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  • 51.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Enhancing cultural resilience by learning to appreciate change and transformation2020In: Humantistic futures of learning: Perspectives from UNESCO Chairs and UNITWIN Networks / [ed] UNESCO, Paris: Unesco, 2020, p. 24-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author argues that shifting the narrative on cultural heritage from one of conservation and loss to a continuous process of change and transformation can build cultural resilience (i.e. the ability of cultural systems to absorb adversity). This change in perception can help us develop an appreciation of the transformative and evolving nature of the world – an understanding that can help us manage relations between present and future societies as well as inspire us to prepare for different possible imagined futures.

  • 52.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Entre culture populaire et science, la «marque archéologique»2008In: Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie, ISSN 0242-7702, Vol. 113, no September 2008, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Face-to-Face with the Past: Pompeii to Lejre2017In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Archaeopress, 2017, p. 175-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology has long been considered and portrayed as the discipline par excellence of things and material culture. Most valued by archaeologists and their audiences have been those sites and artefacts that are best preserved and thus seemingly allowing direct glimpses of past realities. Throughout the history of the discipline of archaeology ancient artefacts never left centre stage, although the way in which, according to the archaeologists, their significance emerged in the present has changed considerably over the decades and centuries. In this chapter I argue that over the past decade or so an alternative framework for interpreting the past and its remains has been gaining ground in contemporary society. Staged performances, scripted or improvised play and virtual simulation now allow many people face-to-face encounters with the past without the need of preserved things from antiquity. The significance of things in archaeology has changed as bodily sensations and evocative narratives are substituting for tangible evidence and hands-on experiments. Objects still play a significant role though; as props they facilitate storytelling and contribute to holistic time travel experiences. A case in point for this significant development is provided by the changing character of visitor experiences at archaeological open-air museums where the past is brought to life. This chapter is based on fieldwork at Land of Legends, Lejre, Denmark.

  • 54.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Forum on Nara+20: Heritage and Society 8 (2)2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    ‘From One Monkey to Another’: Death and Memory in Zoos and Animal Sanctuaries2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 301-303Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I explore relationships between human and animal commemoration in zoological gardens and animal sanctuaries. Archaeologists, including Anders Andrén, have emphasised the complex ontological, cosmological and social interactions of people and animals in past societies. Investigating the contemporary commemoration of captive beasts in zoos and animal sanctuaries, as part of an archaeology of zoos, reveals that such approaches might also apply to the present day.

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  • 56.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    From Stonehenge to Las Vegas. Archaeology as Popular Culture2005Book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    GRASCA: Linnaeus University and several archaeological companies want to shape the future of Swedish contract archaeology2015In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, no 43, p. 96-98Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Heritage Futures in Interstellar (2014)2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Heritage: Public Perceptions2014In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer, 2014, p. 3361-3366Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the public domain, heritage is perceived and widely appreciated in relation to stories which people tell about themselves. This applies in particular to the perception of cultural heritage in public life within so-called Western societies. Intriguingly, heritage is here often not valued for its literal content, that is, what it reveals about a past reality, but for its metaphorical content, that is, the stories it evokes about present reality. Such stories may establish social distinction through the onlooker’s display of knowledge that is considered desirable; they may manifest belonging through symbolic references of heritage to a common past suggesting a shared collective identity; or they may describe alternative ways of life which can stimulate audiences in the process of reconsidering their own lives. All such stories are sometimes used politically or for commercial purposes.

  • 60.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Heritage: Public Perceptions2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the public domain, heritage is perceived and widely appreciated in relation to stories which people tell about themselves.

  • 61.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Heritage Values in Contemporary Popular Culture2010In: Heritage Values in Contemporary Society / [ed] George S. Smith, Phyllis M. Messenger, Hilary A. Soderland, Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press Inc., 2010, p. 43-54Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Imagine This: Archaeology in the Experience Society2011In: Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf and Angela Piccini, Frankfurt/M: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2011, 2, p. 47-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Imagine This: Archaeology in the Experience Society2009In: Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf and Angela Piccini, Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009, p. 47-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 64. Holtorf, Cornelius
    Interview with Prof. Cornelius Holtorf: University of Linnaeus, Sweden2018In: The Zebra's Voice, p. 92-94Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 65.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Introduction: The Meaning of Time Travel2017In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Archaeopress, 2017, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introductory paper I discuss the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. My discussion covers some of the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling. I also discuss whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfilment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present. 

