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  • 51.
    Sävneby, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Jonsson, Nina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Svensson, P. Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hafenstein, Susan
    The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, USA.
    Lindberg, A. Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Virus derived from an Enterovirus B construct efficiently reverts from a frameshift mutation immediately beyond the translation initiation siteManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Tibblin, Petter
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hall, Marcus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Svensson, P. Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Merilä, Juha
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Forsman, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Phenotypic flexibility in background-mediated color change in sticklebacks2020In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Uddh Söderberg, Terese
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Berggren Kleja, Dan
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Sweden.
    Åström, Mats E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Jarsjö, Jerker
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Mats
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Sweden.
    Svensson, P. Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Metal solubility and transport at a contaminated landfill site – From the source zone into the groundwater2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1064-1076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risks associated with metal contaminated sites are tightly linked to material leachability and contaminant mobility. In this study, metal solubility and transport were characterized within a glass waste landfill through i) lysimeter-collection of pore water and standardized batch leaching tests, ii) soil profiles extending from the landfill surface, through unsaturated soil underneath, and into the groundwater zone, and iii) groundwater samples upstream, at, and downstream of the landfill. The soil analyzes targeted both pseudo-total and geochemically active concentrations of contaminant metals (As, Cd, Pb, Sb) and basic soil geochemistry (pH, org. C, Fe,Mn). Water samples were analyzed for dissolved, colloid-bound and particulate metals, and speciation modelling of the aqueous phase was conducted. The results revealed a highly contaminated system, with mean metal concentrationsin the waste zone between 90 and 250 times the regional background levels. Despite severe contamination of the waste zone and high geochemically active fractions (80–100%) of all contaminant metals as well as elevated concentrations in landfill pore water, the concentrations of Cd and Pb decrease abruptly at the transition between landfill and underlying natural soil and no indication of groundwater contamination was found. The efficient cation retention is likely due to the high pH. However, the sorption of As and Sb is weaker at such high pH,which explains their higher mobility from the pore water zone into groundwater. The field soil:solution for Pb, ranging from 140 to 2,900,000 l kg−1), despite little variability in basic geochemical variables, which we suggest is due to waste material heterogeneity.

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  • 54. van Lieshout, E.
    et al.
    Svensson, P. Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wong, B.B.M.
    Consequences of paternal care on pectoral fin allometry in a desert-dwelling fish2013In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 513-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positive static allometry is a scaling relationship where the relative size of traits covaries with adult body size. Traditionally, positive allometry is thought to result from either altered physiological requirements at larger body size or from strongly condition-dependent allocation under sexual selection. Yet, there are no theoretical reasons why positive allometry cannot evolve in fitness-related traits that are solely under the influence of natural selection. We investigated scaling and sexual dimorphism of a naturally selected trait, pectoral fin size, in comparison to a trait important in male–male combat, head width in natural populations of a fish, the desert goby Chlamydogobius eremius. Male desert gobies provide uniparental care and use their pectoral fins to fan the brood (often under hypoxic conditions); hence, larger fins are expected to be more efficient. Male pectoral fins do not appear to fulfil a signalling function in this species. We found that, for both pectoral fin size and head width, males exhibited positive allometric slopes and greater relative trait size (allometric elevation) than females. However, for head width, females also showed positive allometry, albeit to a lesser degree than males. Because fin locomotory function typically does not result in positive allometry, our findings indicate that other naturally selected uses, such as paternal care, can exaggerate trait scaling relationships.

  • 55. Wong, B. B. M.
    et al.
    Svensson, P. Andreas
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3800, Australia.
    Strategic male signalling effort in a desert-dwelling fish2009In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 543-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Males often use elaborate courtship displays to attract females for mating. Much attention, in this regard, has been focused on trying to understand the causes and consequences of signal variation among males. Far less, by contrast, is known about within-individual variation in signal expression and, in particular, the extent to which males may be able to strategically adjust their signalling output to try to maximise their reproductive returns. Here, we experimentally investigated male courtship effort in a fish, the Australian desert goby, Chlamydogobius eremius. When offered a simultaneous choice between a large and a small female, male gobies spent significantly more time associating with, and courting, the former, probably because larger females are also more fecund. Male signalling patterns were also investigated under a sequential choice scenario, with females presented one at a time. When first offered a female, male courtship was not affected by female size. However, males adjusted their courtship effort towards a second female depending on the size of the female encountered previously. In particular, males that were first offered a large female significantly reduced their courtship effort when presented with a subsequent, smaller, female. Our findings suggest that males may be able to respond adaptively to differences in female quality, and strategically adjust their signalling effort accordingly.

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