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  • 51. Hagströmer, Maria
    et al.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Sjöström, Michael
    The International Prevalence Study; Health Enhancing Physical Activity in Sweden.2006In: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle.
    Grooten, Wim
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    A holistic approach in measuring occupational physical activity: challenges and potentials2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Håkansson, Krister
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet ; Stockholm University.
    Ledreux, Aurelie
    Karolinska Institutet ; Medical University of South Carolina, USA.
    Daffner, Kirk
    Harvard Medical School, USA.
    Terjestam, Yvonne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Carlsson, Roger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Granholm, Ann-Charlotte
    Medical University of South Carolina, USA.
    Mohammed, Abdul K. H.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    BDNF Responses in Healthy Older Persons to 35 Minutes of Physical Exercise, Cognitive Training, and Mindfulness: Associations with Working Memory Function2017In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 645-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a central role in brain plasticity by mediating changes in cortical thickness and synaptic density in response to physical activity and environmental enrichment. Previous studies suggest that physical exercise can augment BDNF levels, both in serum and the brain, but no other study has examined how different types of activities compare with physical exercise in their ability to affect BDNF levels. By using a balanced cross over experimental design, we exposed nineteen healthy older adults to 35-minute sessions of physical exercise, cognitive training, and mindfulness practice, and compared the resulting changes in mature BDNF levels between the three activities. We show that a single bout of physical exercise has significantly larger impact on serum BDNF levels than either cognitive training or mindfulness practice in the same persons. This is the first study on immediate BDNF effects of physical activity in older healthy humans and also the first study to demonstrate an association between serum BDNF responsivity to acute physical exercise and working memory function. We conclude that the BDNF increase we found after physical exercise more probably has a peripheral than a central origin, but that the association between post-intervention BDNF levels and cognitive function could have implications for BDNF responsivity in serum as a potential marker of cognitive health.

  • 54.
    Jiménez-Pavón, David
    et al.
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Research Centre National Institute for Health Development, Estonia.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Research & Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Siani, Alfonso
    National Research Council, Italy.
    Iacoviello, Licia
    Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Molnár, Dénes
    University of Pécs, Hungary.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Gent University, Belgium.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Moreno, Luis A
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Physical activity and clustered cardiovascular disease risk factors in young children: a cross-sectional study (the IDEFICS study)2013In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 11, article id 172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The relevance of physical activity (PA) for combating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in children has been highlighted, but to date there has been no large-scale study analyzing that association in children aged ≤9 years of age. This study sought to evaluate the associations between objectively-measured PA and clustered CVD risk factors in a large sample of European children, and to provide evidence for gender-specific recommendations of PA.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional data from a longitudinal study in 16,224 children aged 2 to 9 were collected. Of these, 3,120 (1,016 between 2 to 6 years, 2,104 between 6 to 9 years) had sufficient data for inclusion in the current analyses. Two different age-specific and gender-specific clustered CVD risk scores associated with PA were determined. First, a CVD risk factor (CRF) continuous score was computed using the following variables: systolic blood pressure (SBP), total triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) ratio, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and sum of two skinfolds (score CRFs). Secondly, another CVD risk score was obtained for older children containing the score CRFs + the cardiorespiratory fitness variable (termed score CRFs + fit). Data used in the current analysis were derived from the IDEFICS ('Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS') study.

    RESULTS: In boys <6 years, the odds ratios (OR) for CVD risk were elevated in the least active quintile of PA (OR: 2.58) compared with the most active quintile as well as the second quintile for vigorous PA (OR: 2.91). Compared with the most active quintile, older children in the first, second and third quintiles had OR for CVD risk score CRFs + fit ranging from OR 2.69 to 5.40 in boys, and from OR 2.85 to 7.05 in girls.

    CONCLUSIONS: PA is important to protect against clustering of CVD risk factors in young children, being more consistent in those older than 6 years. Healthcare professionals should recommend around 60 and 85 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous PA, including 20 min/day of vigorous PA.Please see related commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/173.