  • 66.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Ironic heritage: Overcoming divisions between communities through shared laughter about the past2010In: Museum International, ISSN 1350-0775, E-ISSN 1468-0033, Vol. 62, no 1-2, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The essentializing and exclusive nature of collective identities defined by cultural heritage often fuels conflicts between nations and other social groups. In this article I ask what kind of heritage might be able to unite rather than divide civil society. I suggest that heritage can only contribute to social cohesion when it is perceived as distant from everyone in present society. Such distance is achieved not only through freely invented, inauthentic heritage, but also through ironicized heritage, using humour to undermine conventional understandings of the subject. I present several specific examples of such ironic heritage, which have sought to provoke laughter and, thus, create implicit social bonds across national, political and social divisions.

  • 67.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    JCA Book Reviews: Wallanderland. Medieturisme og skandinavisk TV-krimi by Anne Marit Waade2015In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3437Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish media theorist Anne Marit Waade explores in this timely study the phenomenon of media tourism, using tourism in the footsteps of Inspector Kurt Wallander as her example. The character of Wallander was invented in 1991 by the bestselling Swedish author Henning Mankell, one of the most successful authors of Nordic crime novels in recent decades, and further developed until 2009. The literary original has been translated and become successful in many countries including the UK, the US and Germany. The books were also adapted into several different TV series in Sweden (1994–2007, with Rolf Lassgård as Wallander, and 2004–2010, with Krister Henriksson) and in the UK (2008–2010, with Kenneth Branagh).

  • 68.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Kritische Archäologie ist angewandte Archäologie (open access)2012In: Forum Kritische Archäologie, ISSN 2194-346X, Vol. 1, p. 100-103Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    L’apport du patrimoine culturel à la société: changements en cours2011In: Museum International (French edition), ISSN 1020-2226, Vol. 63, no 1-2, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    Dans la période récente, la réflexion sur le patrimoine culturel a passablement évolué dans le monde. Cet article examine ce que sera sans doute l’apport du patrimoine culturel à la société du xxie siècle en faisant valoir qu’aujourd’hui, pour la première fois depuis quelque 200 ans, son utilité pour la société ne paraît plus définitivement acquise, mais change au contraire rapidement. Si l’on veut qu’elle puisse être exploitée, il nous faut repenser de fond en comble ce que le patrimoine culturel peut signifier et faire dans la société contemporaine.

  • 70.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Learning from Las Vegas: Archaeology in the Experience Economy2007In: The SAA Archaeological Record, ISSN 1532-7299, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 6-10,25Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Making futures and making connections across sectors2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Heritage Futures project is about bringing together practitioners from different sectors of society and making them reflect about their future-making practices from innovative perspectives and in unconventional ways. One such match-making involves the cultural heritage and nuclear waste sectors.

  • 72.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Material animals: an archaeology of contemporary zoo experiences2013In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Contemporary World / [ed] Paul Graves-Brown, Rodney Harrison and Angela Piccini, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 1, p. 627-641Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I am offering an archaeological perspective on contemporary zoo experiences. Archaeologists are, among other things, used to studying material culture, not only regarding their patterns in space and time but also within larger theoretical frameworks. Here, I focus specifically on an analysis of material animals as part of the zoo experience, with implications for the role of living animals. Fittingly in the Experience Economy, I am adopting an experience-directed mindset (as defined by Pine and Gilmore 2011), foregrounding how zoo experiences are designed and how visitors in turn experience what they find in zoos. This study of contemporary material culture in the zoo turns out to be well suited to exploring previously neglected aspects of what visitors experience in a zoo. It emerges, among other things, that visiting a zoo is about something else than what it appears to be at face value as living animals are not as central to the zoo experience as is often assumed. My argument proceeds by first making some theoretical distinctions on which the following analysis of animal representations and animal reifications will be based. I conclude with a broader discussion of the developing character of zoo experiences on the one hand and of the potential of contemporary archaeologies on the other hand.

  • 73.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Meta-stories of archaeology2010In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 381-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I argue that archaeologists contribute most to the contemporary ‘experience society’ when they tell stories. Such stories well told may be either about what happened in the past or about how archaeology proceeds. Far more significant, however, are the meta-stories of archaeology. These are defined as stories of archaeology in which contemporary audiences themselves feature as characters, engulfed in a plot about archaeology or the past that gives meaning and perspective to their presentday lives. Such meta-stories may draw on metaphorical meanings that resonate in the practices of professional archaeology. In this paper, however, the emphasis is put on another type of meta-story that explores, in relation to the past, what it means to be human, who we are as members of a particular human group and how we might be living under different circumstances. I argue that archaeologists need to get better at understanding and critically appreciating the overarching metastories they evoke. For archaeology matters when its meta-stories matter.

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  • 74.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Monte da Igreja, Torre de Coelheiros, Évora: Gedanken zur ‘Lebensgeschichte’ eines Megalithgrabes2010In: Beiträge zur Vor- und Frühgeschichte der Iberischen Halbinsel und Mitteleuropas: Studien in honorem Philine Kalb / [ed] T. Armbrüster, M. Hegewisch, Bonn: Verlag Dr. Rudolf Habelt GMBH, 2010, p. 273-279Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses a life-history approach concerning prehistoric monuments. I argue that prehistoric monuments had lives that extended from their construction in prehistoric times up to the present day and that it is important to give all episodes of these lives the same archaeological attention. My case-study is the excavation project at Monte da Igreja near Évora in the central Alentejo in Portugal. This project set as its task to apply a life-history approach to an archaeological field project. Even the archaeologists themselves are not considered to stand somehow beyond the site’s life-history but instead they are seen very much as part of the site’s life itself – and are therefore being studied as well.

  • 75.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Wales, Lampeter, Department of Archaeology.
    Monumental Past: The Life-histories of Megalithic Monuments in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (Germany)1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    My Historic Environment2011In: The Historic Environment: Policy & Practice, ISSN 1756-7505, E-ISSN 1756-7513, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 157-159Article in journal (Other academic)
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    Manuscript My historic environment
  • 77.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Nauki płynące z Las Vegas: Archeologia w "gospodarce doświadczeń'2012In: Archeologia Żywa, ISSN 1426-7055, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 39-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [pl]

    Archeologia stanowi ważny element tematycznych parków rozrywki, które są charakterystyczne dla współczesnej kultury popularnej. Do archeologii nawiązano w takich miejscach jak Disneyland czy Las Vegas Strip.

  • 78.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    New horizons2015In: Rymden och människan: Rymdforskning i humaniora, konst och samhällsvetenskap, , p. 1p. 16-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    No Farewell to Interpretation2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 57-60Article in journal (Other academic)
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    Holtorf No Farewell
  • 80.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Notes on the life history of a pot sherd2002In: Journal of Material Culture, Vol. 7, p. 49-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Notes on the Lifehistory of a Potshard2009In: The Modern Historiography Reader. Western Sources, Abingdon and New York: Routledge , 2009, p. 497-504Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    On Pastness: A Reconsideration of Materiality in Archaeological Object Authenticity2013In: Anthropological Quarterly, ISSN 0003-5491, E-ISSN 1534-1518, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 427-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for a modified constructivist approach to archaeological object authenticity which takes the object’s materiality seriously. This is accomplished by defining authenticity not in relation to the age of an object but to its age-value, i.e., the quality or condition of being (of the) past—its pastness. Pastness is the result of a particular perception or experience. It derives from, among others, material clues indicating wear and tear, decay, and disintegration. These material clues, and thus the presence of pastness, can be created entirely in the present.

  • 83.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    On the Possibility of Time Travel2010In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 15-16, p. 31-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time travel can be defined as an experience and social practice in the present that evokes a past (or future) reality. In this paper I introduce popular time travel as a significant phenomenon of the Experience or Dream Society and the fast developing Experience-Industry. I also consider in what way time travel can be said to be real rather than imaginary. Discussion is offered concerning the experience in time travels of a seemingly non-mediated "presence" of pastness, denoting a perceived contemporary quality or condition of being past. The final part of the paper addresses some implications and issues associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travel in present-day society, and points to a number of important issues that warrant further discussion in the future.

