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  • 1.
    Nordqvist, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. Region Kalmar County, Sweden.
    Lönnbom Svensson, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Brundin, Lars
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden;Linköping university, Sweden.
    Wanby, Pär
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Adherence to risk management guidelines for drugs which cause vitamin D deficiency – big data from the Swedish health system2019In: Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, ISSN 1179-1365, E-ISSN 1179-1365, Vol. 11, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Several medications are known to cause vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this study is to describe vitamin D testing and supplementation in patients using these “risk medications”, thereby assessing adherence to medical guidelines.Patients and methods: A database with electronic health records for the population in a Swedish County (≈240,000 inhabitants) was screened for patients prescribed the pre-defined “risk medications” during a 2-year period (2014–2015). In total, 12,194 patients were prescribed “risk medications” pertaining to one of the three included pharmaceutical groups. Vitamin D testing and concomitant vitamin D supplementation, including differences between the included pharmaceutical groups, was explored by matching personal identification numbers.Results: Corticosteroids were prescribed to 10,003 of the patients, antiepileptic drugs to 1,101, and drugs mainly reducing vitamin D uptake to 864. Two hundred twenty-six patients were prescribed >1 “risk medication”. Seven hundred eighty-seven patients (6.5%) had been tested during the 2-year period. There were no differences regarding testing frequency between groups. Concomitant supplements were prescribed to 3,911 patients (32.1%). It was more common to be prescribed supplements when treated with corticosteroids. Vitamin D supplementation was more common among tested patients in all three groups. Women were tested and supplemented to a higher extent. The mean vitamin D level was 69 nmol/L. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 24.1% of tested patients, while 41.3% had optimal levels. It was less common to be deficient and more common to have optimal levels among patients prescribed corticosteroids.Conclusion: Adherence to medical guidelines comprising testing and supplementation of patients prescribed drugs causing vitamin D deficiency needs improvement in Sweden.

  • 2.
    Skeppstedt, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). The Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Ahltorp, Magnus
    The Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Rzepka, Rafal
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Araki, Kenji
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Application of a topic model visualisation tool to a second language2019In: Book of Abstracts of the CLARIN Annual Conference 2019, Leipzig, Germany, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored adaptions required for applying a topic modelling tool to a language that is very different from the one for which the tool was originally developed. The tool, which enables text analysis on the output of topic modelling, was developed for English, and we here applied it on Japanese texts. As white space is not used for indicating word boundaries in Japanese, the texts had to be pre-tokenised and white space inserted to indicate a token segmentation, before the texts could be imported into the tool. The tool was also extended by the addition of word translations and phonetic readings to support users who are second-language speakers of Japanese.

  • 3.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ardö, Anders
    Automatic classification Using DDC on the Swedish Union Catalogue2019In: European DDC Users Group, EDUG, Annual Meeting 9-10 May 2019: National Library of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Viebke, Andre
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Memeti, Suejb
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Pllana, Sabri
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Abraham, Ajith
    Machine Intelligence Research Labs (MIR Labs), USA.
    CHAOS: A Parallelization Scheme for Training Convolutional Neural Networks on Intel Xeon Phi2019In: Journal of Supercomputing, ISSN 0920-8542, E-ISSN 1573-0484, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 197-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep learning is an important component of big-data analytic tools and intelligent applications, such as, self-driving cars, computer vision, speech recognition, or precision medicine. However, the training process is computationally intensive, and often requires a large amount of time if performed sequentially. Modern parallel computing systems provide the capability to reduce the required training time of deep neural networks.In this paper, we present our parallelization scheme for training convolutional neural networks (CNN) named Controlled Hogwild with Arbitrary Order of Synchronization (CHAOS). Major features of CHAOS include the support for thread and vector parallelism, non-instant updates of weight parameters during back-propagation without a significant delay, and implicit synchronization in arbitrary order. CHAOS is tailored for parallel computing systems that are accelerated with the Intel Xeon Phi. We evaluate our parallelization approach empirically using measurement techniques and performance modeling for various numbers of threads and CNN architectures. Experimental results for the MNIST dataset of handwritten digits using the total number of threads on the Xeon Phi show speedups of up to 103x compared to the execution on one thread of the Xeon Phi, 14x compared to the sequential execution on Intel Xeon E5, and 58x compared to the sequential execution on Intel Core i5.

  • 5.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Charting New Sources of elf Data: A Multi-Genre Corpus Approach2019In: From Data to Evidence in English Language Research / [ed] Carla Suhr, Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 326-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses research that charts new lingua franca English data and broadensthe scope of written elf corpora. We illustrate that, apart from the academic domain,there exist various written genres in non-native contexts in which English is used as asecond language resource alongside native languages. These uncharted data can provideus with new ways of approaching the ongoing globalization of English. The newapproach incorporates a broader perspective on elf than previously, seeing it as onestage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emergingin interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genrecorpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in linguafranca use. It is followed by three case studies investigating quantitative patterns ofongoing change in elf. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angleto lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to elf but also to ongoinggrammatical variability. It shows that the traditional and canonized way of seeing nonnativespeakers/writers is not sufficient, nor is the simplified view of norm dependency of non-native individuals.

  • 6.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Dehkordi, Molood
    Forsman, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Ghorbani, Amineh
    van Weeren, Rene
    de Moor, Tine
    Common paths in long-term institutional dynamics: An analysis of rule changes inBritish and Dutch commons over seven centuries2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Dressler, Danny
    et al.
    AIMO AB, Sweden.
    Liapota, Pavlo
    Softwerk AB, Sweden.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Data Driven Human Movement Assessment2019In: Intelligent Decision Technologies 2019: Proceedings of the 11th KES International Conference on Intelligent Decision Technologies (KES-IDT 2019), Volume 2 / [ed] Ireneusz Czarnowski; Robert Howlett; Lakhmi C. Jain, Springer, 2019, p. 317-327Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality assessment of human movements has many of applications in diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal insufficiencies and high performance sport. We suggest five purely data driven assessment methods for arbitrary human movements using inexpensive 3D sensor technology. We evaluate their accuracy by comparing them against a validated digitalization of a standardized human-expert-based assessment method for deep squats. We suggest the data driven method that shows high agreement with this baseline method, requires little expertise in the human movement and no expertise in the assessment method itself. It allows for an effective and efficient, automatic and quantitative assessment of  arbitrary human movements.

  • 8.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Göransson, Elisabet
    Foka, Anna
    Huvila, Isto
    Digital humanities in Sweden and its infrastructure: Status quo and the sine qua non2019In: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, ISSN 2055-7671, E-ISSN 2055-768X, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article offers a state-of-the-art overview of a number of Digital Humanities (DH) initiatives that have emerged in Sweden over the past decade. We identify two major developments that seem to be taking place within DH, with a specific focus on the infrastructural aspects of the development: (1) a strive to open up and broaden the research output and (2) multi-disciplinary collaboration and its effects. The two major components accentuate the new infrastructural patterns that are developing and the challenges these infer on universities. While current research is at large multi-disciplinary, developing infrastructures also enable the move towards post-disciplinarity, bringing the universities closer to the surrounding society. At five universities in Sweden, individual-sited infrastructures supporting DH research have been built today. They are complemented by national and international infrastructures, thus supporting developments and tackling some of the major challenges. In the article, the relations between individual disciplines, the question of multi- and post-disciplinarity, and the field of Digital Humanities are discussed, while stressing the factors necessary—sine qua non—for a fruitful development of the scholarly infrastructures.

  • 9.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Forsman, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    de Moor, Tine
    Ghorbani, Amineh
    Dehkordi, Molood
    van Weeren, Rene
    Eco-evolutionary perspectives on institutional dynamics of historical commonsadvice about sustainable utilization of shared resources2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Efficient Dynamic Time Warping for Big Data Streams2019In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Big Data (Big Data '18): Workshop on Real-time & Stream Analytics in Big Data & Stream Data Management / [ed] Abe, N; Liu, H; Pu, C; Hu, X; Ahmed, N; Qiao, M; Song, Y; Kossmann, D; Liu, B; Lee, K; Tang, J; He, J; Saltz, J, IEEE, 2019, p. 2924-2929Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many common data analysis and machine learning algorithms for time series, such as classification, clustering, or dimensionality reduction, require a distance measurement between pairs of time series in order to determine their similarity. A variety of measures can be found in the literature, each with their own strengths and weaknesses, but the Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) distance measure has occupied an important place since its early applications for the analysis and recognition of spoken word. The main disadvantage of the DTW algorithm is, however, its quadratic time and space complexity, which limits its practical use to relatively small time series. This issue is even more problematic when dealing with streaming time series that are continuously updated, since the analysis must be re-executed regularly and with strict running time constraints. In this paper, we describe enhancements to the DTW algorithm that allow it to be used efficiently in a streaming scenario by supporting an append operation for new time steps with a linear complexity when an exact, error-free DTW is needed, and even better performance when either a Sakoe-Chiba band is used, or when a sliding window is the desired range for the data. Our experiments with one synthetic and four natural data sets have shown that it outperforms other DTW implementations and the potential errors are, in general, much lower than another state-of-the-art approximated DTW technique.

  • 11.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Loxbo, Karl
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Experimental evidence of a bandwagon effect on voting2019In: 6th International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS), 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social influence and conformity have been thoroughly studied by social psychologists, leading political scientist to the postulation of the bandwagon effect. However, despite its relevance, the bandwagon effect, claiming that seeing pre-election polls makes votes for majority options more likely, has not been properly tested for political voting and evidence regarding this effect is mixed. Experiments either were ran in very abstract contexts only vaguely representing political voting, or only testing the effect of polls on opinions or hypothetical votes . We present an unique experimental design with more realism than previous designs, keeping the experimental control needed to make causal claims.

    We tested in an online experiment with 1115 participants from the US how votes change when pre-election polls are shown. Our experimental design is unique in that the votes of the participants have real-world consequences within their electoral area (the US), empower actual political organizations falling on a left-right spectrum, and the votes are on issues currently debated in US politics (firearms, abortion, immigration, and environment). Per issue participants chose between three different charities, representing different positions within the political spectrum. As a result of the experiment 1200$ were distributed across these charities as suggested by the vote.

    In line with the bandwagon-effect, we find clear evidence that seeing poll results makes votes for majority opinion more likely. After seeing the surveys, majority opinions received an extra ~7% of votes. In our experiment this effect did not depend on the electoral system and was robust against controlling for the gender and age of voters and the self-assessment on a left-right spectrum. However, we find evidence that under extreme-polarization (where moderate position are the least popular option) the bandwagon-effect is much weaker.

  • 12.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Friedrich Schiller University, Germany.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Experimental evidence of an attitude-behaviour gap forclimate change mitigation in high cost conditions2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An established research result is that people's environmental attitudes only loosely translate into actions effectively reducing their environmental impact, something known as the attitude-behaviour gap. On the other hand, correct information and environmental education are often considered a key to promote sustainability, which raises the question of when attitudes can actually work as a lever to promote environmental objectives and, conversely, when other factors have a better chance to succeed. To answer these questions, we tested the effect of environmental attitudes in an online experiment with real money at stake and real-world climate mitigation consequences. We found that environmental attitudes mainly affected behaviour in a low cost situation, while their effect was reduced when the stakes were higher. This finding is consistent with the low cost hypothesis of environmental behaviour and has important consequences for the shaping of more effective climate policies in a democratic context.

  • 13.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Friedrich Schiller University, Germany.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Experimental evidence of an environmental attitude-behavior gap in high-cost situations2019In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 166, p. 1-12, article id 106434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    So far, there has been mixed evidence in the literature regarding the relationship between environmental attitudes and actual `green' actions, something known as the attitude-behavior gap. This raises the question of when attitudes can actually work as a lever to promote environmental objectives, such as climate change mitigation, and, conversely, when other factors would be more effective. This paper presents an online experiment with real money at stake and real-world consequences designed to test the effect of environmental attitudes on behavior under various conditions. We found that environmental attitudes affected behavior only in low-cost situations. This finding is consistent with the low-cost hypothesis of environmental behavior postulating that concerned individuals will undertake low-cost actions in order to reduce the cognitive dissonance  between their attitudes and rational realization of the environmental impact of their behavior but avoid higher-cost actions despite their greater potential as far as environmental protection. This finding has important consequences for the design of more effective climate policies in a democratic context as it puts limits on what can be achieved by raising environmental concern alone.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-09-01 08:00
  • 14.
    Farjam, Mike
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Experimental evidence of the bandwagon effect on voting2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Natalini, Davide
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, UK.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Jones, Aled Wynne
    Anglia Ruskin University, UK.
    Global food security and food riots: an agent-based modelling approach2019In: Food Security, ISSN 1876-4517, E-ISSN 1876-4525, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1153-1173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to negative consequences of climate change for agriculture and food production shocks affecting different areas of the world, the past two decades saw the conditions of global food security increasingly worsen. This has resulted in negative consequences for the world economy, partly causing international food price spikes and social upheavals. In this paper we present statistical findings along with a preliminary version of an original agent-based model called the Dawe Global Security Model that simulates the global food market and the political fragility of countries. The model simulates the effects of food insecurity on international food prices and how these, coupled with national political fragility and international food trade can, in turn, increase the probability of food riots in countries. The agents in the model are the 213 countries of the world whose characteristics reflect empirical data and the international trade of food is also simulated based on real trade partnerships and data. The model has been informed, calibrated and validated using real data and the results of these procedures are presented in the paper. To further test the model we also present the model’s forecasts for the near future in terms of food prices and incidence of food riots. The Dawe Global Security Model can be used to test scenarios on the evolution of shocks to global food production and analyse consequences for food riots. Further developments of the model can include national responses to food crises to investigate how countries can influence the spread of global food crises.

  • 16.
    Pohl, Margit
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Human Factors and Multilayer Networks2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysts of specific application domains, such as experts in systems biology or social scientists, are often interested to visually analyze a number of different network structures in conjunction, for example by using various visual structures of so-called multilayer networks. From the perspective of the human analyst, a sufficient perception and, consequently, a good understanding of those visual representations of multilayer networks is a non-trivial and often challenging task. Despite this practical importance and the clearly interesting visualization challenges, only few evaluation studies exist that investigate usability and cognitive issues of complex networks or, more specifically, multilayer networks. In this position paper, we address two main goals. On the one hand, we discuss existing studies from the fields of human-computer interaction and cognitive psychology that could inform the designers of multilayer network visualization in the future. On the other hand, we formulate first tentative recommendations for the design of multilayer networks, identify open issues in this context, and clarify possible future directions of research.

  • 17.
    Hönel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Importance and Aptitude of Source code Density for Commit Classification into Maintenance Activities2019In: QRS 2019 Proceedings / [ed] Dr. David Shepherd, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commit classification, the automatic classification of the purpose of changes to software, can support the understanding and quality improvement of software and its development process. We introduce code density of a commit, a measure of the net size of a commit, as a novel feature and study how well it is suited to determine the purpose of a change. We also compare the accuracy of code-density-based classifications with existing size-based classifications. By applying standard classification models, we demonstrate the significance of code density for the accuracy of commit classification. We achieve up to 89% accuracy and a Kappa of 0.82 for the cross-project commit classification where the model is trained on one project and applied to other projects. Such highly accurate classification of the purpose of software changes helps to improve the confidence in software (process) quality analyses exploiting this classification information.

  • 18.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Friedrich Schiller University, Germany.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Investing into climate change mitigation despite the risk of failure2019In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 154, no 3-4, p. 453-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to convince both policy makers and the general public to engage in climate change mitigation activities, it is crucial to communicate the inherent risks in an effective way. Due to the complexity of the system, mitigation activities cannot completely rule out the possibility of the climate reaching a dangerous tipping point but can only reduce it to some unavoidable residual risk level. We present an online experiment based on a sample of US citizens and designed to improve our understanding of how the presence of such residual risk affects the willingness to invest into climate change mitigation. We found that, far from reducing them, the presence of residual risk actually increases investments into mitigation activities. This result suggests that scientists and policy makers should consider being more transparent about communicating the residual risks entailed by such initiatives.

  • 19. Ghorbani, Amineh
    et al.
    Dehkordi, Molood
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Farjam, Mike
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    De Moor, Tine
    van Weeren, René
    Long-term Dynamics of Institutions: An empirically tested model2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ulan, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Multi-criteria Ranking Based on Joint Distributions: A Tool to Support Decision Making2019In: Perspectives in Business Informatics Research.BIR 2019: 18th International Conference on Business Informatics Research / [ed] Pańkowska M., Sandkuhl K, Springer, 2019, p. 74-88Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound assessment and ranking of alternatives are fundamental to effective decision making. Creating an overall ranking is not trivial if there are multiple criteria, and none of the alternatives is the best according to all criteria. To address this challenge, we propose an approach that aggregates criteria scores based on their joint (probability) distribution and obtains the ranking as a weighted product of these scores. We evaluate our approach in a real-world use case based on a funding allocation problem and compare it with the traditional weighted sum aggregation model. The results show that the approaches assign similar ranks, while our approach is more interpretable and sensitive.

  • 21.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Nonetheless or all the more? Investing into climate change mitigation policies despitea risk of failure2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Lincke, Alisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Rall, Eduard
    AIMO AB.
    On the Agreement of Commodity 3D Cameras2019In: 23rd International Conference on Image Processing, Computer Vision, & Pattern Recognition (IPCV'19: July 29 - August 1, 2019, USA), CSREA Press, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of commodity 3D sensor technol- ogy has, amongst other things, enabled the efficient and effective assessment of human movements. Machine learning approaches do not rely manual definitions of gold standards for each new movement. However, to train models for the automated assessments of a new movement they still need a lot of data that map recorded movements to expert judg- ments. As camera technology changes, this training needs to be repeated if a new camera does not agree with the old one. The present paper presents an inexpensive method to check the agreement of cameras, which, in turn, would allow for a safe reuse of trained models regardless of the cameras. We apply the method to the Kinect, Astra Mini, and Real Sense cameras. The results show that these cameras do not agree and that the models cannot be reused without an unacceptable decay in accuracy. However, the suggested method works independent of movements and cameras and could potentially save effort when integrating new cameras in an existing assessment environment.

  • 23.
    Farjam, Mike
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    On whom would I want to depend; humans or computers?2019In: Journal of Economic Psychology, ISSN 0167-4870, E-ISSN 1872-7719, Vol. 72, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study in a laboratory experiment whether humans prefer to depend on decisions of others (Human-Driven Uncertainty) or states generated by a computer (Computerized Uncertainty). The experimental design introduced in this paper is unique in that it introduces Human-Driven Uncertainty such that it does not derive from a strategic context. In our experiment, Human-Driven Uncertainty derives from decisions, which were taken in a morally neutral context and in ignorance of externalities that the decisions may have on others. Our results indicate that even without strategic interaction and moral elements humans prefer Computerized to Human-Driven Uncertainty. This holds even when the distribution of outcomes under both types of uncertainty is identical. From a methodological point of view, the findings shed a critical light on behavioral research in which it is common practice to control for strategic uncertainty by comparing interaction with an artificial agent with a known strategy to interaction with humans. Outside the laboratory, our results suggest that whenever dependence on humans is changed to dependence on computers and other kinds of “artificial” decision makers, preferences with regard to these dependencies may change too.

  • 24.
    Kopetschny, Chris
    et al.
    Dezember IT GmbH, Germany .
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Optimization of Software Estimation Models2019In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Software Technologies - Volume 1, SciTePress, 2019, p. 141-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In software engineering, estimations are frequently used to determine expected but yet unknown properties of software development processes or the developed systems, such as costs, time, number of developers, efforts, sizes, and complexities. Plenty of estimation models exist, but it is hard to compare and improve them as software technologies evolve quickly. We suggest an approach to estimation model design and automated optimization allowing for model comparison and improvement based on commonly collected data points. This way, the approach simplifies model optimization and selection. It contributes to a convergence of existing estimation models to meet contemporary software technology practices and provide a possibility for selecting the most appropriate ones.

  • 25.
    Pardalis, Georgios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Mainali, Brijesh
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Swedish House Owners’ Intentions Towards Renovations: Is there a Market for One-Stop-Shop?2019In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 1-16, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine factors aecting owners’ intention for renovation of their detached houses. Furthermore, we analyze their interest in choosing a one-stop-shop (OSS) service for the renovation, even though such a concept is not yet established in Sweden, but emerging in other parts of Europe. Our study is based on responses to an online questionnaire survey of 971 house owners residing in Kronoberg Region in Sweden. About 76% of the respondents intend to renovate in the near future, with approximately 71% of them preferring to renovate individual components of their dwelling and 5% to renovate their whole house in steps. House owners of younger age, higher income, higher education, and those with an interest for environmental issues, were the ones most interested in physical renovations, which improves energy efficiency of the building. For those house owners, one-stop-shop can facilitate the decision-making process, and help them to choose those measures that will improve their quality of life. Approximately 20% of the respondents had a positive view towards an one-stop-shop, which is an indicator that market for such a service exists. Parameters such as quality of work, cost and energy savings and specification of measures to be adopted are the key for the promotion of one-stop-shop. Additionally, house owners want to have a certain level of involvement in the selection of actors performing the renovation. Moreover, financial incentives, e.g., loans, do not play a significant role for the selection of one-stop-shop, but act as complementary motive for house owners.

  • 26.
    Kucher, Kostiantyn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Text Visualization Revisited: The State of the Field in 20192019In: Posters of the 21th EG/VGTC Conference on Visualization (EuroVis '19) / [ed] João M. Pereira and Renata G. Raidou, Eurographics - European Association for Computer Graphics, 2019, p. 29-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Text and document data visualization is an important research field within information visualization and visual analytics with multiple application domains including digital humanities and social media, for instance. During the past five years, we have been collecting text visualization techniques described in peer-reviewed literature, categorizing them according to a detailed categorization schema, and providing the resulting manually curated collection in an online survey browser. In this poster paper, we present the updated results of analyses of this data set as of spring 2019. Compared to the recent surveys and meta-analyses that mainly focus on particular aspects and problems related to text visualization, our results provide an overview of the current state of the text visualization field and the respective research community in general.

  • 27.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Grimaldo, Francisco
    Univ Valencia, Spain.
    Lopez-Inesta, Emilia
    Univ Valencia, Spain.
    Mehmani, Bahar
    Elsevier,Netherlands.
    Squazzoni, Flaminio
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    The effect of publishing peer review reports on referee behavior in five scholarly journals2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase transparency in science, some scholarly journals are publishing peer review reports. But it is unclear how this practice affects the peer review process. Here, we examine the effect of publishing peer review reports on referee behavior in five scholarly journals involved in a pilot study at Elsevier. By considering 9,220 submissions and 18,525 reviews from 2010 to 2017, we measured changes both before and during the pilot and found that publishing reports did not significantly compromise referees' willingness to review, recommendations, or turn-around times. Younger and non-academic scholars were more willing to accept to review and provided more positive and objective recommendations. Male referees tended to write more constructive reports during the pilot. Only 8.1% of referees agreed to reveal their identity in the published report. These findings suggest that open peer review does not compromise the process, at least when referees are able to protect their anonymity.

  • 28. Dehkordi, Molood
    et al.
    Ghorbani, Amineh
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    The role of wealth inequality on collective action formanagement of common pool resource2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    DISA.
    Nordqvist, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics. DISA.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Towards a language independent Twitter bot detector2019In: Proceedings of 4th Conference of The Association Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries: Copenhagen, March 6-8 2019 / [ed] Navarretta Costanza et al., Copenhagen: Digital Humanities in the Nordic countries , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes our work in developing an application that recognizes automatically generated tweets. The objective of this machine learning application is to increase data accuracy in sociolinguistic studies that utilize Twitter by reducing skewed sampling and inaccuracies in linguistic data. Most previous machine learning attempts to exclude bot material have been language dependent since they make use of monolingual Twitter text in their training phase. In this paper, we present a language independent approach which classifies each single tweet to be either autogenerated (AGT) or human-generated (HGT). We define an AGT as a tweet where all or parts of the natural language content is generated automatically by a bot or other type of program. In other words, while AGT/HGT refer to an individual message, the term bot refers to non-personal and automated accounts that post content to online social networks. Our approach classifies a tweet using only metadata that comes with every tweet, and we utilize those metadata parameters that are both language and country independent. The empirical part shows good success rates. Using a bilingual training set of Finnish and Swedish tweets, we correctly classified about 98.2% of all tweets in a test set using a third language (English).

  • 30.
    Espadoto, Mateus
    et al.
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Hirata, Nina S. T.
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Telea, Alexandru C.
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Towards a Quantitative Survey of Dimension Reduction Techniques2019In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimensionality reduction methods, also known as projections, are frequently used in multidimensional data exploration in machine learning, data science, and information visualization. Tens of such techniques have been proposed, aiming to address a wide set of requirements, such as ability to show the high-dimensional data structure, distance or neighborhood preservation, computational scalability, stability to data noise and/or outliers, and practical ease of use. However, it is far from clear for practitioners how to choose the best technique for a given use context. We present a survey of a wide body of projection techniques that helps answering this question. For this, we characterize the input data space, projection techniques, and the quality of projections, by several quantitative metrics. We sample these three spaces according to these metrics, aiming at good coverage with bounded effort. We describe our measurements and outline observed dependencies of the measured variables. Based on these results, we draw several conclusions that help comparing projection techniques, explain their results for different types of data, and ultimately help practitioners when choosing a projection for a given context. Our methodology, datasets, projection implementations, metrics, visualizations, and results are publicly open, so interested stakeholders can examine and/or extend this benchmark.

  • 31.
    Dressler, Danny
    et al.
    AIMO AB, Sweden.
    Liapota, Pavlo
    Softwerk AB, Sweden.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Towards an automated assessment of musculoskeletal insufficiencies2019In: Intelligent Decision Technologies 2019: Proceedings of the 11th KES International Conference on Intelligent Decision Technologies (KES-IDT 2019), Volume 1 / [ed] Ireneusz Czarnowski; Robert Howlett; Lakhmi C. Jain, Springer, 2019, p. 251-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper suggests a quantitative assessment of human movements using inexpensive 3D sensor technology and evaluates its accuracy by comparing it with human expert assessments. The two assessment methods show a high agreement. To achieve this, a novel sequence alignment algorithm was developed that works for arbitrary time series.

  • 32.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Liapota, Pavlo
    Softwerk AB.
    Lincke, Alisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Variants of Dynamic Time Warping and their Performance in Human Movement Assessment2019In: 21st International Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ICAI'19: July 29 - August 1, 2019, las Vegas, USA), CSREA Press, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of commodity 3D sensor technology enabled, amongst other things, the efficient and effective assessment of human movements. Statistical and machine learning approaches map recorded movement instances to expert scores to train models for the automated assessment of new movements. However, there are many variations in selecting the approaches and setting the parameters for achieving good performance, i.e., high scoring accuracy and low response time. The present paper researches the design space and the impact of sequence alignment on accuracy and response time. More specifically, we introduce variants of Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) for aligning the phases of slow and fast movement instances and assess their effect on the scoring accuracy and response time. Results show that an automated stripping of leading and trailing frames not belonging to the movement (using one DTW variant) followed by an alignment of selected frames in the movements (based on another DTW variant) outperforms the original DTW and other suggested variants thereof. Since these results are independent of the selected learning approach and do not rely on the movement specifics, the results can help improving the performance of automated human movement assessment, in general.

  • 33.
    Skeppstedt, Maria
    et al.
    The Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Rzepka, Rafal
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Araki, Kenji
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Visualising and Evaluating the Effects of Combining Active Learning with Word Embedding Features2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tool that enables the use of active learning, as well as the incorporation of word embeddings, was evaluated for its ability to decrease the training data set size required for a named entity recognition model. Uncertainty-based active learning and the use of word embeddings led to very large performance improvements on small data sets for the entity categories PERSON and LOCATION. In contrast, the embedding features used were shown to be unsuitable for detecting entities belonging to the ORGANISATION category. The tool was also extended with functionality for visualising the usefulness of the active learning process and of the word embeddings used. The visualisations provided were able to indicate the performance differences between the entities, as well as differences with regards to usefulness of the embedding features.

  • 34.
    Hönel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    A changeset-based approach to assess source code density and developer efficacy2018In: ICSE '18 Proceedings of the 40th International Conference on Software Engineering: Companion Proceeedings, IEEE , 2018, p. 220-221Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The productivity of a (team of) developer(s) can be expressed as a ratio between effort and delivered functionality. Several different estimation models have been proposed. These are based on statistical analysis of real development projects; their accuracy depends on the number and the precision of data points. We propose a data-driven method to automate the generation of precise data points. Functionality is proportional to the code size and Lines of Code (LoC) is a fundamental metric of code size. However, code size and LoC are not well defined as they could include or exclude lines that do not affect the delivered functionality. We present a new approach to measure the density of code in software repositories. We demonstrate how the accuracy of development time spent in relation to delivered code can be improved when basing it on net-instead of the gross-size measurements. We validated our tool by studying ca. 1,650 open-source software projects.

  • 35.
    Memeti, Suejb
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Pllana, Sabri
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    A machine learning approach for accelerating DNA sequence analysis2018In: The international journal of high performance computing applications, ISSN 1094-3420, E-ISSN 1741-2846, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 363-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA sequence analysis is a data and computationally intensive problem and therefore demands suitable parallel computing resources and algorithms. In this paper, we describe an optimized approach for DNA sequence analysis on a heterogeneous platform that is accelerated with the Intel Xeon Phi. Such platforms commonly comprise one or two general purpose host central processing units (CPUs) and one or more Xeon Phi devices. We present a parallel algorithm that shares the work of DNA sequence analysis between the host CPUs and the Xeon Phi device to reduce the overall analysis time. For automatic worksharing we use a supervised machine learning approach, which predicts the performance of DNA sequence analysis on the host and device and accordingly maps fractions of the DNA sequence to the host and device. We evaluate our approach empirically using real-world DNA segments for human and various animals on a heterogeneous platform that comprises two 12-core Intel Xeon E5 CPUs and an Intel Xeon Phi 7120P device with 61 cores.

  • 36.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Tshering, Gaki
    Örebro University.
    Fogelberg, Martin
    Örebro University.
    Jusufi, Ilir
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro University.
    Klein, Gunnar O.
    Örebro University.
    An interface for IoT: feeding back health-related data to Parkinson's disease patients2018In: Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks, E-ISSN 2224-2708, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-16, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a user-centered design (UCD) process of an interface for Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients for helping them to better manage their symptoms. The interface is designed to visualize symptom and medication information, collected by an Internet of Things (IoT)-based system, which will consist of a smartphone, electronic dosing device, wrist sensor and a bed sensor. In our work, the focus is on measuring data related to some of the main health-related quality of life aspects such as motor function, sleep, medication compliance, meal intake timing in relation to medication intake, and physical exercise. A mock-up demonstrator for the interface was developed using UCD methodology in collaboration with PD patients. The research work was performed as an iterative design and evaluation process based on interviews and observations with 11 PD patients. Additional usability evaluations were conducted with three information visualization experts. Contributions include a list of requirements for the interface, results evaluating the performance of the patients when using the demonstrator during task-based evaluation sessions as well as opinions of the experts. The list of requirements included ability of the patients to track an ideal day, so they could repeat certain activities in the future as well as determine how the scores are related to each other. The patients found the visualizations as clear and easy to understand and could successfully perform the tasks. The evaluation with experts showed that the visualizations are in line with the current standards and guidelines for the intended group of users. In conclusion, the results from this work indicate that the proposed system can be considered as a tool for assisting patients in better management of the disease by giving them insights on their own aggregated symptom and medication information. However, the actual effects of providing such feedback to patients on their health-related quality of life should be investigated in a clinical trial.

  • 37.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). KU Leuven, Austria.
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Frejdestedt, Frans
    Ericsson AB.
    Thornadtsson, Johan
    Sigma Technology.
    Hulth, Anna-Karin
    Sigma Technology.
    Applying Self-Adaptation to Automate the Management of Online Documentation of Telecom Systems2018In: 14th International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE): Munich, Germany, August 20-24, 2018, IEEE, 2018, p. 1375-1380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering software-intensive systems, such as production systems, is complex as these systems are subject to various types of changes that are often difficult to anticipate before deployment. Tackling this complexity requires joint expertise from different backgrounds. In this paper we focus on the problem of maintaining online technical documentation of telecom systems. In the context of continuous deployment and ever-changing user needs, high quality of the documentation of such products is in a key concern of users. To tackle this problem, different experts worked together equipping the online documentation system with a feedback loop. This feedback loop tracks changes in the system and its context and automatically adapts the documentation accordingly. The results demonstrate that this self-adaptation approach offers a viable solution to tackle the maintainability problem of online documentation of telecom systems.

  • 38.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ardö, Anders
    Lund University.
    Automatic classification using DDC on the Swedish Union Catalogue2018In: Proceedings of the 18th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS 2018) Workshop, Porto, Portugal, September 13, 2018 / [ed] Philipp Mayr, Douglas Tudhope, Joseph Busch, Koraljka Golub, Marjorie Hlava & Marcia Zeng, CEUR-WS.org , 2018, p. 4-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With more and more digital collections of various information re- sources becoming available, also increasing is the challenge of assigning subject index terms and classes from quality knowledge organization systems. While the ultimate purpose is to understand the value of automatically produced Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) classes for Swedish digital collections, the paper aims to evaluate the performance of two machine learning algorithms for Swe- dish catalogue records from the Swedish union catalogue (LIBRIS). The algo- rithms are tested on the top three hierarchical levels of the DDC. Based on a data set of 143,838 records, evaluation shows that Support Vector Machine with linear kernel outperforms Multinomial Naïve Bayes algorithm. Also, using keywords or combining titles and keywords gives better results than using only titles as input. The class imbalance where many DDC classes only have few records greatly affects classification performance: 81.37% accuracy on the training set is achieved when at least 1,000 records per class are available, and 66.13% when few records on which to train are available. Proposed future research involves an exploration of the intellectual effort put into creating the DDC to further improve the algorithm performance as commonly applied in string matching, and to test the best approach on new digital collections that do not have DDC assigned.

  • 39.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Kirchkamp, Oliver
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Bubbles in hybrid markets: How expectations about algorithmic trading affect human trading2018In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 146, p. 248-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bubbles are omnipresent in lab experiments with asset markets. Most of these experiments are conducted in environments with only human traders. Since today's markets are substantially determined by algorithmic trading, we use a laboratory experiment to measure how human trading depends on the expected presence of algorithmic traders. We find that bubbles are clearly smaller when human traders expect algorithmic traders to be present.

  • 40.
    Nevalainen, Terttu
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Nevala, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Numi, Arja
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Changes in different stages: From nearing completion to completed2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 251-256Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Yantseva, Victoria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Cooperation and conflict in segregated populations2018In: Social science computer review, ISSN 0894-4393, E-ISSN 1552-8286, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans behavior often varies depending on the opponent’s group membership, with both positive consequences (e.g., cooperation or mutual help) and negative ones (e.g., stereotyping, oppression, or even genocide). An influential model developed by Hammond and Axelrod (HA) highlighted the emergence of macrolevel “ethnocentric cooperation” from the aggregation of microlevel interactions based on arbitrary tags signaling group membership. We extended this model to include a wider set of agents’ behaviors including the possibility of harming others. This allowed to check whether and under which conditions xenophobia can emerge beside or in alternative to ethnocentric cooperation. The model was compared to Swedish data documenting social unrest and proxies of cooperative behaviors at the municipal level. The validation results supported the model predictions on conflict but not the ones on cooperation, casting doubts on HA’s original argument.

  • 42.
    Farjam, Mike
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Dataset fo Investing into climate change mitigation initiatives despite the risk of failure: Version 2.02018Data set
  • 43.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Friedrich Schiller Univ, Germany.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Does risk communication really decrease cooperation in climate change mitigation?2018In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 147-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective communication of risks involved in the climate change discussion is crucial and despite ambitious protection policies, the possibility of irreversible consequences actually occurring can only be diminished but never ruled out completely. We present a laboratory experiment that studies how residual risk of failure of climate change policies affects willingness to contribute to such policies. Despite prevailing views on people's risk aversion, we found that contributions were higher at least in the final part of treatments including a residual risk. We interpret this as the product of a psychological process where residual risk puts participants into an "alarm mode," keeping their contributions high. We discuss the broad practical implications this might have on the real-world communication of climate change.

  • 44.
    Farjam, Mike
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    Nikolaychuk, Olexandr
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. DISA; CSS.
    does risk communication really decrease cooperation in climate change mitigation?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Kucher, Kostiantyn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Paradis, Carita
    Lund University.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    DoSVis: Document Stance Visualization2018In: Proceedings of the 13th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications (VISIGRAPP '18) / [ed] Alexandru C. Telea, Andreas Kerren, and José Braz, SciTePress, 2018, Vol. 3, p. 168-175Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Text visualization techniques often make use of automatic text classification methods. One of such methods is stance analysis, which is concerned with detecting various aspects of the writer’s attitude towards utterances expressed in the text. Existing text visualization approaches for stance classification results are usually adapted to textual data consisting of individual utterances or short messages, and they are often designed for social media or debate monitoring tasks. In this paper, we propose a visualization approach called DoSVis (Document Stance Visualization) that focuses instead on individual text documents of a larger length. DoSVis provides an overview of multiple stance categories detected by our classifier at the utterance level as well as a detailed text view annotated with classification results, thus supporting both distant and close reading tasks. We describe our approach by discussing several application scenarios involving business reports and works of literature. 

  • 46.
    Loxbo, Karl
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ethnic diversity, out-group contacts and social trust in a high-trust society2018In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 182-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although ethnic diversity is widely believed to undermine social trust, several scholars have argued that this outcome ultimately depends on the extent of high-quality contacts between diverse groups as well as the extent of equality in society. This article scrutinises these different hypotheses by exploring the association between ethnic diversity and social trust among Swedish schoolchildren. Building on data from Sweden, where legacies of equality would be expected to provide unique opportunities for building trust among diverse groups, the contribution of the article to the literature is twofold. First, it was found that contextual diversity is only weakly related to adolescents’ trust. Furthermore, while interactions revealed that a higher socio-economic level in a classroom reinforces, rather than cushions, the adverse effect, it is concluded that contextual measures obscure the micro-level dynamic underlying the association between diversity and trust in classrooms. Second, when accounting for compositional effects, and the distinction between in-group and out-group contact, the findings strongly supported the conflict hypothesis, while rejecting the contact hypothesis. The principal finding is that ethnic diversity in a classroom undermines social trust among native-born adolescents, whereas the effect is the exact opposite for minorities. In addition, social trust is only promoted if adolescents interact with members of their ethnic in-group. Because these disconcerting results were found in the high-trust context of Sweden, it is suggested that similar findings are likely in less favourable settings. The article concludes by arguing that the high levels of social trust in traditionally homogenous, but increasingly segregated, countries such as Sweden may conceal the fact that individuals primarily include others who are similar to themselves in their ‘imagined communities’.

  • 47.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy. Kalmar County Hospital ; Linköping University.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Factors influencing the quality of vital signs data in electronic health records: a qualitative study2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1276-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To investigate reasons for inadequate documentation of vital signs in an electronic health record.

    Background

    Monitoring vital signs is crucial to detecting and responding to patient deterioration. The ways in which vital signs are documented in electronic health records have received limited attention in the research literature. A previous study revealed that vital signs in an electronic health record were incomplete and inconsistent.

    Design

    Qualitative study.

    Methods

    Qualitative study. Data were collected by observing (68 hr) and interviewing nurses (n = 11) and doctors (n = 3), and analysed by thematic analysis to examine processes for measuring, documenting and retrieving vital signs in four clinical settings in a 353-bed hospital.

    Results

    We identified two central reasons for inadequate vital sign documentation. First, there was an absence of firm guidelines for observing patients’ vital signs, resulting in inconsistencies in the ways vital signs were recorded. Second, there was a lack of adequate facilities in the electronic health record for recording vital signs. This led to poor presentation of vital signs in the electronic health record and to staff creating paper “workarounds.”

    Conclusions

    This study demonstrated inadequate routines and poor facilities for vital sign documentation in an electronic health record, and makes an important contribution to knowledge by identifying problems and barriers that may occur. Further, it has demonstrated the need for improved facilities for electronic documentation of vital signs.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Patient safety may have been compromised because of poor presentation of vital signs. Thus, our results emphasised the need for standardised routines for monitoring patients. In addition, designers should consult the clinical end-users to optimise facilities for electronic documentation of vital signs. This could have a positive impact on clinical practice and thus improve patient safety.

  • 48.
    Palander-Collin, Minna
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Sairio, Anni
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Säily, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    From incipient to mid-range and beyond2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 246-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Säily, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Google Books: A shortcut to studying language variability?2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 225-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Farjam, Mike
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Moreno, Francisco Grimaldo
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Birukou, Aliaksandr
    Springer Nature, Germany.
    Squazzoni, Flaminio
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Hidden connections: Network effects on editorial decisions in four computer science journals2018In: Journal of Informetrics, ISSN 1751-1577, E-ISSN 1875-5879, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to examine the influence of authors’ reputation on editorial bias in scholarly journals. By looking at eight years of editorial decisions in four computer science journals, including 7179 observations on 2913 submissions, we reconstructed author/referee-submission networks. For each submission, we looked at reviewer scores and estimated the reputation of submission authors by means of their network degree. By training a Bayesian network, we estimated the potential effect of scientist reputation on editorial decisions. Results showed that more reputed authors were less likely to be rejected by editors when they submitted papers receiving negative reviews. Although these four journals were comparable for scope and areas, we found certain journal specificities in their editorial process. Our findings suggest ways to examine the editorial process in relatively similar journals without recurring to in-depth individual data, which are rarely available from scholarly journals.

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