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  • 51.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Fridolfsson, Emil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bertos-Fortis, Mireia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Larsson, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University.
    Interannual variability of phyto-bacterioplankton biomass and production in coastal and offshore waters of the Baltic Sea2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no supplement 3, p. S427-S438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microbial part of the pelagic food web is seldom characterized in models despite its major contribution to biogeochemical cycles. In the Baltic Sea, spatial and temporal high frequency sampling over three years revealed changes in heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton coupling (biomass and production) related to hydrographic properties of the ecosystem. Phyto- and bacterioplankton were bottom-up driven in both coastal and offshore areas. Cold winter temperature was essential for phytoplankton to conform to the successional sequence in temperate waters. In terms of annual carbon production, the loss of the spring bloom (diatoms and dinoflagellates) after mild winters tended not to be compensated for by other taxa, not even summer cyanobacteria. These results improve our ability to project Baltic Sea ecosystem response to short- and long-term environmental changes.

  • 52.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    An eutrophication related mechanism explaining the proliferation of toxic algae in the Baltic Sea2001Report (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Effect of nutrient ratios on harmful phytoplankton and their toxin production2000Report (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Induced phagotrophy in the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra1998In: Aquatic microbial ecology, Vol. 15, p. 65-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hussenot, J
    Rincé, Y
    Joassard, L
    Mornet, F
    Pirastru, L
    Mass production of microalgae in salt ponds (L Houmeau, France) with farm fertilizer di-ammonium phosphate in addition with silicon1991In: EAS Special Publication 14, 1991, p. 187-188Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, N
    Johnsen, G
    Borsheim, K Y
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Phagotrophy and toxicity variation in the mixotrophic Prymnesium patelliferum (Haptophyceae)2001In: Limnology and oceanography, Vol. 46(5), p. 1208-1214Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johnsen, G
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sakshaug, E
    Effect of polyamines on growth and toxicity of Chrysochromulina leadbeateri (Haptophyte)2001In: Intergov Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, Paris 2001 / [ed] Hallegraeff GM, Blackburn SI, Bolch CJ, Lewis RJ, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Olofsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mikroalgers potential inom biofiltering av industriell rökgas och processvatten2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Malinsky-Rushansky, NZ
    Organic production and excretion by different phytoplankton size classes1993In: WI Li & Sy Maestrini (eds) ICES Marine Science Symposia Measurements of primary production from the molar to the global scale, 1993Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olofsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Growing algae in Scandinavia: utopia or opportunity?2011In: Algae: The sustainable biomass for the future.: Perspectives from the submariner project algae cooperation event Trelleborg, Sweden - September 28-29, 2011., Berlin, Germany: s.Pro sustainable projects GmbH , 2011, p. 16-17Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rengefors, Karin
    Fistarol, Giovana
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Allelopathy in phytoplankton – biochemical, ecological and evolutionary aspects2003In: Phycologia, Vol. 42(4), p. 406-419Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Legrand, Catherine
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sæmundsdottir, S
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Phagotrophy in Chrysochromulina polylepis (Prymnesiophyceae): ingestion of Fluorescent Labelled Algae (FLA) under different nutrient conditions1996In: Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO In: Yasumoto T, Oshima Y, Fukuyo Y (eds) Harmful and Toxic Algal Blooms, Paris, 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Finnish Environm Inst, Finland.
    Jerney, J.
    Finnish Environm Inst, Finland.
    Le Tortorec, A.
    Finnish Environm Inst, Finland.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Savela, H.
    Univ Turku, Finland.
    Svahn, E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Suikkanen, S.
    Finnish Environm Inst, Finland.
    Kremp, A.
    Finnish Environm Inst, Finland.
    Nitrogen Supply Mechanisms in Toxic Dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii - the Key to Bloom Expansion in Coastal Baltic Waters?2017In: Phycologia, ISSN 0031-8884, E-ISSN 2330-2968, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 118-119Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Briggen Tre Kronor: Algoland2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University.
    Sjöstedt, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Baltar, Federico
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities2015In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 6, article id 223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, increasing loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundances than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating a replacement effect. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating an adjustment effect. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, a priming effect resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial ecosystem process rates.

  • 66.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Sjöstedt, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol.
    Baltar, Federico
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    Hugerth, Luisa
    KTH Royal Inst Technol.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Muthusamy, Sarala Devi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Disentangling seasonal bacterioplankton population dynamics by high-frequency sampling2015In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 2459-2476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiyear comparisons of bacterioplankton succession reveal that environmental conditions drive community shifts with repeatable patterns between years. However, corresponding insight into bacterioplankton dynamics at a temporal resolution relevant for detailed examination of variation and characteristics of specific populations within years is essentially lacking. During 1 year, we collected 46 samples in the Baltic Sea for assessing bacterial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing (nearly twice weekly during productive season). Beta-diversity analysis showed distinct clustering of samples, attributable to seemingly synchronous temporal transitions among populations (populations defined by 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity). A wide spectrum of bacterioplankton dynamics was evident, where divergent temporal patterns resulted both from pronounced differences in relative abundance and presence/absence of populations. Rates of change in relative abundance calculated for individual populations ranged from 0.23 to 1.79 day(-1). Populations that were persistently dominant, transiently abundant or generally rare were found in several major bacterial groups, implying evolution has favoured a similar variety of life strategies within these groups. These findings suggest that high temporal resolution sampling allows constraining the timescales and frequencies at which distinct populations transition between being abundant or rare, thus potentially providing clues about physical, chemical or biological forcing on bacterioplankton community structure.

  • 67.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University.
    Sjöstedt, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University;Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Local Environmental Conditions Shape Generalist But Not Specialist Components of Microbial Metacommunities in the Baltic Sea2016In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, p. 1-10, article id 2078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine microbes exhibit biogeographical patterns linked with fluxes of matter and energy. Yet, knowledge of the mechanisms shaping bacterioplankton community assembly across temporal scales remains poor. We examined bacterioplankton 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained from Baltic Sea transects to determine phylogenetic relatedness and assembly processes coupled with niche breadth. Communities were phylogenetically more related over time than expected by chance, albeit with considerable temporal variation. Hence, habitat filtering, i.e., local environmental conditions, rather than competition structured bacterioplankton communities in summer but not in spring or autumn. Species sorting (SS) was the dominant assembly process, but temporal and taxonomical variation in mechanisms was observed. For May communities, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria exhibited SS while Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were assembled by SS and mass effect. Concomitantly, Gammaproteobacteria were assembled by the neutral model and patch dynamics. Temporal variation in habitat filtering and dispersal highlights the impact of seasonally driven reorganization of microbial communities. Typically abundant Baltic Sea populations such as the NS3a marine group (Bacteroidetes) and the SAR86 and SAR11 clade had the highest niche breadth. The verrucomicrobial Spartobacteria population also exhibited high niche breadth. Surprisingly, variation in bacterioplankton community composition was regulated by environmental factors for generalist taxa but not specialists. Our results suggest that generalists such as NS3a, SAR86, and SAR11 are reorganized to a greater extent by changes in the environment compared to specialists and contribute more strongly to determining overall biogeographical patterns of marine bacterial communities.

  • 68.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University.
    Sjöstedt, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University ; Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Ekstam, Börje
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hugerth, Luisa
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hu, Yue
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Metapopulation theory identifies biogeographical patterns among core and satellite marine bacteria scaling from tens to thousands of kilometers2017In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 1222-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metapopulation theory developed in terrestrial ecology provides applicable frameworks for interpreting the role of local and regional processes in shaping species distribution patterns. Yet, empirical testing of metapopulation models on microbial communities is essentially lacking. We determined regional bacterioplankton dynamics from monthly transect sampling in the Baltic Sea Proper using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A strong positive trend was found between local relative abundance and occupancy of populations. Notably, the occupancy-frequency distributions were significantly bimodal with a satellite mode of rare endemic populations and a core mode of abundant cosmopolitan populations (e.g. Synechococcus, SAR11 and SAR86 clade members). Temporal changes in population distributions supported several theoretical frameworks. Still, bimodality was found among bacterioplankton communities across the entire Baltic Sea, and was also frequent in globally distributed datasets. Datasets spanning waters with widely different physicochemical characteristics or environmental gradients typically lacked significant bimodal patterns. When such datasets were divided into subsets with coherent environmental conditions, bimodal patterns emerged, highlighting the importance of positive feedbacks between local abundance and occupancy within specific biomes. Thus, metapopulation theory applied to microbial biogeography can provide novel insights into the mechanisms governing shifts in biodiversity resulting from natural or anthropogenically induced changes in the environment.

  • 69. Malinsky-Rushansky, NZ
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Excretion of dissolved organic carbon by phytoplankton of different size and subsequent bacterial uptake1996In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 132, p. 249-255Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Mazur-Marzec, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Bertos-Fortis, Mireia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Torunska-Sitarz, Anna
    University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Fidor, Anna
    University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Chemical and Genetic Diversity of Nodularia spumigena from the Baltic Sea2016In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 14, no 11, article id 209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nodularia spumigena is a toxic, filamentous cyanobacterium occurring in brackish waters worldwide, yet forms extensive recurrent blooms in the Baltic Sea. N. spumigena produces several classes of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) that are active against several key metabolic enzymes. Previously, strains from geographically distant regions showed distinct NRP metabolic profiles. In this work, conspecific diversity in N. spumigena was studied using chemical and genetic approaches. NRP profiles were determined in 25 N. spumigena strains isolated in different years and from different locations in the Baltic Sea using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Genetic diversity was assessed by targeting the phycocyanin intergenic spacer and flanking regions (cpcBA-IGS). Overall, 14 spumigins, 5 aeruginosins, 2 pseudaeruginosins, 2 nodularins, 36 anabaenopeptins, and one new cyanopeptolin-like peptide were identified among the strains. Seven anabaenopeptins were new structures; one cyanopeptolin-like peptide was discovered in N. spumigena for the first time. Based on NRP profiles and cpcBA-IGS sequences, the strains were grouped into two main clusters without apparent influence of year and location, indicating persistent presence of these two subpopulations in the Baltic Sea. This study is a major step in using chemical profiling to explore conspecific diversity with a higher resolution than with a sole genetic approach.

  • 71.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Del Pino, Victoria
    NECTON Company, Portugal.
    Lamela, Teresa
    NECTON Company, Portugal.
    Bergé, Jean Pascal
    Ifremer Nantes, France.
    Nilsson, Emmelie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Are algal oil yield estimations dependent on seasonal variation?2011In: Algae: The sustainable biomass for the future. Perspectives from the submariner project algae cooperation event Trelleborg, Sweden - September 28-29, 2011 / [ed] Cecilia Torres, Berlin, Germany: s.Pro-sustainable projects GmbH , 2011, p. 44-45Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 72.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Lamela, Teresa
    Nilsson, Emmelie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bergé, Jean Pascal
    del Pino, Victória
    Uronen, Pauliina
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Seasonal variation of lipids and fatty acids of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata grown in outdoor large-scale photobioreactors2012In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 1577-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While focus in oil-producing microalgae is normally on nutrient deficiency, we

    addressed the seasonal variations of lipid content and composition in large-scale

    cultivation. Lipid content, fatty acid profiles and mono- di- and triglycerides (MAGs,

    DAGs, and TAGs) were analyzed during May 2007–May 2009 in Nannochloropsis oculata

    grown outdoors in closed vertical flat panels photobioreactors. Total lipids (TL) ranged

    from 11% of dry weight (DW) in winter to 30% of DW in autumn. 50% of the variation in

    TL could be explained by light and temperature. As the highest lipid content was recorded

    during autumn indicating an optimal, non-linear, response to light and temperature we

    hypothesize that enhanced thylakoid stacking under reduced light conditions resulted in

    more structural lipids, concomitantly with the increase in glycerides due to released

    photo-oxidative stress. The relative amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA)

    increased during autumn. This suggested a synthesis, either of structural fatty acids as

    MUFA, or a relative increase of C16:1 incorporated into TAGs and DAGs. Our results

    emphasize the significant role of environmental conditions governing lipid content and 

    composition in microalgae that have to be considered for correct estimation of algal oil

    yields in biodiesel production.

  • 73.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lamela, Teresa
    Necton SA, Olhao, Portugal.
    Nilsson, Emmelie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bergé, Jean-Pascal
    IFREMER, Nantes, France.
    del Pino, Victória
    Necton SA, Olhao, Portugal.
    Uronen, Pauliina
    Neste Oil, Ctr Technol, Porvoo, Finland.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Combined Effects of Nitrogen Concentration and Seasonal Changes on the Production of Lipids in Nannochloropsis oculata 2014In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1891-1910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instead of sole nutrient starvation to boost algal lipid production, we addressed nutrient limitation at two different seasons (autumn and spring) during outdoor cultivation in flat panel photobioreactors. Lipid accumulation, biomass and lipid productivity and changes in fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis oculata were investigated under nitrogen (N) limitation (nitrate:phosphate N:P 5, N:P 2.5 molar ratio). N. oculata was able to maintain a high biomass productivity under N-limitation compared to N-sufficiency (N:P 20) at both seasons, which in spring resulted in nearly double lipid productivity under N-limited conditions (0.21 g L−1 day−1) compared to N-sufficiency (0.11 g L−1 day−1). Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased from 76% to nearly 90% of total fatty acids in N-limited cultures. Higher biomass and lipid productivity in spring could, partly, be explained by higher irradiance, partly by greater harvesting rate (~30%). Our results indicate the potential for the production of algal high value products (i.e., polyunsaturated fatty acids) during both N-sufficiency and N-limitation. To meet the sustainability challenges of algal biomass production, we propose a dual-system process: Closed photobioreactors producing biomass for high value products and inoculum for larger raceway ponds recycling waste/exhaust streams to produce bulk chemicals for fuel, feed and industrial material.

  • 74.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    ALGOLAND – Recovery: Avfall används för att producera en värdefull produkt - algbiomassa2017In: Linnaeus Technical Centre (LTC) och Linnaeus Innovation Design Lab (Lidlab), May 8th 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Frick, Brage
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Svensson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Baltic Sea microalgae transform cement flue gas into valuable biomass2015In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 11, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show high feasibility of using cement industrial flue gas as CO2 source for microalgal cultivation. The toxicity of cement flue gas (12-15% CO2) on algal biomass production and composition (lipids, proteins, carbohydrates) was tested using monocultures (Tetraselmis sp., green algae, Skeletonema marinoi, diatom) and natural brackish communities. The performance of a natural microalgal community dominated by spring diatoms was compared to a highly productive diatom monoculture S. marinoi fed with flue gas or air-CO2 mixture. Flue gas was not toxic to any of the microalgae tested. Instead we show high quality of microalgal biomass (lipids 20-30% DW, proteins 20-28% DW, carbohydrates 15-30% DW) and high production when cultivated with flue gas addition compared to CO2-air. Brackish Baltic Sea microalgal communities performed equally or better in terms of biomass quality and production than documented monocultures of diatom and green algae, often used in algal research and development. Hence, we conclude that microalgae should be included in biological solutions to transform waste into renewable resources in coastal waters. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  • 76.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Production stability and biomass quality in microalgal cultivation: contribution of community dynamics2019In: Engineering in Life Sciences, ISSN 1618-0240, E-ISSN 1618-2863, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 330-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prospect of using constructed communities of microalgae in algal cultivation wasconfirmed in this study. Three constructed communities of diatoms (Diatom), greenalgae (Green) and cyanobacteria (Cyano), were each mixed with a natural communityof microalgae as baseline. The communities were cultivated in batch and semicontinuousmode and fed CO2 or cement flue gas (12-15 % CO2). Diatom had thehighest growth rate but Green had the highest yield. Dynamic changes in thecommunity composition occurred from start through batch to semi-steady state. Greenalgae were the most competitive group during the experiment. Euglenoids wererecruited from scarce species in the natural community and became a large part of thebiomass in semi-steady state in all communities. High temporal and yield stabilitywas demonstrated in all communities during semi-steady state. Biochemicalcomposition (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) was similar for the threecommunities with lipids ranging 14-26 % of dry weight (DW), proteins (15-28 %DW) and carbohydrates (9-23 % DW). Filamentous cyanobacteria were outcompetedearly in the experiment. However, their minute presence in Cyano associated withhigher lipid and lower carbohydrates compared to Diatom and Green, suggesting theimportance of chemical interactions among microorganisms. Our results indicate thatculture functions (stability, biomass quality) were maintained while dynamic changesoccurred in community composition. We propose that a multi-species communityapproach can aid sustainability in microalgal cultivation, through complementary useof resources and higher culture stability. Local environmental conditions,complementary microalgal traits, and interactions among functional groups (algae,bacteria) should be considered in community design where natural succession andcrop rotation will likely provide stability for commercial-scale algal cultivation.

  • 77.
    Paczkowska, J
    et al.
    Umeå University ; Umeå Marine Science Centre.
    Rowe, OF
    Umeå University ; Umeå Marine Science Centre ; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Schlüter, L
    DHI Water & Environment, Denmark.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Karlson, B
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Andersson, A
    Umeå University ; Umeå Marine Science Centre.
    Allochthonous matter: an important factor shaping the phytoplankton community in the Baltic Sea2017In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 23-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well-known that nutrients shape phytoplankton communities in marine systems, but in coastal waters allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM) may also be of central importance. We studied how humic substances (proxy of ADOM) and other variables influenced the nutritional strategies, size structure and pigment content of the phytoplankton community along a south–north gradient in the Baltic Sea. During the summer, the proportion of mixotrophs increased gradually from the phosphorus-rich south to the ADOM-rich north, probably due to ADOM-fueled microbes. The opposite trend was observed for autotrophs. The chlorophyll a(Chl a): carbon (C) ratio increased while the levels of photoprotective pigments decreased from south to north, indicating adaptation to the darker humic-rich water in the north. Picocyanobacteria dominated in phosphorus-rich areas while nanoplankton increased in ADOM-rich areas. During the winter–spring the phytoplankton biomass and concentrations of photoprotective pigments were low, and no trends with respect to autotrophs and mixotrophs were observed. Microplankton was the dominant size group in the entire study area. We conclude that changes in the size structure of the phytoplankton community, the Chl a:C ratio and the concentrations of photoprotective pigments are indicative of changes in ADOM, a factor of particular importance in a changing climate.

  • 78. Peperzak, L
    et al.
    Sandee, B
    Jonker, R
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Measurement of Prorocentrum micans growth rates by flow analysis of the diel DNA cycle1998In: Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, Paris, 1998 / [ed] Reguera I et al, Vigo, Spain, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Persson, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bergström, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mazur Marzec, Hanna
    University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Differential tolerance to cyanobacterial exposure between geographically distinct populations of Perca fluviatilis2013In: Toxicon, ISSN 0041-0101, E-ISSN 1879-3150, no 76, p. 178-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are an important problem worldwide. Cyanobacteria may negatively impact young-of-the-year (YOY) fish directly (toxin production, turbidity, decrease in water quality) or indirectly (trophic toxin transfer, changes in prey species composition). Here we test whether there are any differences in cyanobacterial tolerance between four geographically distinct populations of European perch (Perca fluviatilis). We show that P. fluviatilis may develop tolerance against cyanobacteria demonstrated by the ability of individuals from a marine site (exposed to annual cyanobacterial blooms) to increase their detoxification more than individuals from an oligotrophic site (rarely exposed to cyanobacteria). Our results also revealed significant interaction effects between genotypes within a population and response to cyanobacterial exposure in terms of absolute growth and detoxification activity. This genotype by treatment interaction may result in local adaptations to cyanobacterial exposure in P. fluviatilis. Hence, the sensitivity against cyanobacterial exposure may differ between within species populations increasing the importance of local management of fish populations.

  • 80.
    Persson, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olsson, Thomas
    Toxicon, Sweden.
    Detection of nodularin in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) in the west coast of Sweden: evidence of nodularin mediated oxidative stress2009In: Harmful Algae, ISSN 1568-9883, E-ISSN 1878-1470, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 832-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brackish, bloom-forming cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena produces a peptide called nodularin, which may induce liver damage in fish. In the summer of 2007, nodularin was detected in liver tissue of European flounder caught in Swedish waters of Öresund, within the upper salinity limit for N. spumigena. Nodularinconcentrations ranging between 22 and 557 μg kg−1 liver (d.w.) were detected in fish liver. Nodularin was not detected in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Although N. spumigena blooms can occur in the area, the cyanobacteria were only present in very small amounts in 2007. Results suggested that nodularin accumulated inflounder livers during the summer of 2006, when vast N. spumigena blooms were observed in Öresund, and persisted over several months. Nodularin has previously been shown to induce oxidative stress in mice, crustaceans and mollusks but work on the potential negative effects of nodularin on fish is still scarce. To examine the dynamics of nodularin induced oxidative stress in liver tissue of flounder, the differential responses of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione-S-transferase catalase(CAT) and the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) were monitored during 14 days in flounder exposed to an intraperitoneal injection of nodularin (0, 2, 10 and 50 μg nodularin kg−1 body weight). The activities of GST and CAT in the liver decreased significantly in the 50 μg nodularin kg−1 exposure after 7 days, but were restored to control levels after an additional 10 days of recovery. The results suggested that nodularin induced oxidative stress in terms of decreased GST and CATactivity, which can result in increased vulnerability of the cell to reactive oxygen species (ROS). No significant changes could be found in MDA levels between the treatments. Thus, the antioxidant defense system presumably managed to prevent oxygen mediated toxicity as seen by the unchanged levels of MDA. Alteration of the enzymatic defense system may increase energetic costs, thus reducing fish growth and survival. The present study also suggests that oxidative stress biomarkers can be used in fish to detect early responses to nodularin.

  • 81.
    Persson, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Stenroth, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Effects of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nodularia on fitness and feeding behavior of young-of-the-year (YOY) Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis)2011In: Toxicon, ISSN 0041-0101, E-ISSN 1879-3150, Vol. 57, no 7-8, p. 1033-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThis study reveals that both cyanobacterial toxicity and turbidity have the potential to reduce the growth and energy storage of young-of-the-year (YOY) perch and thereby influence survival rates. During the 1990's a reduction in recruitment of YOY perch (Perca fluviatilis) occurred along the Swedish East coast. Concurrently, large blooms of filamentous cyanobacteria have increased in the Baltic Proper and in coastal waters. This study examined whether extended exposure to toxic and non-toxic filamentous cyanobacterium Nodularia affect YOY perch growth and feeding behavior under simulated bloom conditions (30 days at 50 μg Chl a L−1). Specific growth rate (SGR), the somatic condition index (SCI) and the lipid content of YOY perch (10–12 weeks old) were significantly lower in perch exposed to Nodularia compared to fed controls (no Nodularia). YOY perch exposed to non-toxic Nodularia displayed a higher attack rate than perch living in Nodularia free controls in 2 out of 3 trials. Reductions in growth and energy storage, mediated by cyanobacteria, increase the risk of starvation and predation and could locally influence recruitment of YOY perch.

    Highlights► We investigate the effects of toxic and non-toxic cyanobacterial (Nodularia sp.) on young-of-the-year (YOY) perch (Perca fluviatilis). ► Endpoints are specific growth rate (SGR), lipid content and feeding behavior (feeding and attack rate). ► Results show that both non-toxic and toxic Nodularia reduce SGR and lipid content of YOY perch. ► Reduced growth and energy storage may locally influence recruitment of YOY perch. 

  • 82. Rathi, Akshat
    Olofsson, Martin (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    The revolutionary technology pushing Sweden toward the seemingly impossible goal of zero emissions: The cure for emissions: algae2017In: Quartz, no 21 JuneArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 83. Rengefors, K
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Toxicity in Peridinium aciculiferum- an adaptative strategy to outcompete other winter phytoplankton?2001In: Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 46, p. 1990-1997Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84. Rengefors, Karin
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Cell density-dependence of allelopathic activity in Peridinium aciculiferum2007In: Journal of Phycology, Vol. 42, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Roberts, EC
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Steinke, Michael
    Wootton, Emma
    Mechanisms underlying chemical interactions between predatory planktonic protists and their prey2011In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 833-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predatory protists use chemical recognition to increase feeding efficiency by responding to point sources of prey chemoattractants and through adhering to the cell surface of their prey. In response, their prey possess a multitude of chemical- based antipredator strategies. Given that these chemical interactions play a key role in driving aquatic food webs, we emphasize the need for a better knowledge of the associated underlying mechanisms. As the mechanisms underpinning such chemi- cal interactions have been intensively researched for certain non-planktonic model protists, we highlight that studies on these model organisms can help elucidate the mechanisms involved in planktonic predator–prey interactions. A related future challenge will be to interpret the evolutionary and ecological consequences of these chemical interactions within planktonic communities, and here this will be dis- cussed in relation to coevolutionary arms races and costs.

  • 86.
    Rosenlund, Joacim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    The circular economy business model of Algoland2018In: Book of abstracts: Linnaeus ECO-TECH '18, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87. Skovgaard, Alf
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Observation of live specimens of Pseudotontonia cornuta (Ciliophora : Oligotrichida) reveals new distinctive characters2005In: Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, Vol. 85 (4), p. 783-786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 88. Skovgaard, Alf
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hansen, PJ
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Effects of nutrient limitation on food uptake in the toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum.2003In: Aquat. Microb. Ecol., Vol. 31: 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89. Sopanen, S
    et al.
    Koski, M
    Uronen, P
    Kuuppo, P
    Lehtinen, S
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Tamminen, T
    Prymnesium parvum exotoxins affect the grazing and viability of the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis2008In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 361, p. 191-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis from the northern Baltic Sea was exposed to cell-free filtrates of the toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum as well as to cell mixtures of P. parvum and Rhodomonas salina. To test the effects of P. parvum exudates and allelopathy on selective grazers, copepods were incubated (1) in increasing concentrations of cell-free filtrates of P. parvum in the presence of good food (R, salina), (2) in 1:1 cell mixtures at 2 cell concentrations of P. parvum and R. salina and (3) in R. salina cell suspension, which was used as a control for good-quality food. P. parvum cultures were grown in nutrient-balanced (+NP) or limited (-N or -P) media to obtain different levels of toxicity. Survival, ingestion, faecal pellet production rates and egg production were measured over 3 d, together with measurements of P. parvum toxicity (hemolytic activity) (HA). Most of the copepods incubated in high-filtrate concentrations died or became severely impaired, although (HA) in filtrates was under the detection limit. Further, the ingestion and faecal pellet production rates were suppressed in the highest filtrate concentrations in nutrient-limited treatments. Higher cell density in cell mixtures resulted in significantly lower faecal pellet production, although survival remained high. Our results show that HA is not a good overall indicator of the total harmful effects of P. parvum on grazers. Besides monospecific P. parvum diets, filtrates and cell mixtures have negative effects on grazers, and these effects are stronger under nutrient-depleted conditions; however, the presence of good-quality food lowers harmful effects for copepods. The negative effects caused either by direct intoxication or by food limitation following from strong allelopathic effects of P. parvum on other components of nano- and microplankton suggest that P. parvum blooms have a realistic potential to be deleterious for copepod secondary production, irrespective of the presence of alternative food sources.

  • 90. Sopanen, S
    et al.
    Koski, Marja
    Kuuppo, P
    Uronen, P
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Tamminen, T
    Toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum affects grazing, survival, egestion and egg production of the calanoid copepods Eurytemora affinis and Acartia bifilosa2006In: Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser., Vol. 327, p. 223-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Sopanen, Sanna
    et al.
    Univ. Helsinki, Finland.
    Uronen, Pauliina
    Univ. Helsinki, Finalnd.
    Kuuppo, Pirjo
    Finnish Environmental Agency, SYKE.
    Svensen, Camilla
    Univ. Tromso, Fisheries, Norway.
    Rhul, Alex
    Univ. Jena, Germany.
    Tamminen, Timo
    Finnish Environmental Agency, SYKE.
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Transfer of nodularin to copepod Eurytemora affinis through the microbial food web2009In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0948-3055, E-ISSN 1616-1564, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 115-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nodularia spumigena Mertens ex Bornet & Flahault 1886 (Cyanophyceae) frequently forms harmful blooms in the Baltic Sea, and the toxin nodularin has been found in calanoid copepods during the blooms. Although nodularin has been found at higher trophic levels of the food web, no available information exists about the role of the microbial loop in the transfer of nodularin. We followed the transfer of nodularin to the copepod Eurytemora affinis during conditions that resembled initial 'pre-bloom' (Expt 1) and late stationary (Expt 2) phases of a N. spumigena bloom. The experiments were carried out using natural plankton communities spiked with cultured N. spumigena and grown in laboratory mesocosms, and E. affinis, which were isolated from the Baltic Sea and had no prior contact with nodularin. The plankton community was divided into 6 size fractions as follows: <150, <45, <20, <10, <3 and <0.2 pm, in which E. affinis was incubated for 24 h. Ingestion and clearance rates, food selection and faecal pellet production were based on microscopical analyses. Nodularin was measured with HPLC-MS with electrospray ionization in the copepods, as well as in dissolved and particulate fractions before and after incubation. We found that nodularin accumulated in copepods in all the plankton size fractions. The copepods contained nodularin concentrations of 14.3 +/- 11.6 (mean +/- SD) and 6.6 +/- 0.7 pg ind.(-1) after incubation in the < 150 mu m fraction in Expt 1 and Expt 2, respectively, while the range in the smaller size fractions was from 1.3 +/- 2.8 to 5.7 +/- 1.3 pg ind.-1. Nodularin was transferred to the copepods through 3 pathways: (1) by grazing on filaments of small N. spumigena, (2) directly from the dissolved pool, and (3) through the microbial food web by copepods grazing on ciliates, dinoflagellates and heterotrophic nanoflagellates. The relative importance of direct grazing on small N. spumigena filaments varied from moderate to insignificant. The microbial loop was important in nodularin transfer to higher trophic levels. Our results suggest that the importance of the microbial loop in harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin transfer may be underestimated both in marine and freshwater systems. 

  • 92. Strogyloudi, Evangeli
    et al.
    Giannakourou, A
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ruehl, A
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Estimating the accumulation and transfer of Nodularia spumigena toxins by the blue mussel Mytilus edulis: An appraisal from culture and mesocosm experiments2006In: Toxicon, Vol. 48 (4), p. 359-372Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Sun, Xiaole
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Olofsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Andersson, Per S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Fry, Brian
    Griffith Univ, Australia.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Humborg, Christoph
    Stockholm University.
    Morth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Effects of growth and dissolution on the fractionation of silicon isotopes by estuarine diatoms2014In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 130, p. 156-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of silicon (Si) isotope fractionation during diatom growth in open ocean systems have documented lower Si isotopic values (delta Si-30) in the biogenic silica of diatom frustules compared to dissolved silicon. Recent findings also indicate that Si isotope fractionation occurs during dissolution of diatom frustules, producing higher delta Si-30 values in the remaining biogenic silica. This study focuses on diatoms from high production areas in estuarine and coastal areas that represent approximately 30-50% of the global marine primary production. Two species of diatoms, Thalassiosira baltica and Skeletonema marinoi, were isolated from the brackish Baltic Sea, one of the largest estuarine systems in the world. These species were used for laboratory investigations of Si isotope fractionation during diatom growth and the subsequent dissolution of the diatom frustules. Both species of diatoms give an identical Si isotope fractionation factor during growth of -1.50 +/- 0.36 parts per thousand (2 sigma) for Si-30, which falls in the range of -2.09 parts per thousand to -0.55 parts per thousand of published data. Our results also suggest a dissolution-induced Si isotope fractionation factor of -0.86 parts per thousand at early stage of dissolution, but this effect was observed only in DSi and no significant Si isotope change was observed for BSi. The growth and dissolution results are applied to a Baltic Sea sediment core to reconstruct DSi utilization by diatoms, and found to be in agreement with the observed DSi uptake rates in the overlying water column during diatom growth.

  • 94. Svensen, Camilla
    et al.
    Strogyloudi, Evangeli
    Wexels- Riser, Christian
    Dahlmann, Jens
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wassmann, Paul
    Granéli, Edna
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pagou, Kalliopi
    Reduction of cyanobacterial toxins through coprophagy in Mytilus edulis.2005In: Harmful Algae, Vol. 4: pp. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Sörenson, Eva
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bertos-Fortis, Mireia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Farnelid, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kremp, Anke
    Finnish Environment Institute, Finland;Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemunde, Germany.
    Kruget, Karen
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Finnish Environment Institute, Finland.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Consistency in microbiomes in cultures of Alexandrium species isolated from brackish and marine waters2019In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 425-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytoplankton and bacteria interactions have a significant role in aquatic ecosystem functioning. Associations can range from mutualistic to parasitic, shaping biogeochemical cycles and having a direct influence on phytoplankton growth. How variations in phenotype and sampling location, affect the phytoplankton microbiome is largely unknown. A high‐resolution characterization of the bacterial community in cultures of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium was performed on strains isolated from different geographical locations and at varying anthropogenic impact levels. Microbiomes of Baltic Sea Alexandrium ostenfeldii isolates were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and were consistent over phenotypic and genotypic Alexandrium strain variation, resulting in identification of an A. ostenfeldii core microbiome. Comparisons with in situ bacterial communities showed that taxa found in this A. ostenfeldii core were specifically associated to dinoflagellate dynamics in the Baltic Sea. Microbiomes of Alexandrium tamarense and minutum, isolated from the Mediterranean Sea, differed from those of A. ostenfeldii in bacterial diversity and composition but displayed high consistency, and a core set of bacterial taxa was identified. This indicates that Alexandrium isolates with diverse phenotypes host predictable, species‐specific, core microbiomes reflecting the abiotic conditions from which they were isolated. These findings enable in‐depth studies of potential interactions occurring between Alexandrium and specific bacterial taxa.

  • 96.
    Theulen, Jan
    et al.
    r Global Environmental Sustainability, HeidelbergCement Group, Germany .
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Harvesting CO2 from cement kiln flue gas using micro-algae: valuable biomass production in Sweden2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97. Thorén, AK
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Herrmann, Jan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Transport and transformation of de-icing urea from airport runways in a constructed wetland system2003In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Water Science and Technology, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 283-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urea, NH2-CO-NH2, is used as a de-icing agent at Kalmar Airport, southeast Sweden. During 1998-2001, urea contributed on average 30% of the yearly nitrogen (N) transport of 41,000 kg via Tornebybacken stream to the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. In order to reduce stream transport of N from airport, agricultural and other diffuse sources, a wetland was constructed in 1996. Annual wetland retention of total-N varied in the range of 2,500-8,1100 kg (6-36% of influent) during 1998-2001, according to mass balances calculated from monthly sampling. During airport de-icing, January-March 2001, 660 kg urea-N out of 2,600 kg applied urea-N reached the wetland according to daily sampling. This indicated that 75% of the urea was transformed before entering the wetland. Urea was found to be only a minor part (8%) of total-N in the wetland influent. Calculations of cumulative urea-N loads at the wetland inlet and outlet respectively, showed a significant urea. transformation during February 2001 with approximately 40% of the incoming urea-N being transformed in the wetland system. These results show that significant amounts of urea can be transformed in a wetland system at air temperatures around 0degreesC. 

  • 98. Thorén, AK
    et al.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Tonderski, K
    Temporal export of nitrogen from a constructed wetland: influence of hydrology and senescing submerged plants2004In: Ecological Engineering, Vol. 23, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99. Uronen, P
    et al.
    Kuuppo, P
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Tamminen, T
    Allelopathic activity of toxic Prymnesium parvum leads to release of dissolved organic carbon and increase in bacterial biomass2007In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 100. Uronen, P
    et al.
    Lehtinen, S
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Kuuppo, P
    Tamminen, T
    Haemolytic activity and allelopathy of the haptophyte Prymnesium parvum in nutrient-limited and balanced growth conditions2005In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 299, p. 137-148Article in journal (Refereed)
123 51 - 100 of 107
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