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  • 51.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Mångtydighetens tydlighet2004In: Bilden som arkeologisk källa / [ed] Milstreu, Gerhard & Prøhl, Henning, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2004, p. 121-135-205-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    North European rock art: A long-term perspective2019In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art / [ed] Bruno David, Ian J. McNiven, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 51-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter offers a long-term perspective on rock art in northern Europe. It first provides an overview of research on the rock art traditions of northern Europe before discussing the societies and cultures that created such traditions. It then considers examples of rock art made by hunter-gatherer societies in northern Europe, focusing on the first rock art boom related to Neolithization. It also examines the second rock art boom, which was associated with social and religious changes within farming communities that took place around 1600–1400 bc. The chapter concludes by analysing the breakdown of long-distance networks in the transition from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age and its consequences for the making of rock art within the southern traditions, as well as the use of rock art sites during the Pre-Roman Iron Age, Roman Iron Age, and Migration Period.

  • 53.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Ny bok om svensk arkeologis första världskändis: Evert Baudou, Oscar Montelius – om tidens återkomst och kulturens vandringar. Stockholm: Atlantis Förlag 2012. 416 sidor. ISBN 978 9 173535 3972012In: HumaNetten, ISSN 1403-2279, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 50-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Om döda och efterlevande med exempel från Bredrör, Skelhøj, Sagaholm och Mjeltehaugen2006In: Samfunn, symboler og identitet – Festskrift til Gro Mandt på 70-årsdagen / [ed] Barndon, R., Innselset, S. M., Kristoffersen, K. K. & Lødøen, T. K, Bergen: Bergens universitet , 2006, p. 283-303Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Om krigens minnen och att minnas krig - Hvidegårdsgraven revisited #22009Book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    On unfolding present and past (rock art) worldings2019In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is set out to unfold present and past (rock art) ontologies or 'worldings'. It aims to present different modes of identifications, and the often intricate relationships between humans and other-than-humans from a relational perspective, with the hope of challenging our western perception of the world. It presents some thoughts on how different ontologies are unfolded through artworks and material culture, and how these worldings differ from one another.

  • 57.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    On war and the memory of war:: the Middle Bronze Age burial from Hvidegarden on Zealand in Denmark revisited2012In: N-TAG TEN. Proceedings from 10th Nordic-Tag conference at Stiklestad, Norway 2009 / [ed] Berge, Ragnhild, Jasinsko, Marek E & Sognnes, Kalle, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2012, p. 237-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses various memory practices and how they may have been manifested in a particular context, the famous burial from Hvidegård on Zealand in Denmark. The theoretical perspective is inspired by Jan Assmann’s thoughts about cultural memory. Assmann suggests that our memory comes in various forms, which are presented and analyzed here in relation to the Hvidegård burial. The article contains a new analysis of the content of the fascinating belt-purse from Hvidegård and an analysis of the cremated bones from this burial. A conclusion from these analyses could be that different kinds of memory practice are always interwoven. This might create both problems and opportunities for an interpretative archaeology.

  • 58.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Oscar Montelius – on the return of time and the drift of culture.: Review of Evert Baudou, Oscar Montelius – om tidens återkomst och kulturens vandringar. Stockholm: Atlantis Förlag 2012. 416 sidor. ISBN 978 9 173535 397.2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 205-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Oskarshamn före Oskarshamn: Från islossning till reformation2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Boken ger en kulturhistorisk överblick över Oskarshamnstrakten från stenålder till reformation.

  • 60.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Lund University.
    Recension av Burenhult, G. (red.), Ajvide och den moderna arkeologin. Natur och Kultur. Falköping 1997.2001In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 119-123Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Recension av Hjalmar Olsson, Kinky Rockcarvings in Sweden. Ord & vision. Solna. 2008. 59s. ISBN 978-91-633-1995-22010In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 240-240Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Recension: Shadows of a northern past av John Coles.2005In: Adoranten, p. 118-121Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Recension: Chippindale, Ch. & Taçon, P. ed. 1998. The archaeology of Rock Art. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge2001In: Adoranten, ISSN 0349-8808, Vol. 2000, p. 85-87Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Reflektioner kring den arkeologiska grund- och forskarutbildningen i Sverige.2004In: Arkeologen, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 4-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rethinking Bronze Age Cosmology: a North European perspective2013In: The Oxford handbook of the European Bronze Age / [ed] Fokkens, Harry & Harding, Anthony, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 248-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of Blaze O'Connor, Gabriel Cooney and John Chapman, eds, (Prehistoric Society Research Paper 3, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2009, 191pp., 93 b/w illustr., 8 colour plates, hbk, ISBN 978-1-84217-377-0)2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 251-253Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of Robert ben Gunn: Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia. Oxford: Archaeopress2019In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 370, article id 1393-1395Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Roaring rocks – an audio-visual perspective on hunther-gatherer engravings in Northern Sweden and Scandinavia2002In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 29-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Roaring rocks: an audio-visual perspective on hunter-gatherer engravings in Northern Sweden and Scandinavia2018In: Narratives and journeys in rock art: a reader / [ed] George Nash, Aron Masel, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018, p. 375-407Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article attempts to extend the study of rock-art beyond the visual to include the non-visual experiences and perceptions of human beings. It is argued that there is ‘more than meets the eye’ when interpreting rock-art. Rather than restricting interpretation to the visual, the relationship between rock ‘art’, rock-art ‘site’ and the wider landscape is considered as articulated within a socially and historically specific Neolithic (ca. 4000–500 BC) hunter-gatherer ‘mindscape’. An audio-visual perspective is argued, where the auditory sense and visual experience of the landscape combine in a vital interplay that is essential to the interpretation of 25 out of about 80 known rock-engraving sites in northern Scandinavia (ca. 33%). These sites have in common a strong water-centric focus; in particular noisy, running water. This approach provides a more profound understanding of these rock-art sites and the prehistoric use of ‘images’ as transmitters of different kinds of knowledge from the mundane to the esoteric. It is argued that the ebb and flow of water and human breath are analogous within a frame of enquiry that also considers shamanistic practice in approaching and experiencing these rock-engraving sites. 

  • 70.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Rock art and the materialisation of a cosmology1999In: Rock art as social representation / [ed] Goldhahn Joakim, Oxford: Archaeopress , 1999, p. 76-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Rock art as microscapes1999In: Marxistiska perspektiv inom skandinavisk arkeologi / [ed] Goldhahn, Joakim & Nordquist Pär, Umeå: Umeås universitet , 1999, p. 85-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Rock art as social representation1999Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Rock art as social representation: introduction1999In: Rock art as social representation / [ed] Goldhahn, Joakim, Oxford: Archaeopress , 1999, p. 5-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Rock art for the dead and un-dead: Reflections on the significance of hand stones in Late Bronze Age Scandinavia2010In: Adoranten: aarsskrift foer scandinavian society for prehistoric art, ISSN 0349-8808, Vol. 2009, p. 95-103Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Rock art studies in northernmost Europe, 2000-20042008In: Rock art Studies News of the World III / [ed] Bahn, Paul G., Franklin, Natalie & Strecker, Matthias, Oxford: Oxbow Books , 2008, p. 16-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rock art worldings2019In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 165-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Studia Archaeologica Universitatis Umensis 11. Umeå.
    Sagaholm – hällristningar och gravritual1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Sagaholm ett betvingat kaos1999In: Populär arkeologi, no 1, p. 19-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Sagaholm: North European bronze age rock art and burial ritual2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This monograph presents and discuss a rock art find in the form of engravings from a Bronze Age barrow in Ljungarum parish, Jönköping Län, situated in the central part of southern Sweden. The site, Sagaholm, contains the largest group of finds of rock engravings in a burial context in northern Europe. The main purpose is to present some aspects of the use of rock engravings in burial rituals during the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1500–1100 cal BC). The antiquarian and scientific history of this extraordinary find are discussed. In order to understand the meaning and significance of the rock art in the barrow, the author presents a theoretical argument that the rock art is meaningfully composed and can been seen as a result of an active symbolic praxis which mirrors a metaphorical way of thinking. Special concern is given to the frequent horse motifs at Sagaholm and it is argued that they,

    and the morphology of this particular barrow, can be seen as a metaphor for a new and exotic cosmology that reached southern Scandinavia during the Middle Bronze Age. The author further suggests that this extraordinary find points to a re/interpretation of Scandinavian Bronze Age rock art as an important part of the burial ritual, which is linked to certain beliefs about the regeneration of life. 

  • 80.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Showen rullar på så länge Bredarör på Kivik består2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Six periodic encounters with Kristian Kristiansen2013In: Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen / [ed] Bergerbrant, Sophie and Sabatini, Serena, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2013, p. 7-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents six personal encounters with Kristian Kristiansen from the early 1990s until today. The encounters stretch from the dawn of time when I was a young student throughout my career as an archaeologist involved in rock art and Bronze Age research in Northern Europe. I also present some thoughts about the inimitable personal qualities that make Kristian such an influential archaeologist, colleague and friend. 

  • 82.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Skeppet som grav, kenotaf och geoglyf:  några tankar om bronsålderns skeppsformade stensättningar och deras betydelse2011In: Forntid längs ostkusten 2: Baknkaholmsseminariet det tredje året, 2010 / [ed] Alexandersson Kenneth, Dahlin Michael, Palm Veronica, Papmehl-Dufay Ludvig & Wikell, Roger, Västervik: Västerviks Museum , 2011, p. 220-263Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Slagsta revisited – en essä om behovet av subjektivt tolkande dokument2005In: Mellan sten och järn – rapport från det 9:e nordiska bronsålderssymposiet, Göteborg 2003-10-09/12 / [ed] Goldhahn, Joakim, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2005, p. 581-598Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Smeden som kosmolog och kosmograf.2009In: Håndverk og produktion. Et møte mellom ulike perspektiver / [ed] Lund, Julie & Lene Melheim, Lene, Oslo: Oslo University , 2009, , p. 163-196p. 163-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Special issue on Rock Art Worldings Part I: Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness and Culture2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Special issue on Rock art Worldings Part II: Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness and Culture2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Sveriges äldsta och norra Europas näst äldsta hällbildsdokumentationer – en notis om Johannis Haquini Rhezelius antikvariska resa till Öland och Småland 16342011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents some of the earliest rock art

    documentation known from northern Europe.

    Johannes Haquini Rhezelius produced it on an

    antiquarian journey to Öland and Småland in

    1634. Compared with the Norwegian Peder Alfsøn’s

    documentation from seven years previously

    in northern Bohuslän, then a part of Norway,

    there are differences and similarities. Both men

    drew by eye with ink, Alfsøn then embellishing

    his images with watercolours. Neither used any

    scalemeasurements.

    Rhezelius's informants did not seem to preserve

    any pre-Christian ideas about figurative

    rock art. They associated it with legends and stories

    sprung fromaChristian culture;with giants,

    maidens and church-burglars. Folklore associated

    cupmarks with elfs.

  • 88.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Synopsis gällande bronsålderskustens hällbilder2012In: Bronsålderskust: Förstudie 2011-2012,  Västerviks kommun, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum , 2012, , p. 23p. 1-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The key chain of archaeology is not stronger than its weakest link2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 2010, no 18, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The wings of Skedemosse: Traces of bird divinations2019In: Tidens landskap: en vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 108-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    To let mute stones speak – on the becoming of archaeology2018In: Giving the Past a Future: Essays in Archaeology and Rock Art Studies in Honour of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu / [ed] James Dodd, Ellen Meijer, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018, p. 37-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents some thoughts on the emergence of the archaeological science in the 18th century. My starting point is the debate that occurred in the wake of the discovery of rock art in the famous Bronze Age cairn Bredarör on Kivik in Scania, southern Sweden. Here we find one of the first documented attempts to formulate an archaeological method based on the study of prehistory without explicit support from historical sources – a brave attempt ‘to let mute stones speak’. The authors of this attempt, Anders Forssenius and Sven Lagerbring, introduced an innovative comparative dating method and a novel use of distribution maps. Either way, this bold attempt to formulate a free-standing archaeological method for the study of prehistory did not attain any direct followers, and it was several decades before these methods were revisited again.

  • 92.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Tomma bronsåldersskepp?2009In: Populär Arkeologi, no 4, p. 12-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Törnsfall 107 – hällbilder vid ett röse och ett röse med hällbilder2011Book (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Vandringsmannen Oskar Brusell2006Book (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Vetenskapliga paradigm och arkeologi. Något om den arkeologiska vetenskapens natur1994In: Kontaktstencil, ISSN 0345-6498, Vol. 37, p. 37-51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    We paint and we are proud of it2005In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 55-60-64-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Älvornas arkeologi2018In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 113, no 4, p. 210-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rock art research in Northern Europe has found few opportunities to highlight the creation and use of rock art through informed methods. Most rock art traditions seem to have ended thousands of years before any historical sources inform us about people's life-worlds. The exception to this is ample post-Reformation sources that connect cup marks with elves: light fairy creatures who were easily disturbed and could cause sickness and ill fortune if they became annoyed. This paper highlights this body of belief through historical and oral sources and through archaeological evidence. I argue that Early Modern elf folklore may very well be based in older traditions which found new expressions through the Reformation and the Danish and Swedish state religion - Protestantism.

  • 98.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Alexandersson, Kenneth
    Dahlin, Michael
    Ett greptungesvärd från bronsålderns period IV2009Report (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Broström, Sven-Gunnar
    Ihrestam, Kenneth
    En nyfunnen hällbildslokal vid Sjöstorp gårds, Ödeshög socken i Östergötland.2005Report (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Broström, Sven-Gunnar
    Ihrestam, Kenneth
    Wikell, Roger
    Nyfynd av hällristningar i Halland: Rapport från inventering av hällristningar i Halland tre dagar i maj 20112011Report (Other academic)
123 51 - 100 of 126
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