lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 66 of 66
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Orupold, Kaja
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, Marika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Fractionation of Pb and Cu in the fine fraction (< 10 mm) of waste excavated from a municipal landfill2017In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 1175-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fractionation of metals in the fine fraction (<10 mm) of excavated waste from an Estonian landfill was carried out to evaluate the metal (Pb and Cu) contents and their potential towards not only mobility but also possibilities of recovery/extraction. The fractionation followed the BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, and the exchangeable (F1), reducible (F2), oxidizable (F3) and residual fractions were determined. The results showed that Pb was highly associated with the reducible (F2) and oxidizable (F3) fractions, suggesting the potential mobility of this metal mainly when in contact with oxygen, despite the low association with the exchangeable fraction (F1). Cu has also shown the potential for mobility when in contact with oxygen, since high associations with the oxidizable fraction (F3) were observed. On the other hand, the mobility of metals in excavated waste can be seen as beneficial considering the circular economy and recovery of such valuables back into the economy. To conclude, not only the total concentration of metals but also a better understanding of fractionation and in which form metals are bound is very important to bring information on how to manage the fine fraction from excavated waste both in terms of environmental impacts and also recovery of such valuables in the economy.

  • 52.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Orupold, Kaja
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Speciation of Metals in the Fine Fraction of Solid Waste From an Excavated Landfill2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Salomon, Paulo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Edna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Effects from log-yard stormwater runoff on the microalgae Scenedesmus subspicatus: Intra-storm magnitude and variability2011In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 185, no 2-3, p. 732-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the effects posed by stormwater runoff from an industrial log-yard on the microalgae Scenedesmus subspicatus. The effects of stormwater runoff sampled during two rain events were determined by exposing S. subspicatus cells to different concentrations (% v:v) of each sample. The effects were measured as the percentage change in growth rates in relation to a control culture after exposure times of 24, 48, 72 and 96h. The runoff from the first rain event had no negative effects to S.subspicatus, posing in most cases growth stimulation, whereas the runoff from the second rain event inhibited algae growth. Differences in runoff physico-chemical characteristics combined with the hydrological factors of each rain event explained these opposite effects. The hypothesis of toxic first flush phenomenon was confirmed in the second rain event on the basis of normalized inhibitory effects and runoff volume. It was found that 42, 51 and 50% of the inhibitory effects during exposures of 24, 48 and 72h are associated with the initial 4% of the total discharged volume. The fact that negative effects were observed in the two runoff events analyzed here, raises concern about the potential environmental threats posed by runoff originated from wood-based industrial areas during the entire hydrological year.

  • 54.
    Kumar, Eva
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rosenlund, JoacimLinnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.Kaczala, FabioLinnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.Hogland, WilliamLinnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linnaeus Eco-Tech 2012 proceedings: Eighth International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation Between Companies and Institutions in the Nordic Countries, the Baltic Sea Region, and the World. Conference on Natural Sciences and Environmental Technologies for Waste and Wastewater Treatment, Remediation, Emissions Related to Climate, Environmental and Economic Effects2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Salomon, Paulo
    Deapartment of Marine Biology , Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ).
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Toxicity on the Microalgae Desmodesmus subspicatus: Wastewater Generated during washing procedures in a Wood-floor industry2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Salomon, Paulo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Department of Marine Biology , Institute of Biology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) , Rio de Janeiro , Brazil.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Wastewater generated during cleaning/washing procedures in a wood-floor industry: toxicity on the microalgae Desmodesmus subspicatus2012In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 33, no 21, p. 2439-2446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In industries based on dry processes, such as wood floor and wood furniture manufacture, wastewater is mainly generated after cleaning of surfaces, storage tanks and machinery. Owing to the small volumes, onsite treatment options and potential environmental risks posed to aquatic ecosystems due to discharge of these wastewaters are seldom investigated. In the present study, the effects of cleaning wastewater streams generated at two wood floor production lines on Desmodesmus subspicatus were investigated. The microalgae was exposed to different wastewater concentrations (100, 50, 25, 12.5 and 6.25% v:v) and the algae growth evaluation was based on in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, cell density, cell size (number of cells/colony) and cell ratio (length/width). Inhibitory effects of the tested wastewaters on the microalgae were positively related to concentration and negatively related to exposure time. The EC50,24 h of blade cleaning wastewater (BCW) and floor cleaning wastewater (FCW) were 3.36 and 5.87% (v:v), respectively. No negative effect on cell colony formation was caused by BCW, whereas an increase of 90% unicellular cells was observed in FCW concentrations below 50% (v:v). At the lowest concentration (3.13% v:v) where no growth inhibition was observed, both wastewater streams caused changes in cell dimensions by increasing cell length and width. To conclude, wastewaters generated during cleaning procedures in the wood floor industries can have severe environmental impacts on aquatic organisms, even after high dilution. Therefore, these wastewaters must be treated before being discharged into water bodies.