  • 55.
    Jönsson, Thérése
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital;Lund University;BOA Registry, Centre of Registries, Västra Götaland.
    Ekvall Hansson, Eva
    Lund University.
    Thorstensson, Carina A
    University of Gothenburg.
    Eek, Frida
    Lund University.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Dahlberg, Leif E
    Skåne University Hospital;Lund University.
    The effect of education and supervised exercise on physical activity, pain, quality of life and self-efficacy - an intervention study with a reference group.2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) are less physically active than people in general, and many of these individuals have adopted a sedentary lifestyle. In this study we evaluate the outcome of education and supervised exercise on the level of physical activity in individuals with knee or hip OA. We also evaluate the effect on pain, quality of life and self-efficacy.

    METHODS: Of the 264 included individuals with knee or hip OA, 195 were allocated to the intervention group. The intervention group received education and supervised exercise that comprised information delivered by a physiotherapist and individually adapted exercises. The reference group consisted of 69 individuals with knee or hip OA awaiting joint replacement and receiving standard care. The primary outcome was physical activity (as measured with an accelerometer). The secondary outcomes were pain (Visual Analog Scale), quality of life (EQ-5D), and self-efficacy (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, pain and other symptoms subscales). Participants in both groups were evaluated at baseline and after 3 months. The intervention group was also evaluated after 12 months.

    RESULTS: No differences were found in the number of minutes spent in sedentary or in physical activity between the intervention and reference groups when comparing the baseline and 3 month follow-up. However, there was a significant difference in mean change (mean diff; 95% CI; significance) between the intervention group and reference group favoring the intervention group with regard to pain (13; 7 to 19; p < 0.001), quality of life (- 0.17; - 0.24 to - 0.10; p < 0.001), self-efficacy/other symptoms (- 5; - 10 to - 0.3; p < 0.04), and self-efficacy/pain (- 7; - 13 to - 2; p < 0.01). Improvements in pain and quality of life in the intervention group persisted at the 12-month follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: Participation in an education and exercise program following the Swedish BOA program neither decreased the average amount of sedentary time nor increased the level of physical activity. However, participation in such a program resulted in decreased pain, increased quality of life, and increased self-efficacy.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. Registration number: NCT02022566 . Retrospectively registered 12/18/2013.

  • 56.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kremers, Stef P J
    Department of Health Promotion and Health Education, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rizzo, Nico S
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Associations between physical activity, fitness, and academic achievement.2009In: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 155, no 6, p. 914-918.e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the associations between objectively assessed intensity levels of physical activity and academic achievement and test whether cardiovascular fitness mediates the association between physical activity and academic achievement.

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional data were gathered in Swedish 9th-grade students (n = 232; mean age = 16 years; 52% girls). School grades, pubertal phase, skinfold thickness, cardiovascular fitness, and physical activity were measured objectively. Mother's education, family structure, and parental monitoring were self-reported. Data were analyzed with linear regression analyses.

    RESULTS: After controlling for confounding factors, academic achievement was associated with vigorous physical activity in girls (beta = .30, P < .01; explained variance of the model 26%), which remained after inclusion of fitness (beta = .23, P < .05; explained variance 29%). The association was not mediated by fitness. In boys, academic achievement was associated with pubertal phase (beta = .25, P < .05). After inclusion of fitness, it was only associated with fitness (beta = .25, P < .05; explained variance of the model 30%).

    CONCLUSION: In girls, academic achievement was associated with vigorous physical activity and not mediated by fitness, whereas in boys only fitness was associated with academic achievement. Further studies are necessary to investigate the potential longitudinal effect of vigorous physical activity on academic achievement, the role of fitness herein and the implications of these findings for schools.

