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  • 51.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Research and Practice Agenda of Industrial e-Maintenance: Information Logistics as a Driver for Development2010In: Proceedings of the 1st International Congress on eMaintenance / [ed] Uday Kumar; Ramin Karim; Aditya Parida, Luleå, 2010, p. 56-61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an inquiry into the domain of e-maintenance, particularly of industrial entities. As a domain of research and practice, e-maintenance is understood to offer great opportunities, however it seems to be driven by the development of applications of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). This ICT-driven approach is unfortunate, as ICT has no value in itself, rather its benefit comes for how it processes information, and more broadly how it forms its contextual activities. To remedy this situation, a conceptual framework is proposed, to guide both the practice and the research of e-maintenance operations. This framework combines the seminal Industrial Value Chain framework and then the Buyer-Consumer Value Chain, and articulates their intersection with a set of defined categories derived from Information Logistics. This provides one possible structure for the conception of e-maintenance, which needs to be populated with the published research and practice results. This, in turn, may uncover white spaces where research efforts deserve particular attention and are driven by value generation – whether economic or other – instead of experimental ICT application developments. The presentation of this framework is accompanied with a brief example that contrasts an event-driven versus a plan-driven approach to e-maintenance.

  • 52.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Hellgren, Magnus
    Centre for Information Logistics, Ljungby, Sweden.
    Rosvall, Jan
    Chalmers University of Technology & University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    An Information Logistics Research Program2010In: Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation, Reading Academic Publishing Limited , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our human and social affairs operate inherently various modes of information sharing; in this we frequently encounter instances where the needed information is not provided to the needing actor, at the right time and cost, and in the right format. To this end, an Information Logistics Research Program has been formulated, grounded both in current research findings and in the actual needs and opportunities of organizations and individuals. The aim of the program is to guide a long term and comprehensive research efforts by indicating the key research domains to be addressed. The formulated research program proposes the following four key research frontiers for Information Logistics: the Information Logistics Operational Models, the Information Logistics Business Models, the Information Needing Actor, and the Information Logistics Foundations. The proposed Research Program also provides suggestions for how to research the defined frontiers.

  • 53.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Koczkas, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Two limitations of the Systemic Conception of a Business Model2015In: Proceedings of the Business Systems Laboratory 3rd International Symposium “Advances in Business Management. Towards Systemic Approach” / [ed] Gandolfo Dominici, Business Systems Laboratory , 2015, p. 281-284Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Kurti, Erdelina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Toward Post Systems Thinking in the Conception of Whole-Part Relations2014In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Working Conference of the International Institute for Developmental Ethics, Maarssen, the Netherlands: Rozenberg Publishers, 2014, p. -111Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems thinking represent a diverse intellectual body that aims to support conception of phenomena. Systems thinking may be regarded as a reaction against the micro-reductionism inherent within the modernist scientific approach; more specifically in the latter’s conception ofwhole-part relations. While the propositions offered by systems thinking overcome that reductionism, we show that due to its biotic root-metaphor it instead imposes macro-reductionism. We proceed then by drawing on two alternative approaches that facilitate our conceptions of relations between a whole and its parts, in terms of encaptic relations and assemblage relations. A key conclusion advanced is that any utilization of analytical thinking and systems thinking must be conducted carefully and self-critically, due to their inherent limitations. As a consequence, this suggests an initiative for intellectual development of a post systems thinking approach, with regard to the conception of whole-part relations.

  • 55.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Lacroux, F
    Vidal, P
    Some Guidelines for the Design of Information Systems for Complex Decision Making: Preliminary Results2009In: Proceedings of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems / [ed] Bradley, G., Kommers, P, Algarve, Portugal, 2009, p. 203-208Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, AnitaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework (Festschrift in honor of Gunilla Bradley)2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework addresses the extensive area of effects of ICT on human beings and the interaction between ICT, individuals, organizations, and society. This premier reference source features contributions from over 45 distinguished researchers from around the world, each presenting high quality research on social informatics, human computer interaction, organizational behavior, and macro-ergonomics. This unique publication is perfect for students, teachers, researchers, engineers, practitioners, managers, policy-makers, and media alike.

  • 57.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Ten Guidelines for the Implementation of Information Systems: Research in Progress2008In: Proceedings of the 31th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 31:: Public systems in the future – possibilities, challenges and pitfalls / [ed] Asproth, V., Axelsson, K., Holmberg, S.C., Ihlström, C., Lindblad-Gidlund, K., and Sundgren, B, Åre, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a Model for Implementation of Information Systems (IS). Its focusis on the organizational aspects of an IS implementation, where the objective is tosecure that the to-be IS users will use the to-be IS; hence hardware, software, andother aspects of the information technology itself are not accounted by this model.The key challenge addressed here is the many reported failures of IS implementationas derived from the organizational challenges rather than purely informationtechnology. The proposed model is built on the so-called Organization InformationSystem paradigm that regards an organization and its IS as one conceptual unitrather than considering the IS as an adjunct to the organization – the latter typical forthe conventional Management Information System paradigm. Therefore, the ISimplementation is contextualised within a process for the development oforganizations, and proposes the “Effect-Behaviour-Resource-Influence Loop” as amechanism of change, of the changed organization. In this, it is the influence of theresources – human and machines – that changes the behaviour that in turn leads tothe change of effects, toward the desired state. Further, the proposed Model forInformation System Implementation provides also three needs of an organization tobe subjected of an IS intervention; these are the “change Motivation”, the “changeCapability”, and the “change Ability”. The proposed model is an outcome of a set ofcase studies of IS implementation, conducted in an Action Research mode, andinformed by selected theoretical bodies as well as the empirical challenge tosuccessfully implement an IS. The key contribution of this model is its empiricalexperience and its comprehensive approach to an IS implementation, rather than ananalytical focusing on a few variables only. However, the proposed model is still in itshypothetical phase of theory development, and is in a need of both further crossfertilisationwith various theoretical bodies as well as further empirical experience,where validations and modifications are made.

  • 58.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    In Search for Unity within the Diversity of Information Societies2011In: Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework (Festschrift in honor of Gunilla Bradley) / [ed] Darek M. Haftor; Anita Mirijamdotter, Hershey, New York: IGI Global, 2011, p. 540-546Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This final Chapter represents the responsibility, the privilege but also the aspiration of the two editors of this Gunilla Bradley Festschrift. The aspiration here is no less than to identify a key message that emerges out of the contributions in this volume considered as a whole. In other words, the question here is: what do all this research and reasoning say to us? Of course, each reader of this Volume will derive her or his own interpretation and thus also a key message, which we only see as the richness offered by this Festschrift. Therefore, the key message presented here must be regarded only as one possible message that is formed by the two editors’ own predispositions: intellectual, cultural, motivational, and other.

  • 59.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. Stockholm University.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    In Search for Unity within the Diversity of Information Societies: Linnaeus University Celebrates a Pioneer: Professor Gunilla Bradley2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 60.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    Stockholm University.
    Complementarity-based Approach in the Search for Patterns of Effective IT-use at the Individual Level2015In: Presented at the 22nd European Operations Management Association Conference, Neuchatel, Switzerland​, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Ståhl, P
    Proposal for a Systemic Enterprise Modeling Language2005In: Proceedings of the 38th Hawaii Inteernational Conference on Systems Sceinces, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    von Schéele, Fabian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The Time according to Taylor and Fayol: a hampering heresy in information society2015In: Presented at IAREP – SABE Joint Conference. Sibiu, Romania, September 3 – 6, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63. Johansson, Erika
    et al.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Magnusson, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Rosvall, Jan
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    On Building Information Modeling: an explorative study2014Report (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Cavusoglu, Hasan
    University of British Colombia, Canada.
    Benbasat, Izak
    University of British Colombia, Canada.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Assessing Self-Justification as an Antecedent of Noncompliance with Information Security Policies2013In: ACIS 2013: Information systems: Transforming the Future: Proceedings of the 24th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, RMIT University , 2013, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to extend our knowledge about employees’ noncompliance with Information Security Policies (ISPs), focusing on employees’ self-justification as a result of escalation of commitment that may trigger noncompliance behaviour. Escalation presents a situation when employees must decide whether to persist or withdraw from nonperforming tasks at work. Drawing on self-justification theory and prospect theory, our model presents two escalation factors in explaining employee’s willingness to engage in noncompliance behaviour with ISPs: self-justification and risk perceptions. We also propose that perceived benefits of noncompliance and perceived costs of compliance, at the intersection of cognitive and emotional driven acts influence self-justification. The model is tested based on 376 respondents from banking industry. The results show that while self-justification has a significant impact on willingness, risk perceptions do not moderate their relation. We suggest that future research should explore the roles of self-justification in noncompliance to a greater extent.