  • 57.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Packed-Column of Granular Activated Carbons for Removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand from Industrial Wastewater2013In: CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water, ISSN 1863-0650, E-ISSN 1863-0669, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 244-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal by packed-columns of activated carbon (AC) derived from two different materials (coal activated carbon, CAC and wood activated carbon, WAC) is reported as part of an on-site wastewater treatment system for handling small volumes of wastewater generated at wood-floor industries for which there are no proper on-site treatment options available in the market. The performance of the sorbents, the effect of bed depth (0.19 and 0.57 m) and volumetric load (0.10 and 0.24 m h−1) on the breakthrough curve of sorption systems were studied. The results indicated the feasibility of using both ACs to treat these wastewaters. At the bed depth (0.57 m), volumetric load (0.24 m h−1), and 30% breakthrough, CAC and WAC showed treatment capacity of 40.5 L kg−1 in 250 h and 23.8 L kg−1 in 63 h, respectively. This indicated that CAC requires longer retention times to reach a performance similar to WAC. The experimental data was fit into the bed depth-service time model showing that under the same conditions, CAC had higher maximum sorption capacity (N0) than WAC. Moreover, thermal regeneration at 500°C temperature could be a cost-effective procedure since the reuse of spent AC through such regeneration process for further treatment could still achieve 90% of the initial sorption capacity, reducing then costs for the use of new sorbents and also the need for waste disposal.

  • 58.
    Marchand, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Université de Montréal, Canada.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marchand, Lilian
    INRA, France.
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hijri, Mohamed
    Université de Montréal, Canada.
    Effect of Medicago sativa L. and compost on organic and inorganic pollutant removal from a mixed contaminated soil and risk assessment using ecotoxicological tests2016In: International journal of phytoremediation, ISSN 1522-6514, E-ISSN 1549-7879, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1136-1147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several Gentle Remediation Options (GRO), e.g. plant-based options (phytoremediation), singly and combined with soil amendments, can be simultaneously efficient for degrading organic pollutants and either stabilizing or extracting trace elements (TE). Here, a 5-month greenhouse trial was performed to test the efficiency of Medicago sativa L., singly and combined with a compost addition (30% w/w), to treat soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC), Co and Pb collected at an auto scrap yard. After five months, total soil Pb significantly decreased in the compost-amended soil planted with M. sativa, but not total soil Co. Compost incorporation into the soil promoted PHC degradation, M. sativa growth and survival, and shoot Pb concentrations (3.8 mg/kg DW). Residual risk assessment after the phytoremediation trial showed a positive effect of compost amendment on plant growth and earthworm development. The O2 uptake by soil microorganisms was lower in the compost-amended soil, suggesting a decrease in microbial activity. This study underlined the benefits of the phytoremediation option based on M. sativa cultivation and compost amendment for remediating PHC and Pb contaminated soils.

  • 59.
    Marchand, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Universite de Montreal, Canada.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hijri, Mohammed
    Universite de Montreal, Canada.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Physicochemical and Ecotoxicological Characterization of Petroleum Hydrocarbons and Trace Elements Contaminated Soil2018In: Polycyclic aromatic compounds (Print), ISSN 1040-6638, E-ISSN 1563-5333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underground storage tanks used for auto oil spill waste contain many hazardous materials, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) trace elements. These compounds pose a significant threat to the environment and affect negatively human health. The aim of this study was to characterize the soil of a former auto scrap yards in which oil spill tank leakage occurred in Sweden. The soil samples were collected from an area of 5 m2 around an oil the tank which was highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and trace elements (cobalt and lead). Another soil samples were collected from a nearby area that was not contaminated by PHC and they were considered as controls. The characterization of these soil samples was performed using two approaches. Analysis of the relevant physico-chemical soil properties included texture, organic matter, contaminant concentration and pH, while biological analyses were performed using three independent ecotoxicological tests with plant (Lepidium sativum), earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and soil microorganisms. Toxicity tests showed that contaminants had strongly negative effects on earthworm’s development and L. sativum shoots dry biomass in both PHC contaminated and control soils. These two parameters were the most sensitive in reflecting toxicity of study soils. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) in aqueous phase was four times higher than that of the solid phase even though a similar trend was observed in both phases (aqueous and solid). Moreover, microorganism’s respiration was high in PHC contaminated soils in comparison to control soils due to the mineralization of readily available OM and/or organic pollutants as well as the inhibitory effect of TE on soil respiration. The results clearly demonstrated that combination of chemical analyses with three toxicity tests was appropriate to characterize mixed PHC and TE contaminated soils.

  • 60.
    Marchand, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Mench, Michel
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Notini, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hijri, Mohamed
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pilot scale aided-phytoremediation of a co-contaminated soil2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 618, p. 753-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A pilot scale experiment was conducted to investigate the aided-phytoextraction of metals and the aided-phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) in a co-contaminated soil. First, this soil was amended with compost (10% w/w) and assembled into piles (Unp-10%C). Then, a phyto-cap of Medicago sativa L. either in monoculture (MS-10%C) or co-cropped with Helianthus annuus L. as companion planting (MSHA-10%C) was sown on the topsoil. Physico-chemical parameters and contaminants in the soil and its leachates were measured at the beginning and the end of the first growth season (after five months). In parallel, residual soil ecotoxicity was assessed using the plant species Lepidium sativum L. and the earthworm Eisenia fetida Savigny, 1826, while the leachate ecotoxicity was assessed using Lemna minor L. After 5 months, PH C10-C40, PAH-L, PAH-M PAH-H, Pb and Cu concentrations in the MS-10%C soil were significantly reduced as compared to the Unp-10% C soil. Metal uptake by alfalfa was low but their translocation to shoots was high for Mn, Cr, Co and Zn (transfer factor (TF) >1), except for Cu and Pb. Alfalfa in monoculture reduced electrical conductivity, total organic C and Cu concentration in the leachate while pH and dissolved oxygen increased. Alfalfa co-planting with sunflower did not affect the extraction of inorganic contaminants from the soil, the PAH (M and H) degradation and was less efficient for PH C10-C40 and PAH-L as compared to alfalfa monoculture. The co-planting reduced shoot and root Pb concentrations. The residual soil ecotoxicity after 5 months showed a positive effect of co-planting on L. sativum shoot dry weight (DW) yield. However, high contaminant concentrations in soil and leachate still inhibited the L. sativum root DW yield, earthworm development, and L. minor growth rate. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 61.
    Marchand, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mohamed, Hijri
    Université de Montréal, Canada.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Long-term phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons and metals contaminated soilManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Marchand, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mohamed, Hijri
    Université de Montréal, Canada.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mench, Michel
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Notini, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pilot scale ecopiling of petroleum hydrocarbons and metals contaminated soilManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Mutafela, Richard
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kihl, Anders
    Ragn Sells AB.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Characterization of Waste from Glassworks towards Resource Recovery - the Case of Madesjö Dumpsite2016In: Linnaeus Eco-Tech 2016, 21-23 November 2016, Kalmar, Sweden: Book of Abstracts, The 10th International Conference on Establishment of Cooperation between Companies and Institutions in the Nordic Countries, the Baltic Sea Region and the World. / [ed] Stina Alriksson, Jelena Lundström, William Hogland, Linnaeus University , 2016, p. 159-159Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘Glasriket’ of Sweden’s Småland region is characterized by an array of landfillsand dumpsites of glass and other raw material wastes from old glassworks. Most ofthe dumpsites contain heavy metals with leaching capabilities to soil and groundwater. As these metals could be potential resources that could be recovered into theresource loop, the characterization of these wastes can provide necessary informationabout the resource recovery potential. The current investigation focuses on the firststages by quantifying the amounts of selected metals (Ba, Cr and Zn) in the glassdeposit at Madesjö dumpsite as a case. The dump was sampled at nine different pointsand two levels per point. The samples were subjected to X-ray Fluorescence scanning(XRF) and leaching tests with further analyses of metals using ICP. According to theinvestigation, the highest metal contents in the solid phase were observed in Zn(average of 4515 mg/kg) while the lowest were observed in Cr (average of 72 mg/kg).In the liquid phase, the average metal concentrations were observed to be 0.37 mg/kg,0.02 mg/kg and 0.23 mg/kg for Ba, Cr and Zn respectively. These, however, are not inreadily available form, and so further investigations need to be done in order to findcost-effective techniques for their extraction. On the other hand, further investigationsneed to be done to ascertain the leaching potential by altering such leachingparameters as contact time and liquid to solid ratio.