  • 57. Meusel, Dirk
    et al.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Ortega, Francisco B
    Sjöström, Michael
    Efficient and comprehensive analysis of accelerometer data to measure physical activity in large populations – the ALPHA project.2007In: 15th European Congress on Obesity, Budapest, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58. Meusel, Dirk
    et al.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Ortega, Francisco B
    Sjöström, Michael
    ALPHA - Instruments for Assessing Levels of Physical Activity and Fitness2007In: Ernährung, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 360-265Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59. Meusel, Dirk
    et al.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Ortega, Francisco B
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Sjöström, Michael
    Assessing Levels of Physical Activity in the European Population - the ALPHA project2007In: Selección, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 9-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 60. Nordgren, Birgitta
    et al.
    Bergman, Patrick
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Opava, Christina H.
    Fridén, Cecilia
    Study group, PARA
    Physical activity, body functions, activity and general health perception in rheumatoid arthritis2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61. Ortega, Francisco B
    et al.
    Artero, Enrique G
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Vicente-Rodriguez, German
    Bergman, Patrick
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Ottevaere, Carine
    Nagy, Ester
    Konsta, Ors
    Rey, Pablo
    Polito, Angela
    Dietrich, Sabine
    Plada, Maria
    Beghin, Laurent
    Manios, Yannis
    Sjöström, Michael
    Castillo, Manuel J
    Reliability of health-related physical fitness tests in European adolescents. The HELENA study.2008In: Int J Obes (Lond), Vol. 32, p. S49-S57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62. Ortega, Francisco B
    et al.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Artero, Enrique G
    Vicente-Rodriguez, Germán
    Bergman, Patrick
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Ottevaere, Charlene
    Nagy, Enikő
    Konsta, Or
    Rey, Pablo
    Polito, Angela
    Dietrich, Sabine
    Plada, Maria
    Beghin, Laurent
    Manios, Yannis
    Ciarapica, Donatella
    Sjöström, Michael
    Castillo, Manuel J
    Health-related physical fitness assessment in adolescents: a reliability approach. The HELENA study2008In: International Conference on Physical Activity and Health, Amsterdam, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63. Patterson, Emma
    et al.
    McGeough, Dara
    Cannon, Eamer
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Kearney, John
    Sjöström, Michael
    Self-efficacy, stages of change and physical activity in Irish college students2006In: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64. Sallis, James F
    et al.
    Bowles, Heather R
    Bauman, Adrian
    Ainsworth, Barbara E
    Bull, Fiona C
    Craig, Cora L
    Sjöström, Michael
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Lefevre, Johan
    Matsudo, Victor
    Matsudo, Sandra
    Macfarlane, Duncan J
    Gomez, Luis F
    Inoue, Shigeru
    Murase, Norio
    Volbekiene, Vida
    McLean, Grant
    Carr, Harriette
    Heggebo, Lena K
    Tomten, Heidi
    Bergman, Patrick
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Neighborhood environments are related to physical activity among adults in 11 countries2009In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0749-3797, E-ISSN 1873-2607, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 484-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Understanding environmental correlates of physical activity can inform policy changes. Surveys were conducted in 11 countries using the same self-report environmental variables and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, allowing analyses with pooled data.

    Methods

    The participating countries were Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, China (Hong Kong), Japan, Lithuania, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and the U.S., with a combined sample of 11,541 adults living in cities. Samples were reasonably representative, and seasons of data collection were comparable. Participants indicated whether seven environmental attributes were present in their neighborhood. Outcomes were measures of whether health-related guidelines for physical activity were met. Data were collected in 2002–2003 and analyzed in 2007. Logistic regression analyses evaluated associations of physical activity with environmental attributes, adjusted for age, gender, and clustering within country.

    Results

    Five of seven environmental variables were significantly related to meeting physical activity guidelines, ranging from access to low-cost recreation facilities (OR=1.16) to sidewalks on most streets (OR=1.47). A graded association was observed, with the most activity–supportive neighborhoods having 100% higher rates of sufficient physical activity compared to those with no supportive attributes.

    Conclusions

    Results suggest neighborhoods built to support physical activity have a strong potential to contribute to increased physical activity. Designing neighborhoods to support physical activity can now be defined as an international public health issue.

  • 65. Sjöstrom, Michael
    et al.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Oja, Pekka
    Monitoring health enhancing physical activity across Europe2005In: The annual EUPHA conference, Workshop presentation, Graz, Austria, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66. Sjöstrom, Michael
    et al.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Patterson, Emma
    Oja, Pekka
    Physical Activity monitoring at population level in Europe2005In: The 18th International Congress of Nutrition, Durban: The Official South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67. Sjöström, Michael
    et al.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Hurtig-Wennlof, Anita
    Oja, Pekka
    Ortega, Francisco B
    Meusel, Dirk
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Patterson, Emma
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Rizzo, Nico
    Ruiz, Jonatan R
    Wärnberg, Julia
    The European Youth Heart Study (EYHS)2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68. Sjöström, Michael
    et al.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Oja, Pekka
    Assessment of Levels of Physical Activity; Improvement of existing instruments – The ALPHA project2008In: International Conference on Physical Activity and Health, Amsterdam, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69. Sjöström, Michael
    et al.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Bergman, Patrick
    Patterson, Emma
    Oja, Pekka
    Smith, Ben
    Bauman, Adrian
    Monitoring of physical activity at population level; Methods and limitations2005In: the 18th International congress in nutrition, Durban: The official South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Vanhelst, Jérémy
    et al.
    University Lille 2, France ; Toulouse University Hospital, France.
    Béghin, Laurent
    University Lille 2, France ; Toulouse University Hospital, France.
    Duhamel, Alain
    University of Lille Nord de France, France.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Gottrand, Frédéric
    University Lille 2, France.
    Comparison of uniaxial and triaxial accelerometry in the assessment of physical activity among adolescents under free-living conditions: the HELENA study2012In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 12, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different types of devices are available and the choice about which to use depends on various factors: cost, physical characteristics, performance, and the validity and intra- and interinstrument reliability. Given the large number of studies that have used uniaxial or triaxial devices, it is of interest to know whether the different devices give similar information about PA levels and patterns. The aim of this study was to compare physical activity (PA) levels and patterns obtained simultaneously by triaxial accelerometry and uniaxial accelerometry in adolescents in free-living conditions.

    METHODS: Sixty-two participants, aged 13-16 years, were recruited in this ancillary study, which is a part of the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA). All participants wore a uniaxial accelerometer (ActiGraph GT1M®, Pensacola, FL) and a triaxial accelerometer (RT3®, Stayhealthy, Monrovia, CA) simultaneously for 7 days. The patterns were calculated by converting accelerometer data output as a percentage of time spent at sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous PA per day. Analysis of output data from the two accelerometers were assessed by two different tests: Equivalence Test and Bland & Altman method.

    RESULTS: The concordance correlation coefficient between the data from the triaxial accelerometer and uniaxial accelerometer at each intensity level was superior to 0.95. The ANOVA test showed a significant difference for the first three lower intensities while no significant difference was found for vigorous intensity. The difference between data obtained with the triaxial accelerometer and the uniaxial monitor never exceeded 2.1% and decreased as PA level increased. The Bland & Altman method showed good agreement between data obtained between the both accelerometers (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Uniaxial and triaxial accelerometers do not differ in their measurement of PA in population studies, and either could be used in such studies.

  • 71. Vicente-Rodriguez, G.
    et al.
    Rey-Lopez, J. P.
    Ruiz, J. R.
    Jimenez-Pavon, D.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ciarapica, D.
    Heredia, J. M.
    Molnar, D.
    Gutierrez, A.
    Moreno, L. A.
    Ortega, F. B.
    Interrater reliability and time measurement validity of speed-agility field tests in adolescents2011In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2059-2063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the interrater reliability (trained vs. untrained raters) and criterion-related validity (manual vs. automatic timing) of the 4 x 10-m shuttle run and 30-m running speed tests (times measured). The study comprised 85 adolescents (38 girls) aged 13.0-16.9 years from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study. The time required to complete the 4 x 10-m shuttle run and 30-m running tests was simultaneously measured (a) manually with a stopwatch by both trained and untrained raters (for interrater reliability analysis), and (b) by using photoelectric cells (for validity analysis). Systematic error, random error, and heteroscedasticity were studied with repeated-measured analysis of variance and Bland-Altman plots. The systematic error for untrained vs. trained raters and the untrained raters vs. photoelectric cells were in all cases approximately 0.1 seconds (p < 0.01), that is, untrained raters recorded higher times. No systematic error was found between trained raters and photoelectric cells (p > 0.05). No heteroscedasticity was shown in any case (p > 0.05). The findings indicate that manual measurements by a trained rater, using a stopwatch, seem to be a valid method to assess speed and agility fitness testing in adolescents. Researchers must be trained to minimize the measurement error.

  • 72.
    Weimann, Hanna
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Björk, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rylander, Lars
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Neighborhood environment and physical activity among young children: A cross-sectional study from Sweden.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 283-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between the neighbourhood environment and physical activity among young children in a Scandinavian setting, and to assess the influences of seasonal variations, age, sex and parental education.

    METHODS: Physical activity was assessed with an accelerometer and neighbourhood resources were estimated using geographic information systems for 205 Swedish children aged 4-11 years. Neighbourhood resources were generated as the sum of three neighbourhood attributes: (a) foot and bike paths, (b) non-restricted destinations and (c) recreational area, all within 300 m of each child's home. Physical activity was assessed as: (a) total volume of physical activity (i.e. counts per minute), (b) sedentary time and (c) moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The association between neighbourhood resources and physical activity was analysed using mixed linear models weighted by measurement time and adjusted for sex, age, season of activity measurement, type of housing and parental education.

    RESULTS: Children were more physically active in areas with intermediate access to neighbourhood resources for physical activity compared to areas with worst access, while the difference between intermediate and best neighbourhood resource areas was less clear. The association between physical activity and neighbourhood resources was weaker than with seasonal variations but compatible in magnitude with sex, age, type of housing and parental education. Among specific neighbourhood attributes, the amount of foot and bike paths was associated with less sedentary time and more MVPA.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study provides some, not entirely consistent, evidence overall for an association between the neighbourhood environment and physical activity among young children in Scandinavia.

  • 73. Wolfram, Nicole
    et al.
    Rigby, Michael
    Frazzica, Rosa Guiseppa
    Kirch, Willhelm
    Bergman, Patrick
    Sjöström, Michael
    Di Mattia, Pasquale
    Häger, Cristiane
    Neumann, Grit
    Klein, Doreen
    Physical activity and nutrition-health information activities of the EU, WHO, European networks and national examples2007In: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, p. S3-S53Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Many Health Information Activities related to nutrition and physical activity have been initiated during the past years by several institutions on the national and international level as well as by several European networks. A multitude of projects with different scopes and methodologies has arisen. This variety makes it necessary to bring the results of these activities into a coordinated framework. The report aims to give a structured overview on the availability of routine repeated or repeatable data on the health determinants nutrition and physical activity in European countries. An Inventory of Health Information Activities on physical activity and nutrition was built up, which summarises activities carried out by the European Commission, the WHO, various European Networks, as well as national examples. The Health Information Activities collected as national examples assess data for all countries belonging to the European Union up to 2006, the European Economic Area (EEA) and all Candidate countries. The Inventory considers activities which started in 1990 or later, which were still running or have been approved but not yet started.

    Method

    The report analyses institutional structures (WHO, European Commission, European Networks) as well as examples of health information activities at the national level. A network of European public health professionals identified available national health information activities and survey data, which were summarised in a structured online database.

    Results

    The results section presents activities in the field of health information on physical activity and nutrition of the European Commission (DG Sanco), the World Health Organisation (Europe) and various European networks. Furthermore, this section presents the analysis of the database which summarises health information activities in European countries. The database is freely accessible at the website of the Working Party. Additionally, the supplement provides a summary of Health Information Activities for each country in Country Profile Sheets.

    Conclusion

    The report provides a general overview on Health Information Activities related to physical activity and nutrition as well as a state-of-the-art investigation about available data in European countries. The concluding section of the report aims to recommend future Health Information actions which outline open issues.

  • 74.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Demmelmeier, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nordgren, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Opava H, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sedentary time among adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The PARA 2010 study2013In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 72, no Suppl 3, p. 766-Article in journal (Other academic)
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