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  • 84.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    One World Archaeology Today2006In: Archaeologies. Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, Vol. 2, p. 87-93Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Pastness in Themed Environments2016In: A Reader in Themed and Immersive Spaces / [ed] Scott A. Lucas, Pittsburgh: ETC Press, 2016, p. 31-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theme parks and other themed environments commonly evoke stories about the past in order to provide their customers and audiences with enjoyable experiences, often giving the impression that they are immersed in the past. Usually, such depictions of the past are only very loosely related either to historical accounts based on academic research or to surviving remains of the past. Drawing on previous research, I discuss with examples in this paper how the past is designed in theme parks and other themed environments by an evocation of pastness. Pastness is diÑerent from age and denotes the perceived quality that a given object is of the past. Pastness is not immanent in an object but may derive from the object’s physical condition (for example, visible decay), its immediate context (for example, suggestive association in a museum or historic town center), or preconceived understandings of the audience (for example, expectations about historic appearance). I conclude by discussing the signifcance of Öctitious heritage in themed environments and indeed in society at large. 

  • 86.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Perceiving the Past: From Age Value to Pastness2017In: International Journal of Cultural Property, ISSN 0940-7391, E-ISSN 1465-7317, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 497-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Austrian art historian Alois Riegl (1857–1905), cultural heritage possesses age value (Alterswert) based on the perception of an object’s visible traces of age. His 1903 essay “The Modern Cult of Monuments” became a classic, and age value has ever since been constitutive for cultural heritage. Closer scrutiny, however, reveals that clever copies, reconstructions, and imaginative inventions can possess age value too. I therefore suggest “pastness” as a useful term for denoting the perception that a given object is “of the past.” Pastness is not immanent in an object but, rather, results from its appearance (for example, patina), its context (for example, in a museum), or its correspondence with preconceived expectations among the audience. In this article, I review the concept of pastness and discuss its implications for the global heritage sector. Age value emerges as being less universal than Riegl thought and was linked to a very particular intellectual and cultural context. 

  • 87.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Popular culture and archaeology2008In: Encyclopedia of Archaeology / [ed] D. Pearsall, New York: Academic Press , 2008, p. 1859-1868Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Popular Culture, Portrayal of Archaeology: Archaeology on Screen2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 650-651Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Popular Culture, Portrayal of Archaeology in: Archaeology as a Theme2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 653-654Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Popular Culture, Portrayal of Archaeology in: Archaeology in Fiction and Nonfiction2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 651-652Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Por que preservar?2017In: Revista de Arqueologia, ISSN 1982-1999, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 193-207Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Preservation Paradigm in Heritage Management2014In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer, 2014, p. 6128-6131Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of preservation is the basic paradigm of all heritage management, including archaeological heritage management. Heritage experts often take for granted that remains of the past are inherently valuable and deserve to be maintained in perpetuity.

  • 93.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Preservation Paradigm in Heritage Management2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of preservation is the basic paradigm of all heritage management, including archaeological heritage management. Heritage experts often take for granted that remains of the past are inherently valuable and deserve to be maintained in perpetuity.

  • 94.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Radical Constructivism: Knowledge Beyond Epistemology2009In: Tomsk State University Bulletin, ISSN 1561-7793, Vol. 329, p. 77-80Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 95.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Real Archeology: The Medialization of archeological Knowledge in the Field of Tension between Science and Public2013In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 580-582Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Recipe for unlearning2019In: Oikology: A book about building and home making for permaculture and for making our home together on Earth / [ed] Mathilda Tham, Åsa Ståhl, Sara Hyltén-Cavallius, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2019, p. 139-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Renforcer la résilience culturelle en apprenant à apprécier le changement et la transformation2020In: Les futurs humanistes de l’apprentissage: Perspectives des chaires UNESCO et des réseaux UNITWIN / [ed] UNESCO, Paris: Unesco, 2020, p. 24-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    L’auteur soutient que l’on peut renforcer la résilience culturelle (la capacité des systèmes culturels à s’accommoder de l’adversité), en ne présentant plus le patrimoine culturel comme un processus de conservation et de perte, mais plutôt comme un processus continu de changement et de transformation. Cette nouvelle perception peut nous aider à apprécier la nature transformationnelle et évolutive du monde – grâce à une compréhension qui nous aidera à gérer les relations entre les sociétés présentes et futures et nous encouragera à nous préparer à différents futurs imaginés.

  • 98.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [review of:] Diane Barthel-Bouchier, Cultural heritage and the challenge of sustainability2013In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 199-204Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [Review of] Homeless heritage. Collaborative social archaeology as therapeutic practice: Rachel Kiddey, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288 pp., $85 (hardcover), ISBN 97801987468672018In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 73-75Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Review of J. Hines (2004) Voices in the past. English Literature and Archaeology2008In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 113-116Article, book review (Other academic)
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