  • 64.
    Mutafela, Richard
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Aid, Graham
    Ragn-Sells AB.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Methods for investigation of old glass waste dumpsites2018In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium On Enhanced Landfill Mining: 5-6 February 2018, Mechelen, Belgium / [ed] Peter Tom Jones & Lieven Machiels, Leuven, Belgium: European Enhanced Landfill Mining Consortium (EURELCO) , 2018, p. 145-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An old glass dumpsite in southern Sweden was mapped and investigated to locate

    glass abundance zones (“hotspots”) and understand physicochemical parametres of

    the waste. Global Positioning System (GPS) was used for mapping the site while a

    geophysical method of Electrical Resistivity was used for detecting glass hotspots in

    the dump. Test pits were excavated and samples taken, after which hand sorting,

    sieving and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning of the waste were used for

    physicochemical properties. Geophysical mapping was found to be a feasible nondestructive

    tool in locating glass hotspots. In terms of composition, glass was found

    to be the most abundant fraction at 90% average from all 4 sampling points. From

    particle size distribution, particles > 11.3 mm were more abundant (75% average)

    than particles < 11.3 mm. XRF scanning yielded As, Cd and Pb concentrations of 3,700

    mg/kg, 500 mg/kg and 5,300 mg/kg, respectively. In conclusion, it is possible to locate

    glass hotspots and excavate them carefully in readiness for metal extraction while

    avoiding the need for complicated sorting post-excavation.

  • 65.
    Svensson, Henric
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering Rio de Janeiro State University-UERJ Rio de Janeiro Brazil.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. CAPES Foundation Brazil Ministry of Education Brasília Brazil .
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Leaching patterns from wood of different tree species and environmental implications related to wood storage areas2014In: Water and Environment Journal, ISSN 1747-6585, E-ISSN 1747-6593, ISSN 1747-6593, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 277-284Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Batch tests were carried out with sawdust obtained from oak (Quercus robur), maple (Acer platanoides), pine (Pinus sylvestris), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and wood chips from oak and pine. Leaching of organic compounds expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in mg/kg of dry mass took place during the first 24 h. The following additional variables were analysed: pH, conductivity, colour, phenols, tannins and lignin, and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD7). When leachates obtained with oak wood chips and pine wood chips were compared, no significant difference was observed. However, in batch tests with sawdust, DOC released by oak (90 000 mg/kg) was significantly higher (P =  0.0001) than DOC released by pine (30 000 mg/kg). The results suggest that particle size is not the only variable affecting the leaching of organic compounds from wood. Regarding BOD, colour [platinum-cobalt (Pt-Co)], phenols, tannins and lignin, the leaching patterns differed among species, and oak was the species with the highest released values.

  • 66. Vystavna, Yulia
    et al.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sustainable Water Management and good sanitation through dry toilets. Case study Ukraine2006Conference paper (Other academic)
12 51 - 66 of 66
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf