lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 66 of 66
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksen, Marie Kampmann
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Martín-Fernández, J. A.
    University of Girona, Spain.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Recycling of plastic waste: Presence of phthalates in plastics from households and industry2016In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 54, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plastics recycling has the potential to substitute virgin plastics partially as a source of raw materials in plastic product manufacturing. Plastic as a material may contain a variety of chemicals, some potentially hazardous. Phthalates, for instance, are a group of chemicals produced in large volumes and are commonly used as plasticisers in plastics manufacturing. Potential impacts on human health require restricted use in selected applications and a need for the closer monitoring of potential sources of human exposure. Although the presence of phthalates in a variety of plastics has been recognised, the influence of plastic recycling on phthalate content has been hypothesised but not well documented. In the present work we analysed selected phthalates (DMP, DEP, DPP, DiBP, DBP, BBzP, DEHP, DCHP and DnOP) in samples of waste plastics as well as recycled and virgin plastics. DBP, DiBP and DEHP had the highest frequency of detection in the samples analysed, with 360 μg/g, 460 μg/g and 2700 μg/g as the maximum measured concentrations, respectively. Among other, statistical analysis of the analytical results suggested that phthalates were potentially added in the later stages of plastic product manufacturing (labelling, gluing, etc.) and were not removed following recycling of household waste plastics. Furthermore, DEHP was identified as a potential indicator for phthalate contamination of plastics. Close monitoring of plastics intended for phthalates-sensitive applications is recommended if recycled plastics are to be used as raw material in production.

  • 52.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Chemicals in material cycles2015In: Proceedings Sardinia 2015: Fifteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium / [ed] S. Margherita di Pula, CISA Publisher , 2015, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Material recycling has been found beneficial in terms of resource and energy performance and is greatly promoted throughout the world. A variety of chemicals is used inmaterials as additives and data on their presence is sparse. The present work dealt with paper as recyclable material and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) as chemical in focus. The results showed variations, between 0.83 and 32 μg/g, in the presence of DiBP in Danish waste paper and board and potential accumulation due to recycling.

  • 53.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in waste paper from danish household waste2014In: Presented at the 5th International Conference on Engineering for Waste and Biomass Valorisation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 25-28, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1930 and 1993 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) were extensively used in a variety of applications throughout the world. The applications were generally divided between closed (e.g. electrical transformers) and open. One of the most important open applications was as a solvent in carbonless copy paper. Although production and use of PCBs is heavily restricted in most of the countries, prolonged use of products containing PCBs as well as their physical-chemical characteristics and persistent nature allowed them to remain in the environment. The aim of the present paper was to provide an estimation of PCB concentrations in the waste paper samples from Danish household waste. Additionally, the goal was to estimate total amount of PCBs present in European paper and discuss implications it may have on paper recycling. Paper samples coming from Danish household waste were sorted into more detailed fractions to provide the composition of the waste flow. PCBs were quantified by means of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in all of the samples collected. Total concentrations of PCBs in paper and board ranged from 18 to 31 μg/kg. Results extrapolated to the total of European paper show that PCBs in paper represent relatively small amount when compared to other open type applications. Contamination of food with PCBs could potentially be of concern and should be assessed in more details.

  • 54.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Presence of potentially critical substances in waste paper2013In: Proceedings Sardinia 2013: fourteenth international waste management and landfill symposium, Cagliari, Italy: CISA Publisher , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper industry accounts for a significant share of the chemicals consumed by the industrial sector. Most of the chemicals used are additives, i.e. chemical substances added during pulp and paper preparation and final product manufacturing (conversion and printing) in order to facilitate the process itself as well as the quality or functionality of the final product. Such additives may be re-introduced to the paper production process once waste paper is recycled, leading to their accumulation and spreading in newly manufactured paper and board products. This study aimed at identification of the critical additives potentially present in paper products and quantification of a selected group of additives (Mineral Oil Hydrocarbons) in waste paper and board source segregated from Danish municipal solid waste.

  • 55.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Waste paper for recycling: Overview and identification of potentially critical substances2015In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 45, p. 134-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper product manufacturing involves a variety of chemicals used either directly in paper and pulp production or in the conversion processes (i.e. printing, gluing) that follow. Due to economic and environmental initiatives, paper recycling rates continue to rise. In Europe, recycling has increased by nearly 20% within the last decade or so, reaching a level of almost 72% in 2012. With increasing recycling rates, lower quality paper fractions may be included. This may potentially lead to accumulation or un-intended spreading of chemical substances contained in paper, e.g. by introducing chemicals contained in waste paper into the recycling loop. This study provides an overview of chemicals potentially present in paper and applies a sequential hazard screening procedure based on the intrinsic hazard, physical-chemical and biodegradability characteristics of the substances. Based on the results, 51 substances were identified as potentially critical (selected mineral oils, phthalates, phenols, parabens, as well as other groups of chemicals) in relation to paper recycling. It is recommended that these substances receive more attention in waste paper.

  • 56.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Granby, Kit
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Recycling of plastic waste: screening for brominated flame retardants (BFRs)2017In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 69, no November, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flame retardants are chemicals vital for reducing risks of fire and preventing human casualties and property losses. Due to the abundance, low cost and high performance of bromine, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have had a significant share of the market for years. Physical stability on the other hand, has resulted in dispersion and accumulation of selected BFRs in the environment and receiving biota. A wide range of plastic products may contain BFRs. This affects the quality of waste plastics as secondary resource: material recycling may potentially reintroduce the BFRs into new plastic product cycles and lead to increased exposure levels, e.g. through use of plastic packaging materials. To provide quantitative and qualitative data on presence of BFRs in plastics, we analysed bromophenols (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), dibromophenols (2,4- and 2,6-DBP) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP)), hexabromocyclododecane stereoisomers (α-, β-, and γ-HBCD), as well as selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in samples of household waste plastics, virgin and recycled plastics. A considerable number of samples contained BFRs, with highest concentrations associated with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS, up to 26,000,000 ng TBBPA/g) and polystyrene (PS, up to 330,000 ng ∑HBCD/g). Abundancy in low concentrations of some BFRs in plastic samples suggested either unintended addition in plastic products or degradation of higher molecular weight BFRs. The presence of currently restricted flame retardants (PBDEs and HBCD) identified in the plastic samples illustrates that circular material flows may be contaminated for extended periods. The screening clearly showed a need for improved documentation and monitoring of the presence of BFRs in plastic waste routed to recycling.

  • 57.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Olsson, Mikael Emil
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Götze, Ramona
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Quantification of chemical contaminants in the paper and board fractions of municipal solid waste2016In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 51, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemicals are used in materials as additives in order to improve the performance of the material or the production process itself. The presence of these chemicals in recyclable waste materials may potentially affect the recyclability of the materials. The addition of chemicals may vary depending on the production technology or the potential end-use of the material. Paper has been previously shown to potentially contain a large variety of chemicals. Quantitative data on the presence of chemicals in paper are necessary for appropriate waste paper management, including the recycling and re-processing of paper. However, a lack of quantitative data on the presence of chemicals in paper is evident in the literature. The aim of the present work is to quantify the presence of selected chemicals in waste paper derived from households. Samples of paper and board were collected from Danish households, including both residual and source-segregated materials, which were disposed of (e.g., through incineration) and recycled, respectively. The concentration of selected chemicals was quantified for all of the samples. The quantified chemicals included mineral oil hydrocarbons, phthalates, phenols, polychlorinated biphenyls, and selected toxic metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb). The results suggest large variations in the concentration of chemicals depending on the waste paper fraction analysed. Research on the fate of chemicals in waste recycling and potential problem mitigation measures should be focused on in further studies.

  • 58.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Bisphenol A and its structural analogues in household waste paper2015In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 44, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical produced in large volumes. Its main use is associated with polycarbonate plastic, epoxy resins and thermal paper. In contrast to other applications, thermal paper contains BPA in its un-reacted form as an additive, which is subjected to migration. Receiving a significant amount of attention from the scientific community and beyond, due to its controversial endocrine-disrupting effects, the industry is attempting to substitute BPA in variety of applications. Alternative phenolic compounds have been proposed for use in thermal paper; however, information to what extent BPA alternatives have been used in paper is sparse. The aim of the present work was to quantify BPA and its alternatives (bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol E (BPE), bisphenol B (BPB), 4-cumylphenol (HPP) and bisphenol F (BPF)) in waste paper and board from Danish households, thermal paper receipts, non-carbon copy paper and conventional printer paper. BPA was found in all waste paper samples analysed, while BPS was identified in 73% of them. Only BPB was not identified in any of the samples. BPA and BPS were found in the majority of the receipts, which contained no measurable concentrations of the remaining alternatives. Although receipts showed the highest concentrations of BPA and BPS, office paper, flyers and corrugated boxes, together with receipts, represented the major flux of the two compounds in waste paper streams.

  • 59.
    Rauch, Wolfgang
    et al.
    University Innsbruck, Austria.
    Ledin, Anna
    The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Deletic, Ana
    Monash University, Australia.
    Hunt III, William F. (Bill)
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Stormwater in urban areas2012In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 46, no 20, p. 6588-6588Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collection, storage and treatment of stormwater in urban areas has been one of the classical disciplines of sanitary and environmental engineering in the past. Waste and pollution transported by stormwater poses quantity and quality problems, is affecting public health and threatens the quality of the environment – most important surface water ecosystems. While traditional solutions have been mostly concerned with discharge and storage, quality issues gained increasing attention over the last years. Reason being both the pollution of the receiving water due to urban stormwater management and the potential use of stormwater as an alternative source of freshwater. This special issue of Water Research covers the most important issues related to management of stormwater in 26 articles. The objective is to give the reader an overview of the state of the art by presenting the most recent findings of high quality research within the new hot topics related to stormwater.

    The first part of this issue presents findings with relation to stormwater quality. The manuscripts deal with highway runoff, toxic substances, pathogens and priority pollutants. Results are given from monitoring campaigns (mostly from US, Europe and Australia) but also in the context of comprehensive literature reviews.

    The second half of the issue deals more broadly with a wider spectrum of topics. Papers are covering hydraulic aspects, filtration and clogging of stormwater facilities like swales, permeable pavement and biofilters. Another range of papers accounts for design principles of stormwater management, specifically focusing on sustainable solutions but also on the effect to pluvial flooding. Modeling, data treatment and uncertainty analysis with relation to stormwater concludes the special issue.

    The editors hope that by reading these papers major challenges will be visualized to the readers but also that there are promising solutions available to these challenges. We appreciate the valuable support of our colleagues who have devoted their time to review the manuscripts and thus ensure the quality of this issue. We also express sincere thanks to the staff of Water Research for their valuable editorial support.

  • 60.
    Revitt, D. Mike
    et al.
    Middlesex University, UK.
    Lundy, Lian
    Middlesex University, UK.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Viavattene, Cristoph
    Middlesex University, UK.
    Comparison of pollutant emission control strategies for cadmium and mercury in urban water systems using substance flow analysis2013In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 116, p. 172-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires Member States to protect inland surface and groundwater bodies but does not directly stipulate how the associated environmental quality standards should be achieved. This paper develops and assesses the performance of a series of urban emission control strategies (ECS) with an emphasis on the scientific and technological benefits which can be achieved. Data from the literature, in combination with expert judgement, have been used to develop two different semi-hypothetical case cities (SHCC), which represent virtual platforms for the evaluation of ECS using substance flow analysis (SFA). The results indicate that the full implementation of existing EU legislation is capable of reducing the total emissions of cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) by between 11% and 20%. The ability to apply voluntary reduction practices is shown to be particularly effective for Cd with the potential to further lower the overall emissions by between 16% and 27%. The most efficient protection of the receiving surface water environment is strongly influenced by the city characteristics with the introduction of stormwater treatment practices being particularly effective for one city (59% reduction of Hg; 39% reduction of Cd) and the other city being most influenced by the presence of efficient advanced wastewater treatment processes (63% reduction of Hg; 43% reduction of Cd). These reductions in receiving water loads are necessarily accompanied by either increases in stormwater sediment loadings (2.6–14.9 kg/year or 0.6–2.4 kg/year for Hg) or wastewater sludge loadings (45.8–57.2 kg/year or 42.0–57.4 kg/year for Cd).

  • 61.
    Revitt, Mike
    et al.
    Middlesex University, UK.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Donner, Erica
    Middlesex University, UK.
    The implications of household greywater treatment and reuse for municipal wastewater flows and micropollutant loads2011In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1549-1560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing worldwide interest in water recycling technologies such as greywater treatment and reuse suggests that additional research to elucidate the fate of xenobiotics during such practices would be beneficial. In this paper, scenario analyses supported by empirical data are used for highlighting the potential fate of a election of xenobiotic micropollutants in decentralised greywater treatment systems, and for investigation of the possible implications of greywater recycling for the wider urban water cycle. Potential potable water savings of up to 43% are predicted for greywater recycling based on Danish water use statistics and priority substance monitoring at a greywater treatment plant in Denmark. Adsorption represents an important mechanism for the removal of cadmium, nickel, lead and nonylphenol from influent greywater and therefore the disposal route adopted for the generated sludge can exert a major impact on the overall efficiency and environmental sustainability of greywater treatment. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 62.
    Scholes, Lian
    et al.
    Middlesex University, UK.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Preface2008In: Water, Air & Soil Pollution: Focus, ISSN 1567-7230, Vol. 8, no 5-6, p. 405-405Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As countries throughout the European Union (EU) struggle to implement the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), the need for robust data sets on the sources, flux and fate of a wide range of xenobiotics (defined here as man-made organic compounds, heavy metals and metalloids) is frequently referred to by both researchers and practitioners. However, the EU WFD is not the only driver, with renewed interest in the use of stormwater and reuse of wastewater (in part a response to addressing challenges posed by climate change) further emphasising the need for an in-depth understanding of the impact of xenobiotics on both humans and the environment at a global level.

    As a response to this need, leading researchers and practitioners from across Europe came together as part of COST Action 636 ‘Xenobiotics in the Urban Water Cycle’ with the twin aims of assessing the role of xenobiotics in the urban water cycle and developing strategies for minimising their impact on humans and ecosystems. COST Action 636 is focussed around the four key topics: Identification, sources and fluxes; Methods for treatment; Impact assessment and Analytical issues. The articles which appear in this special issue of Water Air and Soil Pollution FOCUS bring together selected papers and discussions which took place in association with the first of these themes, Identification, sources and fluxes, but also broadens its remit to include papers related to the implications of recent research findings as well as a consideration of possible mitigation strategies.

    As co-editors of this volume, we are delighted to bring together papers from contributors working throughout Europe on a variety of aspects relating to xenobiotics, reflecting both a diversity of country-specific as well as more pan-European research concerns, priorities and findings. We would like to thank both authors and reviewers for their contributions to this special volume, and gratefully acknowledge the financial support of COST Action 636, of which this special volume is an output.

  • 63.
    Sørud, Mai
    et al.
    Krüger Veolia Water Technologies, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Katrine
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Skau Damskier, Sophie
    Nordvand A/S, Denmark.
    Torpenholt Jørgensen, Alex
    Krüger Veolia Water Technologies, Denmark.
    Fjendbo Petersen, Mette
    Krüger Veolia Water Technologies, Denmark.
    Kofoed Rasmussen, Lone
    Gladsaxe kommune, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    DEMFIL - treatment of stormwater for recreational use2013In: Proceedings of the 13th Nordic Wastewater Conference, Malmö: Svenskt Vatten , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decoupling of stormwater (road runoff) in a residential area has been implemented in order to reduce flooding and to increase the hydraulic capacity of a lake with a high recreational value. The object here was to evaluate a disc filter technology in combination with a green polymer for flocculation for its feasibility of particle removal. Secondary, the particulate pollution in the separate road runoff should be assessed.The road runoff was found not to be highly contaminated with particle pollution, here measured as turbidity and total suspended solids (TSS). The particles were generally small (< 10 μm) and negatively charged. The disc filtration was hampered during the winter season and by the large fraction of small particles, but supplementing it with flocculation increased the removal efficiencies. The inlet particle concentrations (mg/L) affected the removal efficiencies, and events with inlet concentrations < 10 mg TSS/L or FNU had no statistically significant removal of the particle pollution whereas the events with the highest concentrations yielded among the highest removal efficiencies. The green polymer is as efficient as previously tested commercial coagulant/ flocculent and the disc technology is promising but need to be further tested with higher hydraulic loadings.

  • 64.
    Vezzaro, Luca
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Ledin, Anna
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Dynamic stormwater treatment unit model for micropollutants (STUMP) based on substance inherent properties2010In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 622-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling the removal of micropollutants (MPs) in stormwater treatment systems is essential in a context that is characterized by a general lack of measurements. This paper presents an innovative dynamic model for the prediction of the removal of MPs in stormwater treatment systems (Stormwater Treatment Unit model for Micro Pollutants—STUMP). The model, based on a conceptual model of two-compartment (water and sediment) serial Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactors (CSTRs), can predict the fate of MPs based on their inherent properties, which are often the only information available regarding this kind of substances. The flexible structure of the model can be applied to a wide range of treatment units and substances. Based on the most relevant removal processes (settling, volatilization, sorption, biodegradation, and abiotic degradation), the model allows the dynamic simulation of the MP behaviour in the different compartments of stormwater treatment systems. The model was tested for heavy metals (copper and zinc) and organic substances (benzene and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate). The results show that volatilization plays a big role for removal of benzene while the removal of substances with high sorption capacity is mainly driven by settling. The model was proven to be able to predict the importance of the various fate processes for selected substances with different inherent properties. A thorough assessment of the influence of the various fate process parameters will allow a reliable assessment of the treatment performances for a wide range of MPs.

  • 65.
    Vezzaro, Luca
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Ledin, Anna
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Modelling the fate of organic micropollutants in stormwater ponds2011In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 409, no 13, p. 2597-2606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban water managers need to estimate the potential removal of organic micropollutants (MP) in stormwater treatment systems to support MP pollution control strategies. This study documents how the potential removal of organic MP in stormwater treatment systems can be quantified by using multimedia models. The fate of four different MP in a stormwater retention pond was simulated by applying two steady-state multimedia fate models (EPI Suite and SimpleBox) commonly applied in chemical risk assessment and a dynamic multimedia fate model (Stormwater Treatment Unit Model for Micro Pollutants — STUMP). The four simulated organic stormwater MP (iodopropynyl butylcarbamate — IPBC, benzene, glyphosate and pyrene) were selected according to their different urban sources and environmental fate. This ensures that the results can be extended to other relevant stormwater pollutants. All three models use substance inherent properties to calculate MP fate but differ in their ability to represent the small physical scale and high temporal variability of stormwater treatment systems. Therefore the three models generate different results. A Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) highlighted that settling/resuspension of particulate matter was themost sensitive process for the dynamic model. The uncertainty of the estimated MP fluxes can be reduced by calibrating the dynamic model against total suspended solids data. This reduction in uncertainty was more significant for the substances with strong tendency to sorb, i.e. glyphosate and pyrene and less significant for substances with a smaller tendency to sorb, i.e. IPBC and benzene. The results provide support to the elaboration of MP pollution control strategies by limiting the need for extensive and complex monitoring campaigns targeting the wide range of specific organic MP found in stormwater runoff.

  • 66.
    Vezzaro, Luca
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Ledin, Anna
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Quantification of uncertainty in modelled partitioning and removal of heavy metals (Cu, Zn) in a stormwater retention pond and a biofilter2012In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 46, no 20, p. 6891-6903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategies for reduction of micropollutant (MP) discharges from stormwater drainage systems require accurate estimation of the potential MP removal in stormwater treatment systems. However, the high uncertainty commonly affecting stormwater runoff quality modelling also influences stormwater treatment models. This study identified the major sources of uncertainty when estimating the removal of copper and zinc in a retention pond and a biofilter by using a conceptual dynamic model which estimates MP partitioning between the dissolved and particulate phases as well as environmental fate based on substance-inherent properties. The two systems differ in their main removal processes (settling and filtration/sorption, respectively) and in the time resolution of the available measurements (composite samples and pollutographs). The most sensitive model factors, identified by using Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA), were related to the physical characteristics of the simulated systems (flow and water losses) and to the fate processes related to Total Suspended Solids (TSS). The model prediction bounds were estimated by using the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) technique. Composite samples and pollutographs produced similar prediction bounds for the pond and the biofilter, suggesting a limited influence of the temporal resolution of samples on the model prediction bounds. GLUE highlighted model structural uncertainty when modelling the biofilter, due to disregard of plant-driven evapotranspiration, underestimation of sorption and neglect of oversaturation with respect to minerals/salts. The results of this study however illustrate the potential for the application of conceptual dynamic fate models base on substanceinherent properties, in combination with available datasets and statistical methods, to estimate the MP removal in different stormwater treatment systems and compare with environmental quality standards targeting the dissolved MP fraction.

12 51 - 66 of 66
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf