available to pursue political goals rather than the range of permissible goals itself. We thereby allow for political influence over a wide array of matters, but leave the final right to decide to the individual herself. Having outlined some of the advantages of such a view, it is suggested that liberal theory henceforth should pay less attention to what the state may do, and more to how the state may do what it sets out to do.

  • 86.
    O'Sullivan, Simon
    et al.
    Goldsmiths Collage, UK.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Contours and Case Studies for a Dissenting Subjectivity: (or, how to live creatively in a fearful world)2006In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 147-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Papageorgiou, Vasilis
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Athens in Derrida2014In: Oxford literary review, ISSN 0305-1498, E-ISSN 1757-1634, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 283-285Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Posti, Piia K.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Fantasi och berättelser: Flykt, destruktivitet, andrum, kreativ kraft?2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Dikt och förbannad lögn! Läsa bör man, annars dör man! Tansnusk! Åsikterna är många och skiftande när det gäller litteratur och berättelser. Vad ska "hittepå" vara bra för? Vad är en god berättelse? När är berättelsen eller fantasin en positiv kraftkälla? När är den destruktiv? Välkomna till Byteatern för ett samtal om människals kreativa tänkande och behov av att skapa berättelser.

  • 89.
    Queiroz, Joao
    et al.
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Atã, Pedro
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Iconicity in Peircean situated cognitive Semiotics2014In: Charles Sanders Peirce in His Own Words: 100 Years of Semiotics, Communication and Cognition / [ed] Torkild Thellefsen, Bent Sorensen, Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 283-290Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Queiroz, João
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Atã, Pedro
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Externalismo, iconicidade e cognição distribuída em C.S.Peirce2018In: OuvirOUver, ISSN 1983-1005, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 44-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For C.S. Peirce, mind is semiosis (sign-action) in a dialogical form, and cognition is the development of available semiotic material artifacts in which it is embodied as a power to produce interpretants (sign-effects). It takes the form of development of semiotic artifacts, such as writing tools, instruments of observation, notational systems, languages, and so forth. Our objective in this paper is to explore the connection between a semiotic theory of mind and the conception of extended mind through the notion of iconicity, taking advantage of an empirical example of investigation in distributed problem solving (Tower of Hanoi).

  • 91.
    Queiroz, João
    et al.
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil;University of the Free State, South Africa.
    Atã, Pedro
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Intersemiotic Translation as an Abductive Cognitive Artifact2019In: Complexity Thinking in Translation Studies: Methodological Considerations / [ed] Kobus Marais, Reine Meylaerts, New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 19-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intersemiotic translation (IT) can be described as a cognitive artifact, designed to distribute artistic creativity. Cognitive artifacts are part of material and cultural niches of human cognition. They have different forms and can be used in many different activities. Their varied morphology includes “material and mental” structures (Norman 1993), “designed for and opportunistic” entities (Hutchins 1999), and “transparent and opaque” processes (Clark 2004). For several authors, cognition is full of cognitive artifacts; even more radically, cognition is a network of artifacts. For many artists, intersemiotic translation is one of these tools. But what is its ontological nature? And how does intersemiotic translation work? As an augmented intelligence technique, intersemiotic translation works as a generative model, providing new, unexpected, surprising data in the target system and affording competing results that allow the system to generate candidate instances. To describe this process, we introduce a model of intersemiotic translation based on Peirce’s mature semeiotic. At the end of the chapter, we speculate about the role that abductive inference can have in the process of generating new ideas in an artistic domain. What we have done here must be considered a preliminary tentative model of intersemiotic translation as a cognitive artifact to externalize creativity.

  • 92.
    Queiroz, João
    et al.
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Atã, Pedro
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Intersemiotic Translation, Cognitive Artefact, and Creativity2019In: Adaptation, ISSN 1755-0637, E-ISSN 1755-0645, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 298-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intersemiotic translation (IT) can be described as a cognitive artefact designed as a predictive, generative, and metasemiotic tool that distributes artistic creativity. Cognitive artefacts have a huge variety of forms and are manipulated in many different ways and domains. As a projective augmented intelligence technique, IT works as a predictive tool, anticipating new, and surprising patterns of semiotic events and processes, keeping under control the emergence of new patterns. At the same time, it works as a generative model, providing new, unexpected, surprising data in the target-system,​​ and affording competing results​ ​which allow the system to generate candidate instances. As a metasemiotic tool, IT creates a metalevel semiotic process, a sign-action which stands for the action of a sign. It creates an ‘experimental laboratory’ for performing semiotic experiments. IT submits semiotic systems to unusual conditions and provides a scenario for observing the emergence of new and surprising semiotic behaviour as a result. We explore these ideas taking advantage of two examples of ITs to theatrical dance: (1) from one-point visual perspective to classical ballet and (2) from John Cage’s protocols of music indeterminacy to Merce Cunningham’s choreographic composition.

  • 93. Rickert, Heinrich
    Kulturvetenskap och naturvetenskap2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Rosén, Ulla
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Härnsten, Gunilla
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    The gender order of knowledge.: Everyday life in a welfare state2009In: Learning/Work.: Turning work and learning inside out. / [ed] Linda Cooper and Shirley Walters, Cape Town: Human Sciences Research Council , 2009, p. 220-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    McKenzie Wark: Molecular Red : Theory for the Anthropocene2016In: Ekfrase: Nordisk Tidsskrift for Visuell Kultur, ISSN 1891-5752, E-ISSN 1891-5760, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 74-77Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    "Our flame, the will-o'-the-wisp that dances in a few eyes, is soon to be blown out and all will fade": Nostalgia as Death Mood2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Central Saint Martin's College of Art, UK ; University of Leeds, UK.
    'blow into the freezing night': John Coltrane's 'Sheets of Sound' and the Actualization of a Dissentient Potential2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mode of improvisation, which Coltrane developed in the late 1950’s for a short period with his own band into the early 1960s, comprised a particular technique where scales are played very fast, over rapid chord changes and advanced substitutions, so that it appears as if entire scales, all possible combinations and variations, are played simultaneously, in a ferocious tempo, rupturing, opening up, both harmonic and rhythmic lines and patterns to a wider field of potential.

    This proposed paper takes this mode of improvisation – what Ira Girtler once referred to as Coltrane’s ‘sheets of sound’ – as its point of departure and attempts to explore it in terms of the actualization of virtual potentials within the context both of Coltrane’s later developments in modal and free form jazz, and the historical and socio-political situation in the USA at the time, which saw the emergence of more radical and militant forms of left-wing and civil rights activism. Drawing upon the writing of Spinoza, in particular the relation between the two notions of substantiaand potentia, and some of the ideas around virtuality and actualization put forth by Deleuze and Guattari, the paper attempts to link Coltrane’s music to this socio-political terrain not by means of interpretation or historical determination, but by delineating the site of an expanded aesthetics, operating through the virtual, throughthe actualization of virtual potentials, which is inexorably, albeit at times not obviously, linked also to a radical ethical and political program.

  • 98.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kafka and Deleuze/Guattari: Towards a Creative Critical Writing Practice2016In: Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, ISSN 0263-2764, E-ISSN 1460-3616, Vol. 33, no 7-8, p. 221-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing upon the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, in particular their writing on Franz Kafka, this article stakes out the ground for a creative critical writing practice beyond the confines of literature. Exploring the notion of writing in relation to affect constellations, what causes one to write, and expressions without content, how one begins to write, the argument put forth is that in rethinking the distinction Deleuze and Guattari tend to make between artistic practice and philosophical thought, a space is opened up for transversal lines that may cross between these fields in practices that are creative and critical and involve what Deleuze and Guattari refer to as aesthetic figures as well as conceptual personae. These practices, it is argued, provide a potential link between aesthetics, on the one hand, and ethics and politics, on the other.

  • 99.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Nicholas Thoburn, Anti-Book: On the Art and Politics of Radical Publishing (Minneapolis & London: University of Minnesota Press, 2016)2018In: Parallax, ISSN 1353-4645, E-ISSN 1460-700X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 513-517Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Collective CREative Dissent, UK.
    Simon O'Sullivan, Art Encounters Deleuze and Guattari : Thought Beyond Representation: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. 256 pp. ISBN 14039180902007In: Journal of Visual Culture, ISSN 1470-4129, E-ISSN 1741-2994, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 157-159Article, book review (Other academic)
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