  • 65.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Stockholm University.
    Exploring the Notion of Information: A Proposal for a Multifaced Understanding2011In: tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society / Unified Theory of Information Research Group, ISSN 1726-670X, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 305-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Man’s notion of ‘information’ is essential as it guides human thinking, planning, and consequent actions. Situations such as the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the financial crisis in Greece in 2010, and the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 are just a few instances of constant growing empirical dilemmas in our global society where information plays a central role. The meaning of what information is has clear implications for how we deal with it in our practical lives, which in turn may give rise to situations that we would prefer to be without. In this sense, the notion of information has evidently presented the need to question what it really means and how it dominates the functioning of our global society. To address this fundamental issue of information, two questions are explored and presented in this paper: What notions of information are dominating the scholarly literature? And what are the differences between these notions? To answer these questions, we have conducted a comprehensive literature survey of more than two hundred scholarly publications. Detailed analyses of the content of these publications identified four kinds of forms of information notions. The results show that these four forms present diverse and opposing views of the notion of information, labelled as the ‘quartet model of information’. These ad-dress different foci, contexts, and challenges. In addition, we propose an alternative and novel understanding of the notion of information, associated with how information functions in our global society. This understanding offers a new perspective intended to address significant needs of the information society.

  • 66.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information Inadequacy: Instances that Causes the Lack of Needed Information2012In: The 5th Workshop on Information Logistics and Knowledge Supply (ILOG2012), at the 11th International Conference on Perspectives in Business Informatics Research (BIR2012): Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, September 24-26, 2012. Proceedings: “Satellite Workshops & Doctoral Consortium.”, 2012, p. 7-17Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Information Inadequacy: Some Causes of Failures in Human and Social Affairs2011In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, ISSN 1566-6379, E-ISSN 1566-6379, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes initial steps in facilitating researchers and practitioners to increase the relevance of information for their contexts. Our focus is on forging new possibilities to understand and improve the contemporary dilemma of information inadequacy. We define information inadequacy as vulnerable and inadequate information, composed by the dichotomy of information lack and/or of information overflow, which impose complexities and unexpected behaviour in human and social affairs. By exploring the lack of needed information in human and social affairs, we conducted an inquiry of different empirical and research objects that relate to information inadequacy (for example, empirical situations, theories, or other theoretically and practically based artifacts). The question that emerges then is: How to secure that the needed information is provided to the recipient at the right time, reducing the cause of unpredictable failures and fatalities in our global society? To answer this question, our paper presents initial guiding with a systematic approach that focuses on evaluating and further improving research and practice for information relevance. The empirical cases are mostly based on situations, such as: the financial failures of the Lehman Brothers Bankruptcy 2008, and the Enron bankruptcy 2001; or the disasters of the Space Shuttle Columbia 2003, and Space Shuttle Challenger 1986. The analyses are examined using theories of information behaviour that influence communication processes, from where two or more different actors are necessary to engage in activities of information exchange. The results include the identification of four information exchange patterns: influenced, intentional, hindered, unawares. Furthermore, we discuss implications of the model for practices with information. The paper concludes by challenging the role of information inadequacy in all economic, social and political affairs that remains problematic.

  • 68.
    Koczkas, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Exploring the Fit Between Product Market Strategy and Business Model: A Set of Propositions2016In: The European Business & Management Conference 2016, Brighton, United Kingdom 7-10 July, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central quests in strategy research are the contingent effects of strategy on a firm’s performance, where the underlying assumption is that there is no single optimal strategy for all organizations, rather strategy variables alters according to contingent factors. While previous research has examined extensively the fit between an organization’s environment and structure, recent studies explore the fit between a firm’s two key sources of economic value creation, the product and the business model, by asking how do firm’s business model theme and product market strategy interact to impact firm’s performance. We follow Amit and Zott’s path breaking notion of a business model (2001) and their search for fit between the business model theme and product market strategy (2008), which shows that novelty-centered business model have positive effect on performance when coupled with differentiation, cost-leadership and early entry product market strategies. The present research aims to further advance that initiative by formulating and justifying a set of new research propositions, where conventional product market strategies (differentiation vs. costs leadership, mass vs. niche market, early vs. late entry) are matched with the four business model themes (novelty, efficiency, lock-in, and complementarity). The contribution here is a theoretically based stipulation of a set of new conditions that conditions a firm’s performance

  • 69.
    Koczkas, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Fit between product market strategy and business model theme in digital markets: A set of propositions2016In: 10th European Conference on Information Systems Management,  Évora, Portugal on 8-9 September 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research has examined extensively the fit between an organization’s environment and structure, it was unable to account for the unique sources of economic value creation that the emerged digital markets established. Recent development of the Business Model construct addresses the peculiarities of digital markets and has initiated expiration of the fit between a firm’s two key sources of economic value creation: its product and its business model, with the underlying question: how do firm’s business model themes and product market strategies interact to impact firm’s performance. Following Amit and Zott’s (2008) path breaking study, where the novelty-cantered business model was found to have positive effect on performance when coupled with differentiation, cost-leadership and early entry product market strategies, the present research aims to further advance that initiative. We formulate and justify a set of new research propositions where conventional product market strategies (differentiation vs. costs leadership, mass vs. niche market, early vs. late entry) are matched with the four business model themes (novelty, efficiency, lock-in, and complementarity). The propositions focus on the fit between product market strategies and business model themes with contingencies to digital business contexts, and thereby potentially accounting for the peculiarities of digitalization as manifested in their unique shape of network effects and marginal cost structures. 

