lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 76 of 76
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    The Health Guru: Masculinity and Fitness Coaching in the Blogosphere2013In: Journal of Men's Studies, ISSN 1060-8265, E-ISSN 1933-0251, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a close study of blogs, where male fitness experts share their expertise, this article analyses how masculinity are framed within the Internet-mediated context of the fitness culture. This is done against the background of Connell's theory of masculinity, and recent critiques of the concept of hegemony. Through an in-depth analysis of three blogs, we get a complex and contradictory image of the different forms of masculinity portrayed in these blogs and in fitness culture at large. The texts and imagery on the blogs clearly exceeds the criteria/limits of traits and norms traditionally considered male or female. In doing so, the may contribute to an increased acceptance for, for example, gay identities and other submissive masculinities.

  • 52.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    The new fitness geography: the globalisation of Japanese gym and fitness culture2017In: Leisure Studies, ISSN 0261-4367, E-ISSN 1466-4496, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 383-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a minor case study of the local fitness culture scene in Tokyo, Japan, this exploratory and qualitative article aims to discuss and analyse the consequences of globalisation of fitness culture. The article focuses particularly on how fitness culture is negotiated in Japanese society – at a national, local and subjective level, and in relation to attempts to uniformly rationalise and standardise gym and fitness culture. The results indicate that the fitness geography is changing, and through the establishment of a globalised fitness culture, Japanese youth are following in the footsteps of many other countries. However, this does not mean that we are witnessing a homogenisation process, or a completely McDonaldised version of fitness culture in Japan. Instead, this cultural phenomenon is shaped and formed in particular ways, pointing towards certain strong national sentiments concerning body ideals, views on gender and exercise and relaxation. For example, the cuteness ideal has a strong influence on the way young women talk about and perceive body ideals and corporeal performances in Japan.

  • 53.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Triathlon Bodies in Motion: Reconceptualizing Feelings of Pain, Nausea and Disgust in the Ironman Triathlon2019In: Body & Society, ISSN 1357-034X, E-ISSN 1460-3632, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 119-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the physical expressions and intensity of embodiment that occur in the Ironman Triathlon. More specifically, the study investigates the transformational bodily experiences taking place during Ironman competitions. Using an ethnographic approach, a total of 29 Ironman triathletes participated in the study (15 men and 14 women). Theoretically, the article focuses on how triathletes’ bodies ‘move’ between different forms of embodiment. The results show that, in the process of disciplining the body, the athletes reconceptualized feelings of pain, nausea and even disgust, making these emotionally expressive aspects of the corpus into a part of the experience and bending them towards the pleasure of reaching potential divinity. Situated in a long tradition of philosophical and sociological explorations of the transgressing and transcending body, the study interprets and understands the performing body as a site for change and utopian possibilities. Thus the study adds to existing debates on contemporary individuals’ exploration of the existential and corporeal dimensions of modernity.

  • 54.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    (Un)Becoming a Fitness Doper: Negotiating the Meaning of Illicit drug use in a Gym and Fitness Context2019In: Journal of Sport and Social Issues, ISSN 0193-7235, E-ISSN 1552-7638, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread availability of doping and its growing prevalence among fitness groups has contributed greatly to the realization of an emergent public health issue. Emanating from an ethnographic study in Sweden, the purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the processes involved in becoming and "unbecoming" a fitness doping user. The study employs a cultural and sociological perspective as its theoretical framework and discusses how the participating users gradually develop their knowledge about the drugs and how the process of becoming a user is negotiated in relation to ideas and ideals concerning health, gender, and individual freedom and Swedish law. Regarding exit processes, (re)entering into what is perceived to be an ordinary "normal" life was seldom a straightforward process. To understand the complex and sometimes complicated transition processes involved in becoming respectively unbecoming a fitness doper, the results highlight the limitations of using stage models for understanding exit process as heuristic tools. Furthermore, the article argue for the necessity to investigate the negotiations of fitness doping, taking place in the intersection between subcultural affiliations/spaces, doping legislation, and mainstream perceptions of living a "Normal" life. It is argued that processes of (un)becoming a fitness doper are anything but linear and thus need to be understood in relation to sociocultural belonging and ongoing negotiation of the individual's sense of self.

  • 55.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    (Un)Becoming a Fitness Doper.: Negotiating the meaning of illicit drug use in a gym and fitness context2019In: Narrowing paths - transgressive routes: Youth in changing times: new forms of inequality, risk and resistance, Aarhus University, Denmark , 2019, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Danielsson, Tom
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Becoming an Ironman triathlete: Extreme exercise, gender equality and the family puzzle2018In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1351-1363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from a qualitative research approach, this article focuses on Swedish amateur Ironman triathletes and their family life. The purpose of the paper is to investigate how an elite amateur lifestyle is upheld and balanced with the demands of a sustainable family and social life. The results indicate that the process of becoming and staying an Ironman creates tensions in intimate relationships, making it hard to bring the family life puzzle together. Although the participants interviewed often talk about family life in terms of sharing things fairly equally, in terms of gender equity and involved parenthood, this seemingly is not always an easy ideal to fulfil in practice. On a broader cultural level, these findings can thus be contextualized in relation to discourses associated with the gendering of families and functions, and, of course, the gender of sport and performance.

  • 57.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Våldsbejakande extremism och radikalisering: En översikt: [Violent extremism and radicalization: an overview]2018In: Young, Marginalised but not Radicalised: A comparative study of positive approaches to youth radicalisation / [ed] Theo Gavrielides, London: IARS Publications , 2018, p. 152-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the understanding of processes of radicalization and the development of preventive work against violent extremism can be said to be framed by a few specific political decisions that were formative for the policies developed. These are dealt with in the text. Among other things, the result shows that the security discourse and preventive work are often mixed up at the policy level, which has repercussions in research and prevention. One important key to developing the work on security and prevention lies in the need for further knowledge development regarding everything from methods and field studies to policy practices. Apart from providing an account of developments in Sweden, there are also arguments for a more skeptical, reflexive, and critical attitude towards all forms of simplified categorizations of young people, which risks stigmatizing individuals and groups. By starting from a critical and reflexive social education perspective, it will become possible to contribute to understanding and to an analysis of social contexts, risks, and negative spirals. The ambition of trying to predict which individuals will potentially commit crimes of terror represents a dead end. On the other hand, there are possibilities of identifying risk environments, subcultural groups that cultivate extreme opinions, and then to approach these groups in various ways in order to develop effective social pedagogical work and positive and GLM-based trajectories for young people at risk for radicalisation.

  • 58.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Mattsson, Christer
    From subcultures to common culture: Bodybuilders, skinheads and the normalization of the marginal2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium (NYRIS), Youth Moves. Voices, Spaces, Subjectivities. Trollhättan, Sweden, 15-17 june, 2016 / [ed] Emma Sorbring, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using bodybuilding and skinheads/neo-Nazis as two rather diverse examples of subcultures, this study is a theoretical exploration of our understanding of the concept of subculture and common culture. The aim is to explore how the concept of subculture can be used in relation to processes of normalization and marginalisation. The focus is on the historical, symbolic and biographical relation between the subculture and the subcultural response, and socio-political transformations in society and culture. We are interested in understanding the processes in which for example bodybuilding has moved back and forth between a subcultural position and more common fitness culture, over time. As a parallel to this, we are also interested in how subcultures centred on skinheads, neo-Nazis and right-wing extremists influence and are connected to more general political transformations and opinions in contemporary society, blurring the distinction between subculture and common culture. The results indicate a complex relation between subcultures and the mainstreaming of certain values, opinions and practices. Deviance is sometimes, over time, renegotiated within common culture, turned into normality , and whereas extreme parts and contents of subcultures may be toned down in this process, core points and values may be extracted and generalized. Bodybuilding is for example transformed into fitness, but the core values of hard bodies, muscle training, health and asceticism are highly present in fitness culture, as well as in more common and dominant socio-cultural patterns. In a similar vein, the core values and sentiments in skinhead and right-wing subcultures xenophobia and nationalism are today becoming a part of the political culture in many European countries.

  • 59.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Lalander, Philip
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Det statliga kasinot. Mellan myt och verklighet2003Report (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Lalander, Philip
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Mellan idrottslig disciplin och gränslöst supande2007In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 461-480Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Unga kroppar i rörelse: Om ideal och hälsonormer i föreningsidrott och gymkultur2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: Grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Thomas Johansson, Emma Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 338-349Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sverkersson, Ellen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    A new doping demography?: Female PIED users in the context of online communication2019In: International Network of Doping Research, 2019 Conference, WADA’s 20th Anniversary, 22.-23. August 2019, Aarhus University, Denmark: Book of Abstracts, Aarhus University , 2019, p. 8-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationally, WADA, NADOs, and different public health organizations conduct fairly comprehensive antidoping measures. As a consequence, numerous ‘new’ ways to learn about and access these types of drugs have emerged. Different internet communities, for example, have become part of a new self-help culture in which mostly men, can anonymously approach these substances. But times are changing and women are increasingly engaging in drug using practices. Using a netnographic approach, the aim of this study is to describe and analyse how female users of performance and image enhancing drugs (PIED) approach, understand and negotiate their use, and relate it to existing preventative measures. The study will focus on an online community called Flashback, and adopts a constructionist approach, investigating how particular subject positions (identities) and drug use strategies are created within a specific ‘community of practice’. The results show that there is an increasing amount of knowledge that not only targets but is also developed by and for women concerning PIED use. Female users are gradually becoming more integrated into the online doping community. A changing doping demography and the online offer of PEIDs will be a great challenge in the development of future supranational, and online, prevention strategies and anti-doping campaigns.

  • 63.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sverkersson, Ellen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Female Fitness Doping: A new doping demography2019In: Narrowing paths - transgressive routes. Youth in changing times : new forms of inequality, risk and resistance: Nordic Youth Research Symposium (NYRIS) in Aarhus 14 - 16 August 2019, Aarhus University , 2019, p. 22-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationally, WADA and different public health organizations conduct fairly comprehensive antidoping measures. As a consequence, numerous ‘new’ ways to learn about and access these types of drugs have emerged. Different internet communities, for example, have become part of a new self-help culture in which mostly men, can anonymously approach these substances, and discuss their experiences of using them. But times are changing and women are increasingly engaging in drug using practices. Using a netnographic approach, the aim of this study is to describe and analyse how female users of performance and image enhancing drugs (PIED) approach, understand and negotiate their use, and relate it to existing preventative measures. The study will focus on an online community called Flashback, and adopts a constructionist approach, investigating how particular subject positions (identities) and drug use strategies are created within a specific ‘community of practice’. The results show that there is an increasing amount of knowledge that not only targets but is also developed by and for women concerning PIED use. Female users are gradually becoming more integrated into the online doping community. A changing doping demography and the online offer of PEIDs will be a great challenge in the development of future supranational, and online, prevention strategies. 

  • 64.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sverkersson, Ellen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Pumping up the ego: Biographical studies on young people's doping trajectories2019In: IPEDs and Polydrug Use, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Tugetam, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Keeping Death at Bay through Health Negotiation: Older Adults' Understanding of Health and Life within Gym and Fitness Culture2016In: Activities, Adaptation & Aging, ISSN 0192-4788, E-ISSN 1544-4368, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 200-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses older adults’ trajectories leading to membership in a gym, and the ways in which they negotiate their self-understanding, aging, and health in this context. Emanating from an ethnographic study, the arguments are based on a constructionist approach. The results show that older adults’ decision to start going to a gym should be understood in relation to an individualized health care system in Swedish society and as a means of negotiating deteriorating health, retirement, lost body capacity, and the meaning of becoming old. The physical activities carried out and the social relationships developed in these contexts are used to construct an empowered self-understanding prepared to challenge the “stiffness” of the dying body.

  • 66.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Developing a Carer Identity and Negotiating Everyday Life Through Social Networking Sites2017In: Poster presented at: IAGG 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Developing a carer identity and negotiating everyday life through social networking sites: An explorative study on identity constructions in an online Swedish carer community2018In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 2304-2324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overarching reason why carers do not utilise support services is that many people who perform care-giving do not necessarily self-identify as a carer. Understanding the development of carer identities is therefore crucial for the utilisation of different carer-focused health services. This study arose from the European Union-funded INNOVAGE project and aimed to describe how older carers conceptualise and understand their identity as carers on a Swedish online social forum. Theoretically the study adopts a constructionist approach and the method of netnography was applied. The findings reveal that a change in self-perception occurs in the process through which a carer role is acquired. The presence or absence of recognition for the older carers’ capacity, knowledge and life situation is seen as filtered through the needs of the care recipient, making the carer identity into an invisible self. This is not least the case when the identity is constructed in alliance with conceptual and moral obligations found within a marital discourse. Nevertheless, the opportunity for online communication may help to create a virtual space of social recognition through which different experiences attached to caring can be discussed. The significance of online communication is here understood as the possibility it presents for carers to be recognised by other carers. It is a process through which an invisible self can become visible.

  • 68.
    Danielsson, Tom
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    IRONMAN triathlon.: Familjeliv, tidspussel och extremidrott2016In: SVEBI, 16-17 november / [ed] Håkan Larsson, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69. Forss, Cecilia
    et al.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Att äga konversationen: Linnea Claeson om idrott, näthat och motmakt2017In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no September 19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Johansson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Fatherhood in Transition: Masculinity, Identity and Everyday Life2017Book (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Johansson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The Gym and the Beach: Globalization, Situated Bodies, and Australian Fitness2016In: Journal of contemporary ethnography, ISSN 0891-2416, E-ISSN 1552-5414, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 143-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fitness culture is becoming gradually more globalized, both in terms of body ideals, and in terms of body techniques and philosophies of the body. This article discusses the consequences of the globalization of fitness. In particular, the article analyzes the relationship between processes of globalization and how local cultural ideals, gender, and environmental factors may contribute to the shaping of specific local gym and fitness cultures. The empirical material is based on an ethnographic case study in Newcastle, Australia, and includes observations from fitness centers and the local surroundings. In addition, interviews with personal trainers, group fitness instructors, and other professionals operating within the fitness field have been conducted.

    The results show that the construction of a local and national gym and fitness culture to a great extent is influenced by the standardization and globalization of fitness. The fitness industry can be analyzed and understood in terms of a “McDonaldization process.” This understanding, however, does not capture the whole image of Australian fitness. In the narratives and observations, there are also tendencies to individualize and personalize fitness in local ways, for instance, in relation to assets such as the natural environment and somewhat mythic and romanticized perceptions of an authentic Australian lifestyle.

  • 72.
    Johansson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The Web of Loneliness: A Netnographic Study of Narratives of Being Alone in an Online Context2017In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a netnographic and case-study-based approach, this article uses different blogs as data in order to analyse how loneliness is conceptualized and understood. More precisely, the study aims to investigate experiences of loneliness and related themes in the context of online communication. In approaching the nature of loneliness, we have analytically leaned on the theories and some of the most basic assumptions of symbolic interactionism, according to which, social encounters and situations, their qualities and their existence, have a profound impact on emotional life. This study can be read as an archaeology of online loneliness and the findings suggest that the experiences of online loneliness can be categorized in different genres, such as the poetics of loneliness, the diagnostics and self-harm of loneliness, and loneliness and family life. Although loneliness is approached and discussed differently, the bloggers’ estranged relationships to society tie these identified genres of loneliness together. The different genres derive their character, form and social dynamics from the narrators’ struggle and urge to somehow find a way to fit into contemporary society and achieve satisfying social relationships. Furthermore, displaying and presenting the self, and thus becoming the object of other people’s attention and interest, in the context of online communication, can be a profound way of reconnecting to society and hopefully avoiding isolation and marginalization.

  • 73.
    Johansson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Mattsson, Christer
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    From Subcultures to Common Culture: Bodybuilders, Skinheads, and the Normalization of the Marginal2017In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using bodybuilders and skinheads/neo-Nazis as two rather diverse examples of subcultures, the present study theoretically explores our understanding of subculture and common culture. The study aims to explore how the concept of subculture can be used analytically in relation to processes of normalization and marginalization. The focus is on the historical, symbolic, and biographical relation between the subculture, the subcultural response, and sociopolitical transformations in society and culture. We are interested in understanding the processes through which, for example, bodybuilding has moved back and forth, over time, between a subcultural position and a more common fitness culture. In parallel to this, we are also interested in how subcultures centered on skinheads, neo-Nazis, and right-wing extremists influence and are connected to more general political transformations and opinions in contemporary society, blurring the distinction between subculture and common culture. The results indicate a complex relation between subcultures and the mainstreaming of certain values, opinions, and practices.

  • 74. Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sport and Masculinities in Sweden: Performance and the Notion of Gender Equality2020In: The Palgrave Handbook of Masculinity and Sport / [ed] Rory Magrath, Jamie Cleland and Eric Anderson, Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 465-481Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Stenberg, Emma
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ett idrottsvetenskapligt glastak?2016In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no September 9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Tugetam, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Stor potential i gymträning för äldre2015In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fysisk aktivitet på recept istället för läkemedel blir allt vanligare. Äldre personer hänvisas ofta till träning på kommersiella gym. Träningen ger dem både bättre hälsa och nya sociala kontakter. Men mötet med gymkulturen är inte helt friktionsfri.

12 51 - 76 of 76
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf