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  • 1.
    Skeppstedt, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). The Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Ahltorp, Magnus
    The Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Rzepka, Rafal
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Araki, Kenji
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Application of a topic model visualisation tool to a second language2019In: Book of Abstracts of the CLARIN Annual Conference 2019, Leipzig, Germany, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored adaptions required for applying a topic modelling tool to a language that is very different from the one for which the tool was originally developed. The tool, which enables text analysis on the output of topic modelling, was developed for English, and we here applied it on Japanese texts. As white space is not used for indicating word boundaries in Japanese, the texts had to be pre-tokenised and white space inserted to indicate a token segmentation, before the texts could be imported into the tool. The tool was also extended by the addition of word translations and phonetic readings to support users who are second-language speakers of Japanese.

  • 2.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ardö, Anders
    Automatic classification Using DDC on the Swedish Union Catalogue2019In: European DDC Users Group, EDUG, Annual Meeting 9-10 May 2019: National Library of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Charting New Sources of elf Data: A Multi-Genre Corpus Approach2019In: From Data to Evidence in English Language Research / [ed] Carla Suhr, Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 326-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses research that charts new lingua franca English data and broadensthe scope of written elf corpora. We illustrate that, apart from the academic domain,there exist various written genres in non-native contexts in which English is used as asecond language resource alongside native languages. These uncharted data can provideus with new ways of approaching the ongoing globalization of English. The newapproach incorporates a broader perspective on elf than previously, seeing it as onestage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emergingin interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genrecorpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in linguafranca use. It is followed by three case studies investigating quantitative patterns ofongoing change in elf. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angleto lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to elf but also to ongoinggrammatical variability. It shows that the traditional and canonized way of seeing nonnativespeakers/writers is not sufficient, nor is the simplified view of norm dependency of non-native individuals.

  • 4.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Göransson, Elisabet
    Foka, Anna
    Huvila, Isto
    Digital humanities in Sweden and its infrastructure: Status quo and the sine qua non2019In: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, ISSN 2055-7671, E-ISSN 2055-768X, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article offers a state-of-the-art overview of a number of Digital Humanities (DH) initiatives that have emerged in Sweden over the past decade. We identify two major developments that seem to be taking place within DH, with a specific focus on the infrastructural aspects of the development: (1) a strive to open up and broaden the research output and (2) multi-disciplinary collaboration and its effects. The two major components accentuate the new infrastructural patterns that are developing and the challenges these infer on universities. While current research is at large multi-disciplinary, developing infrastructures also enable the move towards post-disciplinarity, bringing the universities closer to the surrounding society. At five universities in Sweden, individual-sited infrastructures supporting DH research have been built today. They are complemented by national and international infrastructures, thus supporting developments and tackling some of the major challenges. In the article, the relations between individual disciplines, the question of multi- and post-disciplinarity, and the field of Digital Humanities are discussed, while stressing the factors necessary—sine qua non—for a fruitful development of the scholarly infrastructures.

  • 5.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    DISA.
    Nordqvist, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics. DISA.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Towards a language independent Twitter bot detector2019In: Proceedings of 4th Conference of The Association Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries: Copenhagen, March 6-8 2019 / [ed] Navarretta Costanza et al., Copenhagen: Digital Humanities in the Nordic countries , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes our work in developing an application that recognizes automatically generated tweets. The objective of this machine learning application is to increase data accuracy in sociolinguistic studies that utilize Twitter by reducing skewed sampling and inaccuracies in linguistic data. Most previous machine learning attempts to exclude bot material have been language dependent since they make use of monolingual Twitter text in their training phase. In this paper, we present a language independent approach which classifies each single tweet to be either autogenerated (AGT) or human-generated (HGT). We define an AGT as a tweet where all or parts of the natural language content is generated automatically by a bot or other type of program. In other words, while AGT/HGT refer to an individual message, the term bot refers to non-personal and automated accounts that post content to online social networks. Our approach classifies a tweet using only metadata that comes with every tweet, and we utilize those metadata parameters that are both language and country independent. The empirical part shows good success rates. Using a bilingual training set of Finnish and Swedish tweets, we correctly classified about 98.2% of all tweets in a test set using a third language (English).

  • 6.
    Nevalainen, Terttu
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Nevala, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Numi, Arja
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Changes in different stages: From nearing completion to completed2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 251-256Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kucher, Kostiantyn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Paradis, Carita
    Lund University.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    DoSVis: Document Stance Visualization2018In: Proceedings of the 13th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications (VISIGRAPP '18) / [ed] Alexandru C. Telea, Andreas Kerren, and José Braz, SciTePress, 2018, Vol. 3, p. 168-175Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Text visualization techniques often make use of automatic text classification methods. One of such methods is stance analysis, which is concerned with detecting various aspects of the writer’s attitude towards utterances expressed in the text. Existing text visualization approaches for stance classification results are usually adapted to textual data consisting of individual utterances or short messages, and they are often designed for social media or debate monitoring tasks. In this paper, we propose a visualization approach called DoSVis (Document Stance Visualization) that focuses instead on individual text documents of a larger length. DoSVis provides an overview of multiple stance categories detected by our classifier at the utterance level as well as a detailed text view annotated with classification results, thus supporting both distant and close reading tasks. We describe our approach by discussing several application scenarios involving business reports and works of literature. 

  • 8.
    Palander-Collin, Minna
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Sairio, Anni
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Säily, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    From incipient to mid-range and beyond2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 246-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Säily, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Google Books: A shortcut to studying language variability?2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 225-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Indefinite pronouns with singular human reference: Recessive and ongoing2018In: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 137-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, MikkoLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Mobility, Variability and Changing Literacies in Modern Times2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. DISA.
    Mobility, variability and changing literacies in Modern times (Preface)2018In: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0028-3754, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 13-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, MikkoLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Mobility, Variability and Changing Literacies in Modern Times: Special issue of Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, Bulletin of the Modern Language Society, volume 1192018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Placing ELF among the varieties of English: Observations from typological profiling2018In: Modelling World Englishes in the 21st century: Assessing the interplay of emancipation and globalization of ESL varieties / [ed] Sandra C. Deshors, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 109-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how (dis)similar ELF is structurally from the core nativevarieties of English, indigenized L2 varieties, and learner English. ELF is understoodas second language use of English in settings where the interactants do notnecessarily share a first language. The empirical part makes use of the method oftypological profiling based on aggregate structural features. This method measuresthree indices (i.e. grammaticity, analyticity, and syntheticity), and it hasbeen used previously to analyze a range of variety types but has not been appliedto the assessment of ELF. The results provide quantitative evidence that placesELF on the map and shows that, on purely structural grounds, ELF is a distinctvariety type among English varieties. Moreover, the observations show that ELFis structurally different from second language acquisition, and there is a quantitativebasis for drawing a distinction between ELF and traditional learner data.

  • 15. Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    The Nordic Tweet Stream: A Dynamic Real-Time Monitor Corpus of Big and Rich Language Data2018In: DHN 2018 Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 3rd Conference: Proceedings of the Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 3rd Conference Helsinki, Finland, March 7-9, 2018 / [ed] Eetu Mäkelä, Mikko Tolonen, Jouni Tuominen, CEUR-WS.org , 2018, p. 349-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the Nordic Tweet Stream (NTS), a cross-disciplinarycorpus project of computer scientists and a group of sociolinguists interestedin language variability and in the global spread of English. Our research integratestwo types of empirical data: We not only rely on traditional structured corpusdata but also use unstructured data sources that are often big and rich inmetadata, such as Twitter streams. The NTS downloads tweets and associatedmetadata from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. We first introducesome technical aspects in creating a dynamic real-time monitor corpus, andthe following case study illustrates how the corpus could be used as empiricalevidence in sociolinguistic studies focusing on the global spread of English tomultilingual settings. The results show that English is the most frequently usedlanguage, accounting for almost a third. These results can be used to assess howwidespread English use is in the Nordic region and offer a big data perspectivethat complement previous small-scale studies. The future objectives include annotatingthe material, making it available for the scholarly community, and expandingthe geographic scope of the data stream outside Nordic region.

  • 16.
    Alasuutari, Pertti
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Rautalin, Marjaana
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Tyrkkö, Jukka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Rise of the Idea of Model in Policymaking: The case of the British parliament, 1803-20052018In: European Journal of Sociology / Archives Européennes de Sociologie, ISSN 0003-9756, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 341-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses the question whether national decision-making has become increasingly interdependent in recent decades, and what role “world models” play in any such trend. These questions are scrutinised by utilising the “Historic Hansard” corpus, which contains all records of the UK Parliament from 1803 to 2005, complemented by other corpora. The results show that references to other countries were most frequent in parliamentary debates very early in the 19th century. However, allusions to other countries have evolved from referencing case examples to referencing policies that are constructed and branded as models. The idea of transferable models caught on particularly strongly from the 1950s onward. The other corpora used for the study confirmed that these changes reflect a global trend. Hence, the post-war era has witnessed a worldwide spread of the idea of model as a precondition for a global proliferation of named models.

  • 17.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Lakaw, Alexander
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Revisiting weak ties: Using present-day social media data in variationist studies2017In: Exploring Future Paths for Historical Sociolinguistics / [ed] Tanja Säily, Minna Palander-Collin, Arja Nurmi, Anita Auer, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 303-325Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article makes use of big and rich present-day data to revisit the social network model in sociolinguistics. This model predicts that mobile individuals with ties outside a home community and subsequent loose-knit networks tend to promote the diffusion of linguistic innovations. The model has been applied to a range of small ethnographic networks. We use a database of nearly 200,000 informants who send micro-blog messages in Twitter. We operationalize networks using two ratio variables; one of them is a truly weak tie and the other one a slightly stronger one. The results show that there is a straightforward increase of innovative behavior in the truly weak tie network, but the data indicate that innovations also spread under conditions of stronger networks, given that the network size is large enough. On the methodological level, our approach opens up new horizons in using big and often freely available data in sociolinguistics, both past and present.

  • 18.
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Simaki, Vasiliki
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science. Lund University.
    Kucher, Kostiantyn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Paradis, Carita
    Lund University.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    StanceXplore: Visualization for the Interactive Exploration of Stance in Social Media2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of interactive visualization techniques in Digital Humanities research can be a useful addition when traditional automated machine learning techniques face difficulties, as is often the case with the exploration of large volumes of dynamic—and in many cases, noisy and conflicting—textual data from social media. Recently, the field of stance analysis has been moving from a predominantly binary approach—either pro or con—to a multifaceted one, where each unit of text may be classified as one (or more) of multiple possible stance categories. This change adds more layers of complexity to an already hard problem, but also opens up new opportunities for obtaining richer and more relevant results from the analysis of stancetaking in social media. In this paper we propose StanceXplore, a new visualization for the interactive exploration of stance in social media. Our goal is to offer DH researchers the chance to explore stance-classified text corpora from different perspectives at the same time, using coordinated multiple views including user-defined topics, content similarity and dissimilarity, and geographical and temporal distribution. As a case study, we explore the activity of Twitter users in Sweden, analyzing their behavior in terms of topics discussed and the stances taken. Each textual unit (tweet) is labeled with one of eleven stance categories from a cognitive-functional stance framework based on recent work. We illustrate how StanceXplore can be used effectively to investigate multidimensional patterns and trends in stance-taking related to cultural events, their geographical distribution, and the confidence of the stance classifier. 

  • 19.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    What happens to ongoing change in multilingual settings?: A corpus compiler’s perspective on new data and new research prospects2017In: Challenging the Myth of Monolingual Corpora / [ed] Arja Nurmi, Päivi Pahta, Tanja Rütten, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, p. 58-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Ongoing changes and advanced L2 use of English: Evidence from new corpus resources2016In: Corpus Linguistics on the Move: Exploring and Understanding English through Corpora / [ed] María José López-Couso, Belén Méndez-Naya, Paloma Núñez-Pertejo, Ignacio M. Palacios-Martínez, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 59-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the global spread of English by charting new ways of studying the expansion and diversification of English to non-native contexts. The research builds on the idea that the ongoing globalization of English calls for new empirical approaches to contact, variability, and the interplay of the established varieties andnew forms of English. It tests the methods of recent and ongoing grammatical change in investigating advanced non-native use. This methodology, combining historical linguistics and variationist sociolinguistics in a statistically sensitive corpus-based framework, has previously been used in the study of native varieties, but not in non-nativecontexts. The chapter first presents the compilation of a new multi-genre corpus ofadvanced English texts in non-instructional settings in Sweden and Finland, and then provides three case studies which examine how various lexico-grammatical variablescurrently undergoing change are adopted in non-native contexts. The results show substantial differences between traditional learner evidence and advanced non-native English in use, and indicate that the non-native evidence lands somewhere in betweenthe most advanced variety, standard American English, but ahead of other native and non-native inner and outer circle varieties. The findings therefore suggest that the processes and mechanisms of variability emerging in the globalization of English are more complex than previously thought.

  • 21.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Ongoing changes in English modals: On the developments in ELF2016In: New Approaches in English Linguistics: Building Bridges / [ed] Olga Timofeeva, Sarah Chevalier, Anne-Christine Gardner, Alpo Honkapohja, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 175-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates how ongoing grammatical change, widely documented in various native varieties, is adopted in advanced lingua franca use of English (ELF). It incorporates a broader perspective on ELF than previously, seeing it as one stage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emerging in spoken interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genre corpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in lingua franca use. It is followed with a case study investigating quantitative patterns in a set of core and emergent modal auxiliaries. The results suggest that in cases of substantial recent changes in the core varieties of English, lingua franca uses polarize the diffusion of change. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angle to lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to ELF but also to ongoing grammatical variability.

1 - 21 of 21
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