  • 70.
    Kurti, Erdelina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Barriers and Enablers of Digital Business model Transformation2015In: Proceedings of 9th European Conference on IS Management and Evaluation, ECIME 2015: The University of West England, UK, 21-22 September 2015 / [ed] Renata Paola Dameri, Roberto Garelli, Marina Resta, Academic Conferences Limited, 2015, p. 262-269Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents some current results from an ongoing research into how a non-digital business model may transform successfully into a digital business model.

    Amit and Zott’s break-through business model construct is assumed here as the core conceptual foundation for digitalization. Its main focus on economic value creation and appropriation attempts to unify several contemporary theoretical strands (Schumpeterian innovation, value chain logic, product-market strategies, resource-based view of firm, transaction cost economics and strategic networks). Building upon this conceptualization and by using a digital transformation of a bookselling company as a means of illustration, we bring to the forefront two central arguments to be considered for a successful transformation of business model from non-digital to digital. First, digital transformations shift the notion of firm centric value creation and as such cannot be comprehended without the network. Thus the digital transformation of business models implies multi-actor coordination, where no single executive authority may command the desired behavior, other than by means of negotiations. Secondly, the economic characteristics of digital information challenge conventional managerial wisdom such as the function of positive network effects being opposite to the conventional business logic, reduction of transaction costs and the negligible marginal costs, among others. A key assumption here is that managers’ wisdom is challenged by these characteristics of digital information economics as they act as filters that enable and hinder opportunities, adequate analysis, planning and decision-making.

    A review of previous studies on business model change indicates that digital transformation of business models is rather under-researched. Analysis show that whilst these studies provide solid grounds on the factors that hinder and enable business model change, they may not be sufficient to explain and account for digital transformation of business models. Majority of these studies provide very weak connections of the business model with the value network thus disregarding the very distinct feature of business model. We consider that future exploration of these central arguments that this study advocates, would potentially provide insights on how to embark into a successful transformation, and thereby avoid the tragic fate of Blockbuster.

  • 71.
    Kurti, Erdelina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The Role of Path Dependence in the Business Model Adaptation: From Traditional to Digital Business Models2014In: Proceedings of the Mediterranean Conference on Information Systems, Verona, Italy, September 3-5 / [ed] Mola, L., Carugati, A., Kokkinaki, A. and Pouloudi, N., AIS Electronic Library (AISeL) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital context has driven new prospects of value creation and capture thus challenging and disrupting the traditional business models. Organizations need business models to transform the specific inherent logic of digital information products into new ways of creating economic value creation and appropriation. Thus, the business model change is an imperative for organizations to exploit value creation opportunities and to survive. Over time, however, business models become deeply embedded and they represent the dominant logic of the organization. Moreover the shift to the digital context poses additional cognitive constrains due to the characteristics inherent in digital information products that are quite distinct from the conventional ones, hence requiring a fundamental shift of dominant logic. This proposed study aims to explore the role of cognitive path dependencies originating in the non-digital context as an isolating mechanism in the process of creation of new digital business model.

  • 72.
    Lembke, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    People-Centered Management and Leadership: Design of an MBA-program2011In: NFF 2011 August 20-24 / [ed] Lövsted, J., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73. Meiling, P
    et al.
    Haftor, Darek
    A systematic framework for the support of process-oriented long-term maintenance of generic multi-apartment buildings2009In: Documentation and Maintenance Planning Model – DoMaP. A response to the need for conservation and long-term maintenance of facades of modern multi-apartment buildings / [ed] Meiling, P., Göteborg: Chalmers University Press , 2009, p. 96-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Haftor, Darek
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    The emerging discipline of Information Logistics in need of a Systemic Foundation.2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 75.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kajtazi, Miranda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    The Gunilla Bradley Story: Linnaeus University Celebrates a Pioneer: Professor Gunilla Bradley2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 76.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Panel Discussion: ICT and Diversity of Information Societies2011In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human Beings 2011 / [ed] Bradley, G., Whitehouse, D., and Singh, G., 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel focuses on ICT and the diversity of information societies. It is a follow up on the seminar held to honor professor emerita Gunilla Bradley at the Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, in August 2010.

  • 77.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Parida, Vinit
    Vincent, Joakim
    Circular Business Models: What are they?2017In: The 24th Nordic Academy of Management Conference, Bodo, Norway, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Södertörn University.
    Rad, Fakhreddin Fakhrai
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Lund University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Uppsala Univiversity.
    RFID and ERP systems in supply chain management2018In: European Journal of Management and Business Economics, ISSN 2444-8451, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 171-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact of enterprise systems (ESs), in particular radio frequency identification (RFID) and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, on supply chain management (SCM). The results of this conceptual paper demonstrate that ERP and RFID systems contribute to SCM by improving supply chain integration. Supply chain integration occurs to facilitate the flow of financing, products, and information throughout the chain. In this regard, ERP and RFID contribute to integration by enhancing the information flow across the supply chain. Design/methodology/approach - This paper proposes a conceptual model developed from the findings of literature review within the research domains of SCM, ESs, and supply chain integration. Findings - This conceptual study contributes to the existing theory by linking the concept of information technology, ESs to SCM. The conceptual model in this paper may provide insights for executives who wish to implement ERP or RFID systems in their businesses in order to achieve higher integration, both within internal sectors and also with supply chain partners. Originality/value - The findings in this study contribute to the theory base by linking the concept of information technologies, ESs to SCM. The conceptual model presented in this paper can provide insights for executives who wish to implement ERP or RFID systems in their businesses in order to achieve higher integration within internal sectors and with supply chain partners. This study offers new understandings by investigating the impact of ERP and RFID together on SCM.

  • 79.
    Pashkevich, N.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    In Search of Patterns of Information Technology Use for the Improvement of Information Worker Productivity: a Research Proposal2013In: The 13th European Workshop on Efficiency and Productivity Analysis (EWEPA"13), Helsinki, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study targets a particular theoretical gap within the “nano-level” of the IT productivity paradox discourse that is concerned with challenges in identifying a productivity increase in operations that are conducted with the support of IT. The objective is to find out how IT may be used to increase the productivity of a white collar professional, such as an accountant, an architect, a recruiter, or a journalist. The focus set of this study is on the lack of empirical data with regards to how IT-use contributes to productivity gains at the individual and task level. The proposed study differs from earlier research on the relationship between computerization and productivity by focusing on how IT-use can enhance information worker productivity based on the common set of information-processing functions from both descriptive and normative research approach perspectives.

  • 80.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Chowdhury, Soumitra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. Uppsala University.
    IT-productivity in the Operations and Maintenance of Road Freight Transportation and Logistics: Insights from the Past Decades2019In: Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop and Congress on eMaintenance: Trends in Technologies & methodologies, challenges, possibilities and applications / [ed] Miguel Castano Arranz, Ramin Karim, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although IT is playing a significant role in road freight transportation and logistics, there exists a lack of comprehensive knowledge of IT and productivity in the area. This paper presents a review of the research on IT-productivity in the operations and maintenance of road freight transportation and logistics as well as proposes directions for future research. We have conducted the review in both academic and non-academic sources. Based on 26 papers, we have structured the review in three levels: industry level, firm level, and individual level. A number of insights have been made, which characterize the current state of knowledge. Several insights call for further research. We have found that there is a diversity in the terminologies when referring to the positive impact of IT on fuel efficiency for road freight transportation and logistics. Our findings suggest that there is a lack of methodological diversity while understanding the effect of IT on load efficiency in transportation. The existing field experiments can be characterized by two phase design, small sample size and short time for the intervention phase. There is a lack of conceptualization of complementarities when the existing studies show the importance of incentives and training with the introduction of a new digital technology in relation to productivity. This paper is a first attempt to synthesize relevant research on IT-productivity in the operations and maintenance in road freight transportation and logistics.

  • 81.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    A Search for Patterns of Effective IT-Use at theIndividual Level: A Complementarity Theory-Based Approach2014In: The North American Productivity Workshop VIII, June 4th – 7th Ottawa, Canada, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    A Search for Patterns of Productivity Gains of Information Workers2013In: Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation: Faculty of Management, University of Gdańsk, Poland 12-13 September / [ed] Przemyslaw Lech, Gdańsk, Poland: Academic Conferences Limited, 2013, p. 239-245Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Notwithstanding its positive characteristics and enormous potential, IT has become a difficult challenge for researchers and managers. In 1987, Nobel Prize Laureate, Robert Solow remarked that computers appeared everywhere except in the productivity statistics. The shift from a manufacturing-based society to an information-based society became one of the reasons for the revision of the dilemma between IT-use and individual productivity. In an information-intensive environment it becomes increasingly difficult for managers to control the production process, a consequence of a lack of scientific-based approaches in the measurement of information worker productivity. Moreover, the impact of IT-use on productivity of individuals employed in information-intensive occupations is little understood and rarely modelled. Current studies on information worker productivity have succeeded to uncover some new patterns regarding information worker productivity and IT-use. A critical evaluation of these studies with regard to its strengths and limitations reveals some important challenges, which in turn lay a foundation for the herein proposed empirical study that aims to advance further understanding of the underlying mechanisms of information worker productivity and IT-use in terms of four information handling functions - generation, transfer, storage and transformation. The proposed study aims also to add to the growing body of understanding both intra- and inter-project multitasking practices and their impact on individual productivity. A better understanding of how IT-use can contribute to business value and what productivity benefits IT-use can provide the information worker is presented in this study from the perspective of both a descriptive and normative research approaches, which is applied through a set of case studies, quantitative surveys and experiments. The principal product of the research will be an inventory of a set of patterns of IT-use for the improvement of information worker productivity at the individual level based on intermediate business-process metrics of precise information worker’s workflow with interaction to IT-use.

  • 83.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    About IT unemployment: Investigating normative aspects of the “broken link"2014In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Working Conference of the International Institute for Developmental Ethics (IIDE), Maarssen, the Netherlands: Rozenberg Publishers, 2014, p. -92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of information and communication technologies has given rise to some moral challenges that deserve particular attention. One such is the discrepancy between productivity growth and technological unemployment. This paper argues that if subsequent undesirable consequences of technological unemployment are to be avoided, there is a need for additional research to embed normative considerations into a scientific context, by linking technological progress with the ‘Ought to Be’ of the economic and societal order.

  • 84.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Complementarities of Effective Individual IT Use: Preliminary Results2016In: ECIS 2016 Proceedings, Association for Information Systems, 2016, article id 44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents preliminary results from an ongoing empirical study that seeks to understand the relationship between IT-complementary factors and the individual productivity of information workers. Although there is substantial evidence of positive IT complementarity effects on productivity at macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of the economy, we still lack knowledge on the configuration of these factors at the individual level. To investigate this gap, we have designed a new research model of an information worker’s individual productivity when an IT system is used jointly and synchronously with both individual and organizational factors. The model is tested in a longitudinal field study of sales operations of an international pharmaceutical company with a multi sub-case setup. While we continue to collect data, preliminary findings from difference-in-difference analysis are presented here and demonstrate that the introduction of a “full” set of IT complementarities has had a positive and significant effect on the number of sales calls performed.

  • 85.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Complementarities of Productive IT-use at Individual Level: Preliminary Results2016In: The 23d European Operations Management Association Conference (EurOMA), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. 1983.
    Haftor, Darek
    Uppsala University.
    Exploring Complementarities of Productive IT use through Methodological Complementarism2018In: Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods, ISSN 1477-7029, E-ISSN 1477-7029, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 128-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors affecting productivity and particularly IT‑enabled productivity increase have been and still remain the major concern for many business sectors. While previously researchers investigated what factors and their complementary relationships affect organizational productivity, organizational economists came to the conclusion that an organization cannot be regarded anymore as a black box since it is not an organization per se that conducts the very work but its resources with the basic elements being a single worker and a single IT system. Currently, it is proposed that we understand organizational internal mechanisms and their functioning for productivity through the lens of complementarity theory and maintain that when factors are synchronized correctly they can bring significant productivity increase. Identification of the complementarity factors and their synchronization bring, however, a major challenge for research methodology. Unlike conventional studies where a few variables independent of each other cause a reaction to dependent variables, in the context of complementarities, the assumption is closer to the real‑world experiences where a set of factors interact with each other to affect one or several dependent variables. The present paper addresses this difficulty of researching complementary factors for an individual knowledge worker and their productivity. The approach taken here is to use multiple and different research methods in a complementary manner, so that the results from each study of the same kind of phenomenon uncover new insights that cannot be derived from any such single study. The results from this multi‑method approach demonstrate new insights into the interplay between the studied factors that condition the productivity of knowledge workers and show the importance of analysing a complex phenomenon with complementary research methods. 

  • 87.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    IT-Driven Productivity at the Individual Level: Complementarities Matter2014In: Proceedings of the 8th European Conference on IS Management and Evaluation: ECIME 2014, Ghent, Belgium / [ed] Jan Devos, Steven De Haas, Academic Conferences Limited, 2014, p. 380-383Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a conceptual model for the understanding of IT‐ driven productivity at the individual level when a new IT‐system is deployed. The existence of the IT productivity paradox at different economic levels has been a concern for many researchers. Since evidence demonstrates that IT, in fact, in‐ creases productivity at the macro‐, meso‐ and micro‐  level, current research at‐ tention shifted to the individual and task level. Since the last decade, the idea that there is a need for a set of organizational factors to be changed in a synchronized fashion when introducing a new IT‐system has received particular attention. To investigate these proposals, we have designed a new research model aimed at analyzing individual productivity growth when a new IT‐system is deployed, jointly and in a synchronized manner, with both individual capital and organizational capital factors. The aim of this model is to advance our understanding and devel‐ op propositions, which will require further testing, of patterns of effective IT‐use in order to increase productivity of an information worker. A better understand‐ ing of the patterns of effective IT‐use together with other factors may help de‐ termine where research and managerial efforts have to be concentrated in order to enhance individual productivity of information workers.

  • 88.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Methodological Insights From two Experimental Studies Into Complementarities of Productive IT use2018In: ECRM 2018  - Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Research Methodology for Business and Management Studies / [ed] Paola Demartini & Michela Marchiori, UK: Academic Conferences Limited, 2018, p. 303-309Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have attempted to determine factors that condition the IT-enabled productivity of information workers but have not yet arrived at a comprehensive conclusion. A so-called complementarity systems approach has been proposed recently, holding that a number of factors need to be managed in a deliberately synchronized manner in order to generate productivity gains from such workers. However, this proposal does not provide specifications for how such synchronization must be conducted and researched. To remedy this gap, this research conducts two parallel and differently designed studies: a longitudinal quasi-randomized field experiment and a well-controlled online experiment. Regarded jointly, each study offers insights into the investigated phenomenon that the other does not, indicating that both studies complement each other. In particular, these two different research approaches to study the complementarities of productive IT use help us to establish how further research design should be developed to investigate individual productivity when a new, more aligned IT system in a company is used together with complementary factors. Moreover, the results from both studies jointly demonstrate that a mandatory context of IT use might provide better access to individuals with both adaptive and innovative cognitive styles than a voluntary working environment. Finally, both studies demonstrate that more detailed research is needed to understand how the productivity of individuals differs when inappropriate cognitive styles are included in complementarity set-ups. Therefore, the two studies offer new insights into the interplay between the studied factors that condition the productivity of information workers and show the importance of analysing a complex phenomenon with multiple, different, and complementary research designs, as each design has inherent conditions with opportunities and limitations, in order to reveal characteristics about the phenomenon being investigated.

  • 89.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Software programmer productivity: a complementary-based research model2017In: Proceedings of the 25th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), Guimarães, Portugal, June 5-10, 2017, Association for Information Systems, 2017, , p. 10p. 2755-2766Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The identification of the factors that condition a software programmer’s productivity remains a key challenge for both scholars and practitioners. While a number of studies have focused on the impact of one or a few particular factors, the way these factors jointly condition programmer productivity is still unknown. This paper presents a conceptual model aimed at a comprehensive understanding of the factors that complement each other to govern the productivity of a software programmer. The model is based on complementarity theory and its systems approach and addresses an individual worker’s productivity, which accounts for cognitive, technological, and organizational characteristics. The analyzed factors are organized into a system of complementarities, offering two propositions that specify the conditions of a programmer’s productivity. The model’s key contribution lies in its unique configuration of two systems of complementarities, which have the potential to add to the literature on the productivity of software programmers. The proposed model can be employed as a guidance for the design of empirical investigations of the conditions of individual software programmers’ productivity as well as information worker productivity in general.

  • 90.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    von Schéele, Fabian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Complementarities Matter: a Search for Patterns of Effective IT-use at the Individual Level2014In: Book of Abstracts 10th Asia Pacific Productivity Conference, 2014, University of Queensland , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents research in progress in terms of a conceptual model for the understanding of IT-driven productivity at the individual level. The existence of the IT productivity paradox at different economic levels had been a concern for many IS researchers. Since evidence demonstrates that IT, in fact, increases productivity at the macro-, meso- and micro- level, current research attention shifted to the individual and task level of IT-driven productivity. In this regard, recent studies have applied different theoretical foundations to investigate the relationship between IT-use and performance effect at the individual level in post adoption contexts. Since the last decade, the idea that there is a need for a set of organizational factors to be changed in a synchronized fashion, when introducing new IT, has received a particular attention from researchers (e.g. Bartel et al., 2007; Tambe et al., 2012; Aral et al., 2012; Brynjolfsson & Milgrom, 2012). These studies have addressed the need for the joint adaptation of IT-use and innovative human resource management practices to enhance productivity gains at the firm, establishment and business unit performance levels. To investigate these proposals, we have designed a new research model aimed to research productivity growth when IT is deployed, jointly and in a synchronized manner, with both individual capital and organizational capital factors, at the individual level. The latter’s aims to advance further our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of information worker productivity at the individual level. An understanding of the patterns of effective IT-use together with other factors may help determine where research and managerial efforts have to be concentrated in order to enhance individual productivity of information workers. Key words: IT productivity paradox, complementarity, patterns, ITdriven productivity, individual level.

  • 91.
    Pashkevich, Vohla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    An Analytical Framework for the Analysis of an Information Economy2017In: Strategic Innovative Marketing / [ed] Kavoura, A Sakas, DP Tomaras, P, Springer, 2017, p. 647-653Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analytical framework, understood as a set of interrelated attributes and analytical methods, aimed to enable the identification and characterization of a country's information economy. This characterization is in terms of the size, structure, and dynamics of an information economy, and more specifically its economic value created, labour input, jobs, and their wages. An application of the proposed analytical framework has the potential to uncover hidden economic structures and processes, which in turn may guide policy formulation for future job creation, educational efforts, and business environment stimulation, all aimed at a positive economic development.

  • 92.
    Pashkevich, Vohla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. vohla.pashkevich@lnu.se.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Size, Structure and Growth of the Swedish Information Economy2016In: The 24th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2016), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Pashkevich, Vohla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. vohla.pashkevich@lnu.se.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Size, Structure and Growth of the Swedish Information Economy: a First Account2016In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Business and Information (BAI 2016) : , International Business Academics Consortium , 2016, p. 164-180Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Pashkevich, Vohla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    Stockholm University.
    Swedish Information Economy: A Preliminary Account2017In: Dilemmas 2015 Papers from the 18th Annual International Conference Dilemmas for Human Services: Organizing, Designing and Managing / [ed] Sisse Finken, Christina Mörtberg, Anita Mirijamdotter, Vaxjo: LnuPress , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent developments and adoptions of digital technologies give rise to the growth of information economies, understood as an aggregate of economic activities that produce informational outputs. Several key characteristics of an information economy differ to the conventional economic wisdom derived from the industrial age, which may impose governmental policy implications and therefore constitutes a key question: how to govern the newly emerged information economy with the thinking of the industrial age economy. Resolving this problem requires, among others, comprehensive understanding of information economies. To that end, Sweden is among the most advanced adopters of digital technologies and represents therefore a suitable empirical base for the investigation of an information economy. This paper offers preliminary results from a first ever account of the Swedish information economy in terms of its value created, jobs and wages; this account shows that the Swedish economy is dominated by its information economy, which requires a careful attention of policy makers.

  • 95.
    Pashkevich, Volha
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Pashkevich, Natallia
    Stockholm Business School, Sweden.
    The Swedish Information Economy: Current Evidence and Key Government Policy Implications2017In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Society and Information Technologies (ICSIT 2017), International Institute of Informatics and Systemics, 2017, p. 23-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that most of the largest economies in the world are becoming information economies (understood as an aggregate of economic activities that produce information outputs) in terms of value added (GNP) and jobs. Sweden is among the most advanced adopters of ICT and represents therefore a suitable empirical base for the investigation of an information economy. The data reveal that the largest part of the Swedish economy in terms of GNP value added is constituted by information services. This study presents some surprising economic structures never before uncovered, which are discussed here and then contextualized in terms of implications for public policy making. 

  • 96.
    von Schéele, Fabian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    A Workload Equation that accounts for Human Cognitive Time Distortion2014In: 21st EurOMA Conference Operations Management in an Innovation Economy, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    von Schéele, Fabian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Cognitive Distortion Accounted Workload in Service Operations2011In: NFF 2011 August 20-24 / [ed] Lövsted, J., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98. von Schéele, Fabian
    et al.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Cognitive Time Distortion Accounted Workload in Human Operations2011In: 17th Annual Working Conference of theInternational Institute for Developmental Ethics / [ed] Strijbos, S., Amsterdam: Rozenberg Publishers, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    von Schéele, Fabian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Cognitive time distortion as a source of economic risk2015In: OR 2015, The International Conference on Operations Research, September 1- 4, 2015, Wien, Austria, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    von Schéele, Fabian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Haftor, Darek
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Cognitive Time Distortion as a Source of Risk in Economic Organizations: Conceptual Foundations2014In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Working Conference of the International Institute for Developmental Ethics (IIDE), Maarssen, the Netherlands: Rozenberg Publishers, 2014, p. 124-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces two kinds of risks present in any economic organization: the risk of cognitive time distortion and the risk of economic distortion. These two kinds of risks are related in a complex and non-linear manner, so that the cognitive distortion risk gives rise to the economic distortion risk. By monitoring the cognitive distortion risk, managers may also control the economic distortion risk. Basic conceptual foundations for the conception of these two kinds of risks, originating in unconditional human cognitive time distortion, are elaborated in this paper.

    “.. if economic organization is formidably complex, which it is, and if economic agents are subject to very real cognitive limits, which they are, then failures of alignment will occur routinely.” – O.E. Williamson, 1991: 79

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