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  • 1.
    Herault, Romain Christian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Lundman, Madeleine
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Developing Attractive Information Landscapes for the Mapping of Cultural Events Using Web and Mobile Technologies: Uppföljningsseminarium av fakultetsöverskridande project, 22 mars 20182018Other (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [ Review of ] Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić : Digital Libraries for Cultural Heritage : Development, Outcomes, and Challenges from European Perspectives2018In: Vjesnik Bibliotekara Hrvatske, ISSN 0507-1925, E-ISSN 1334-6938Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Making of an iSchool2018In: Information today, ISSN 8755-6286, E-ISSN 2169-0340, Vol. 35, no 4Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    A framework for evaluating automatic indexing or classification in the context of retrieval: invited talk2017In: A Calculus of Culture : Circumventing the Black Box of Culture Analytics, Guangxi University, China, March 21-23, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Tyrkkö, Jukka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Jusufi, Ilir
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ardö, Anders
    Lund University.
    Automatic subject classification for improving retrieval in a Swedish repository2017In: ISKO UK Conference 2017: Knowledge Organization: what's the story?, 11 – 12 September 2017, London, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent adoption of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) in Sweden has ignited discussions about automated subject classification especially for digital collections, which generally seem to lack subject indexing from controlled vocabularies. This is particularly problematic in the context of academic resource retrieval tasks, which require an understanding of discipline-specific terminologies and the narratives behind their internal ontologies. The currently available experimental classification software have not been adequately tested and their usefulness is unproven especially for Swedish language resources. We address these issues by investigating a unifying framework of automatic subject indexing for the DDC, including an analysis of suitable interactive visualisation features for supporting these aims. We will address the disciplinary narratives behind the DDC in selected subject areas and the preliminary results will include an analysis of the data collection and a breakdown of the methodology. Major visualisation possibilities in support of the classification process are also outlined. The project will contribute significantly to Swedish information infrastructure by improving the findability of Swedish research resources by subject searching, one of the most common yet the most challenging types of searching.

  • 6.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Automatic subject indexing of text2017In: ISKO: Encyclopedia of Knowledge Organization / [ed] Birger Hjørland, Claudio Gnoli, International Society for Knowledge Organization , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automatic subject indexing addresses problems of scale and sustainability and can be at the same time used to enrich existing metadata records, establish more connections across and between resources from various metadata and resource collections, and enhance consistency of the metadata. In this entry automatic subject indexing focuses on assigning index terms or classes from established knowledge organization systems (KOS) for subject indexing like thesauri, subject headings systems and classification systems. The following major approaches are discussed, in terms of their similarities and differences, advantages and disadvantages for automatic assigned indexing from KOSs: “text categorization”, “document clustering”, and “document classification”. Text categorization is perhaps the most widespread, machine-learning approach with what seems generally good reported performance. This, however, is dependent on availability of training corpora with documents already categorized which are in many cases not there. Document clustering automatically both creates groups of related documents and extracts names of subjects depicting the group at hand. It does not require training documents, but the reported automatically extracted terms and structures are not always of good quality, reflecting the underlying problems of the natural language; also, they both change when new documents are added to the collection and this mutability may not be user-friendly. Document classification re-uses the intellectual effort invested into creating KOSs for subject indexing and even simple string-matching algorithms have been reported to achieve good results because one concept can be described using a number of different terms, including equivalent, related, narrower and broader terms. Finally, applicability of automatic subject indexing to operative information systems and challenges of evaluation are outlined, suggesting the need for more research.

  • 7.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    (Big) Data in Library and Information Science: A Brief Overview of Some Important Problem Areas2017In: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 1098-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Libraries hold a long history of a multidimensional focus on collecting, storing, organizing, preserving and providing access to information resources for various types of users. Data is nothing new to Library and Information Science (LIS) and Big Data presents a quantitative expansion of an already well-known object of study. Scholarly communication, data sharing and data curation are three areas related to data in LIS and are discussed in this paper in the light of current developments as well as from the perspective of attaining the research area relevance in the discipline over time. Big Data, new technologies and networked research environments will continue to increase both in numbers and size. LIS is rapidly developing tools to meet the opportunities arising - through educational initiatives and the development of new research areas such as data curation and altmetrics. Since social and political demands for open data grow, these issues are pressing.

  • 8.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Seldén, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Cult of the "I": Organizational symbolism and curricula in three Scandinavian iSchools with comparisons to three American2017In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 48-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum content in relation to these intentions. By doing so, a picture will be given of the international expansion of the iSchool concept in terms of organisational symbolism and practical educational content. In order to underline the approaches of the Scandinavian schools, comparisons are made to three American iSchools.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study is framed through theory on organisational symbolism and the intentions of the iSchool movement as formulated in its vision statements. Empirically, the study consists of two parts: close readings of three documents outlining the considerations of three Scandinavian LIS schools before applying for the iSchool status, and statistical analysis of 427 syllabi from master level courses at three Scandinavian and three American iSchools.

    Findings

    All three Scandinavian schools, analysed, have recently become iSchools, and though some differences are visible, it is hard to distinguish anything in their syllabi as carriers of what can be described as an iSchool identity. In considering iSchool identity, it instead benefits on a symbolic level that are most prominent, such as branding, social visibility and the possible attraction of new student groups. The traditionally strong relation to national library sectors are emphasised as important to maintain, specifically in Norway and Sweden.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study is done on iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with empirical comparison to three American schools. These comparisons face the challenge of meeting the educational system and programme structure of each individual country. Despite this, findings prove possible to use as ground for conclusions, although empirical generalisations concerning, for instance, other countries must be made with caution.

    Practical implications

    This study highlights the practical challenges met in international expansion of the iSchool movement, both on a practical and symbolic level. Both the iSchool Caucus and individual schools considering becoming iSchools may use these findings as a point of reference in development and decision making.

    Originality/value

    This is an original piece of research from which the results may contribute to the international development of the iSchool movement, and extend the theoretical understanding of the iSchool movement as an educational and organisational construct.

  • 9.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ping Huang, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Mikko, Tolonen
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Matres, Inés
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergsland, Andreas
    Norwegian University for Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Current efforts, perspectives and challenges related to Digital Humanities in Nordic countries2017In: DH 2016. Digital Humanities 2016: Extended Papers of the International Symposium on Digital Humanities (DH 2016). Växjö, Sweden, November, 7-8, 2016 / [ed] Koraljka Golub, Marcelo Milrad, CEUR-WS.org , 2017, p. 119-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a panel discussion at the International Digital Humanities (DH) Symposium, held in Växjö, 7-8 November 2016. The panel was organized to carry out a review of different DH initiatives related to current projects, educational initiatives and research and development activities, principally from the following universities: Linnaeus University, Sweden; Aarhus University, Denmark; University of Helsinki, Finland; and the Norwegian University for Science and Technology, Norway. Furthermore, the report proposes the formation of a Nordic hub of DARIAH-EU (Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities) and the challenges and opportunities arising from it. Opportunities include, for example: joint research and innovation efforts, education, expertise and experience exchange, and bringing in international perspectives to address transnational and regional challenges. The following challenges have been identified, namely: student recruitment, job opportunities in an emerging new market for graduates, and funding schemes.

  • 10.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, MarceloLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    DH 2016. Digital Humanities 2016: Extended Papers of the International Symposium on Digital Humanities (DH 2016). Växjö, Sweden, November, 7-8, 20162017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Billore, Soniya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Digital humanities: an exploration of a new programs in higher education and its meaning making by community partners2017In: Extended Papers of the International Symposium on Digital Humanities (DH 2016): Växjö, Sweden, November, 7-8, 2016 / [ed] Koraljka Golub & Marcelo Milrad, CEUR-WS.org , 2017, Vol. 2021, p. 119-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the Digital Humanities initiative at Linnaeus University, this exploratory study is aimed at gathering views and opinions from relevant stakeholders in the regional community in order to understand their perspective on Digital Humanities as a subject of study and the potential application of Digital Humanities to address local requirements. The ultimate purpose of the study was to inform the development of Digital Humanities at Linnaeus University in a way that would address genuine needs within society. The principal research question of the study was: "What views and opinions are there about Digital Humanities and how can they be exploited for the optimal benefit of the education and industry sectors of the local region of Småland?" A focus group interview of four stakeholders was conducted, each representing a different cultural institution in the region. The participants largely agreed that Digital Humanities could be used in optimal ways to engage people and end users in their work and social engagement. The Digital Humanities project could contribute and engage with wider society through schools, museums and other public platforms. However, the sustainability of the Digital Humanities project requires further study. Also, as a provider of higher education in Sweden, it was important to bear in mind that the proposed educational programme in the Digital Humanities needs to keep to the three pillars of Education, Research, and Engagement with Society as the primary components of their course development. 

  • 12.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Digital Humanities and iField: Challenges and Opportunites on a Case of a Swedish University2017Other (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Digital Humanities education at Linnaeus University2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Digital Humanities Master at Linnaeus University2017In: 2nd International Symposium Digital Humanities: Empowering Visibility of Croatian Cultural Heritage: November 6 – 8, 2017, University of Zadar, Croatia, 2017, p. 21-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linnaeus University has been leading several big initiatives at cross-sectora and cross- disciplinary axes over the past years, with the purpose of addressing future societal challenges. Digital Humanities is one of them; it has been receiving funds since 2016. Current big focus is placed on developing a Master program in Digital Humanities. The program is considered unique in that it defines a small core of obligatory courses and a big selection of elective from any relevant discipline at the university, grouped around three major suites: humanities, technology, business and economics. Further, major feature of the program is involving external sectors to the largest degree possible. The program will be given in the international online mode, free of charge to citizens of the European Union with a completed Bachelor degree. In order to test challenges and opportunities on this new interdisciplinary program, several courses were planned to be given in 2017 and 2018. The first course titled Programming for Digital Humanities is underway. The presentation will include these topics as well as discuss issues around bringing together different disciplines, students from different backgrounds, and teachers from different disciplines as well as from different sectors. 

  • 15.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Overview of Centre for Data Intensive Sciences in Applications at Linnaeus University: invited talk2017In: A Calculus of Culture : Circumventing the Black Box of Culture Analytics, Guangxi University, China, March 21-23, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Berketa, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Zadar, Croatia.
    Lundman, Madeleine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Dragija Ivanovic, Martina
    University of Zadar, Croatia.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The importance of quality classification and subject indexing of health information in public libraries: A comparative analysis2017In: Improving Quality of Life Through Information: Proceedings of the XXV Bobcatsss Symposium, Tampere, Finland, January 2017 / [ed] Paavo Arvola, Tanja Hintsanen, Serafia Kari, Soile Kolehma, Shan Luolin, Jasmiina Sillanpää, 2017, p. 131-136Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this paper is to explore the practice of subject indexing and classification of health information in public libraries. The pilot study encompasses two public libraries, each from a different European country, Croatia and Sweden: Zadar Public Library, and Växjö Public Library. The research questions are: 1) how important is the terminology for subject headings; and, 2) how many subject terms are enough to describe an information resource in a catalog record? The research was done in two phases. First, an exploratory evaluation of subject searching in the catalogs was conducted. Second, after the analysis of the catalogs, questions for interviews were formed. Four semi-structured interviews were conducted, two per library, of which one interview with a subject librarian and one with a reference librarian. Finally, a comparative analysis between the two libraries from the two countries was con- ducted. Results imply that the subject headings and classification used were very generic and did not cater for specific, topically narrower queries. Also, subject indexing was considered important, especially to the librarians for searching purposes through ensuring consistency in the catalog, thereby making it easier to find resources on the same topics.

  • 17.
    Faletar Tanackovic, Sanjica
    et al.
    University of Osijek, Croatia.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University.
    The meaning of interoperability and its implications for archival institutions: Challenges and opportunities in Croatia, Finland and Sweden2017In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This exploratory study aims to map the premises of developing interoperability of archival holdings and the understanding of how “interoperability” is understood from an operational perspective at archival institutions. The study is based on a comparative survey of the views of archivists from Croatian, Finnish and Swedish archives on the perceived needs, barriers and preferences regarding online access and interoperability of a their metadata and holdings.

    Method. A web survey comprising 35 multiple-choice and open-ended questions focusing on current state and plans regarding online access and interoperability of the holdings and metadata of the institutions was sent out to archives in Croatia, Finland and Sweden in autumn 2015.

    Analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses were carried out on the data, which related to 45 individual archives. Quantitative analysis employed the statistical package SPSS, while the qualitative analysis referred to content analysis of open questions by one of the researchers.

    Results. While the respondents are unanimous in their opinion that interoperability is important for their institutions and useful for their users, the current level of interoperability and the online access to holdings provided by the responding institutions in discrepancy with this opinion. The lack of resources and expertise could be traced back to the shortage of interest at strategic and managerial level.

    Conclusion. The findings suggest that there are several obstacles in the way to providing improved interoperability and online access to archival holdings and metadata. At the same time, there is a lack of conceptual agency that would try to redefine the problem and try to choose appropriate methods, develop meanings and relations between the concept of interoperability and the principles of archival work.

  • 18.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ping Huang, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Tolonen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergsland, Andreas
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Mats, Malm
    University of Gothenburg.
    The Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU: A DH Ecosystem of Cross-Disciplinary Approaches2017In: Presented at Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 2nd Conference, Gothenburg, 14–16 March 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION

    The particular exploration of new ways of interactions between society and Information Communication Technologies (ICT) with a focus on the Humanities has the potential to become a key success factor for the values and competitiveness of the Nordic region, having in mind recent EU and regional political discussions in the field of Digital Humanities (European Commission, 2016; Vetenskapsrådet’s Rådet för forskningens infrastrukturer, 2014). Digital Humanities (DH) is a diverse and still emerging field that lies at the intersection of ICT and Humanities, which is being continually formulated by scholars and practitioners in a range of disciplines (see, for example, Svensson & Goldberg, 2015; Gardiner & Musto, 2015; Schreibman, Siemens, & Unsworth, 2016). The following are examples of current areas of fields and topics: text-analytic techniques, categorization, data mining; Social Network Analysis (SNA) and bibliometrics; metadata and tagging; Geographic Information Systems (GIS); multimedia and interactive games; Music Information Retrieval (MIR); interactive visualization and media.

    DARIAH-EU (http://dariah.eu), is Europe’s largest initiative on DH, comprising over 300 researchers in 18 countries, thereby opening up opportunities for international collaboration and projects. Among the Nordic countries, Denmark is the full partner with four universities, Copenhagen, Aarhus, Aalborg and University of Southern Denmark (DARIAH-DK). Danish DARIAH-EU activities are facilitated by the national DH Infrastructure DIGHUMLAB, hosted at the DARIAH-DK coordinating institution, Aarhus University. Sweden’s first academic institution, Linnaeus University, joined in May 2016 as a collaborative partner. Finland (University of Helsinki) and Norway (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) also became collaborative partners, in November 2016. The Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU (DARIAH-Nordic) held its first meeting on 8 November in Växjö, Sweden, in connection with the International Symposium on Digital Humanities (Växjö, 7-8 November, https://lnu.se/en/research/conferences/international-digital-humanities-symposium/).

    The Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries (DHN) organisation was established in 2015 in order to create a venue for interaction and collaboration between the Nordic countries, including the Baltic countries. The ambitions behind the DHN initiative thus largely overlap with the recently formed Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU. The panel would like to present different perspectives on Nordic contributions to DH as well as the aims of the DARIAH-Nordic and discuss possible joint opportunities and challenges in Nordic DH. With its tradition in supporting the Humanities research and development, Nordic countries may serve as a bastion for (Digital) Humanities. The Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU and DHN may pave the way forward towards reaching that aim.

    A DH ECOSYSTEM OF CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPROACHES

    Mats Malm (previous chair of DHN) will present the visions and ambitions behind DHN and the recently established Centre for Digital Humanities at the University of Gothenburg, which will start a Master programme in Digital Humanities in the autumn of 2017. While both the Centre for Digital Humanities and DHN aim at broad inclusiveness, he will here focus on the use of textual databases for re-examining the history and cultural heritage of the Nordic countries. This implies collaboration on common textual resources and technologies for mining, at the same time as it raises a number of questions concerning cross-disciplinarity and exchange of perspectives and methods.

    Mikko Tolonen will present the ongoing developments at the University of Helsinki (and in Finland) regarding Digital Humanities. This includes the recently launched Heldig (Digital Humanities Centre, https://www.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/helsinki-digital-humanities) and how it can relate to collaboration in DARIAH-EU. Tolonen will particularly discuss the relationship between the Digital Humanities infrastructure designed to be implemented at the University of Helsinki and how it relates to ongoing grassroot research projects.

    Andreas Bergsland will discuss the role that the arts might play within Digital Humanities. As a starting point, he will take the work that has been done at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU): establishing ARTEC, an interdisciplinary task force at the intersection of art and technology. He will argue how some of ARTEC’s initiatives might have both opportunities and challenges partly converging with those of the DH field, but might also expand and enrich current practices. One such initiative, Adressaparken, is a commons area in Trondheim for exploration of sensor-based digital storytelling and an open arena for test and experimentation of new experiences and new digital media. While most DH initiatives in Europe seem to focus on computational humanities projects, Bergsland will explore the unique potential of integrating artistic and creative practices into DH/ARTEC initiatives at NTNU.

    Koraljka Golub and Marcelo Milrad will present and analyse the cross-sector and cross-disciplinary Digital Humanities Initiative at Linnaeus University (LNU) along the axes of its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Their long-term vision is to: 1) create a leading and innovative educational programme in this field; and, 2) to establish a prominent research regional centre that combines in novel ways already existing expertise from different departments and faculties working in close collaboration and co-creation with people and different organizations (both public and private sector) from the surrounding society. The main goals of this new initiative (launched in February 2016) at the first phase (12-15 months) are twofold; first, to establish the foundations for the creation of a DH educational programme and second, to carry out research and create an innovation centre at the wider region surrounding LNU, encompassing east southern Sweden. A combination of cross-disciplinary, cross-sector and international aspects would provide a solid ground to build a more or less unique international distance Master-level programme. Addressing future societal challenges would be eventually possible, 1) by highly skilled professionals whose education has been markedly enhanced by practice-informed education, and, 2) through joint, cross-sector innovation.

    Marianne Ping Huang will present DARIAH-EU related activities in a Danish and European context, focusing on initiatives for cultural creative participation, including born digital cultural data and a presentation of open cross-sectoral innovation with DARIAH-EU Humanities at Scale (2015-2017). DARIAH-EU will set up its new Innovation Board in 2017 and host the first DARIAH-EU Innovation Forum with the Creativity World Forum in Aarhus, November 2017, intersecting with Aarhus European Capital of Culture 2017. DARIAH-EU’s move towards digitally enhanced public humanities, closer collaboration with GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums) institutions, and public-private innovation will be discussed in light of the scope of DH and the Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU.

    DISCUSSION POINTS: PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES

    The great breadth of cross-disciplinary and organizational initiatives presented above presents significant potential for DH in Nordic countries. Major opportunities lie in the collaborative democratic tradition that supports re-combining already existing expertise and resources encompassing 1) different universities, 2) various disciplines, and 3) the wider community through input from related public and private sectors. These points serve to unite and consolidate already existing expertise in order to create new constellations for collaboration leading to new knowledge and products (expertise, education, research, public and relevant commercial services). Possibilities to collaborate across Nordic countries can take place at a number of levels, including joint research and innovation, education efforts, expertise and experience exchange, bringing in international views to address more regional challenges. Ensuing important value for the general public could be a (re)-affirmation of the value of humanities in particular, and academic practices in general.

    Challenges would be discussed in terms of the emerging job market, the low number of students pursuing carriers in humanities at the Master level (e.g., in Sweden), and the fact that DH as a field is still in its infancy, leading to it being quite difficult to get funding and grants to carry out long-term research that sustain our efforts over time. Related to sustainability is the question on how to promote a dialogue and collaboration with potential industrial partners in order to run collaborative projects that go beyond just research. Not the least, epistemological, conceptual and terminological differences in approaches by the different disciplines and sectors may present further challenges and therefore may require additional resources to reach an understanding. Further, while there is a strong collaborative spirit across Nordic countries, there will certainly be administrative issues with cross-university collaboration as the current working structures are based on individual units.

  • 19.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Dagobert, Soergel
    University of Buffalo, USA.
    Buchanan, George
    City University, UK.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wales, UK.
    Lykke, Marianne
    University of Aalborg, Denmark.
    Hiom, Debra
    University of Bristol, UK.
    A framework for evaluating automatic indexing or classification in the context of retrieval2016In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 2330-1635, E-ISSN 2330-1643, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tools for automatic subject assignment help deal with scale and sustainability in creating and enriching metadata, establishing more connections across and between resources and enhancing consistency. While some software vendors and experimental researchers claim the tools can replace manual subject indexing, hard scientific evidence of their performance in operating information environments is scarce. A major reason for this is that research is usually conducted in laboratory conditions, excluding the complexities of real-life systems and situations. The paper reviews and discusses issues with existing evaluation approaches such as problems of aboutness and relevance assessments, implying the need to use more than a single “gold standard” method when evaluating indexing and retrieval and proposes a comprehensive evaluation framework. The framework is informed by a systematic review of the literature on indexing, classification and approaches: evaluating indexing quality directly through assessment by an evaluator or through comparison with a gold standard; evaluating the quality of computer-assisted indexing directly in the context of an indexing workflow, and evaluating indexing quality indirectly through analyzing retrieval performance.

  • 20.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, JoacimLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.Seldén, LarsLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology: Special Issue : iSchools Around the World2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Digital Humanities as a Cross-Sector and Cross-Discipline Initiative: Prospects in the Linnaeus University Region2016In: The 3rd International Conference on Behavioral, Economic, and Socio-Cultural Computing Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 11-13 November, 2016 (BESC 2016), IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper presents and analyses thecross-sector and cross-disciplinary Digital Humanities Initiativeat Linnaeus University along the axes of its strengths,weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Our long-term vision is tocreate a leading education in this field and to establish a leadingresearch regional centre that combines in novel ways alreadyexisting expertise from different departments and facultiesworking in close collaboration and co-creation with people anddifferent organizations (both public and private sector) from thesurrounding society.

  • 22.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Digital Humanities at the Linnaeus Region: Challenges and Opportunities: An invited talk for Linnaeus University at Göteborg Bokmässan, 23 September 20162016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ping Huang, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Tolonen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Matres, Inés
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergsland, Andreas
    Norwegian University for Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries: Current efforts, perspectives and challenges2016In: International Symposium on Digital Humanities, Växjö, 7-8 November 2016: Book of Abstracts, Linnaeus University , 2016, p. 9-11Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Digital Humanities Initiative at Linnaeus University2016Other (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, MarceloLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    International Symposium on Digital Humanities, Växjö 7-8 November 2016: Book of Abstracts2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    LNU as a Unique iSchool2016Other (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Potential and Challenges of Subject Access in Libraries Today on the Example of Swedish Libraries2016In: The international information & library review, ISSN 1057-2317, E-ISSN 1095-9297, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 204-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The “Advances in Library Data and Access” column examines technological advances internal and external to libraries. The focus is on how library data is created and used. The strength of the column is its broad, international focus, and contributors are encouraged to explore issues and recent advances in information technology relevant to their geographical region, as well as the larger, global audience. Interested authors are invited to submit proposals and articles to the column editor at moulaisonhe@missouri.edu. Please include “IILR Submission” in the subject line of the e-mail.

    Ensuring quality subject access in information services is one of the major tasks in libraries and related information institutions. An exploratory study of Swedish library catalogs indicates that subject access is not addressed systematically, that in new digital collections knowledge organization systems are applied to a limited degree, and in integrated library and commercial databases the mappings between the different knowledge organization systems do not exist. Possibilities are suggested to help alleviate these issues, such as social tagging and automated subject indexing; how to best implement them calls for further research.

  • 28.
    Mayr, Philipp
    et al.
    GESIS - Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany.
    Tudhope, DouglasUniversity of South Wales, UK.Golub, KoraljkaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.Wartena, ChristianHochschule Hannover, Germany.De Luca, Ernesto WilliamGeorg Eckert Institute, Germany.
    Proceedings of the 15th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems Workshop (NKOS 2016): co-located with the 20th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries 2016 (TPDL 2016) : Hannover, Germany, September 9, 20162016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lassi, Monica
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Johnsson, Maria
    Lund University.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Research data services: An exploration of requirements at two Swedish universities2016In: IFLA Journal, ISSN 0340-0352, E-ISSN 1745-2651, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 266-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reports on an exploratory study of researchers’ needs for effective research data management at two Swedish universities, conducted in order to inform the ongoing development of research data services. Twelve researchers from diverse fields have been interviewed, including biology, cultural studies, economics, environmental studies, geography, history, linguistics, media and psychology. The interviews were structured, guided by the Data Curation Profiles Toolkit developed at Purdue University, with added questions regarding subject metadata. The preliminary analysis indicates that the research data management practices vary greatly among the respondents, and therefore so do the implications for research data services. The added questions on subject metadata indicate needs of services guiding researchers in describing their datasets with adequate metadata.

  • 30.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    (Semi)-automated subject indexing of Swedish resources: Evaluating (a combination of) cataloguers', end users' and automated index terms in retrieval2016In: International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2016 (DC-2016): Special session : University Metadata and Retrieval : The Death of the Library Catalog?, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Some Thoughts on Preserving Functions of Library Catalogs in Networked Environments2016In: Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 1931-6550, E-ISSN 1550-8366, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 23-25Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Classification and subject indexing systems have long been the mainstay of established information providers to deliver content precisely on topic. Logical semantic hierarchies and rich interconnections of related terms and synonyms enable accurate retrieval and browsing of similar resources and ideally should be available in online environments. But the cost of features may not be sustainable with massively growing resources. Efforts to merge databases and map disparate subject terminology require considerable human intervention. A possible solution combines controlled and uncontrolled terms from three sources: authoritative professional indexing, automated term suggestion and uncontrolled keywords proposed by authors or end users’ social tags. Research is required to investigate the effectiveness, cost and applicability of combining controlled and uncontrolled terms for information retrieval.

  • 32.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Tehnološki standardi u sustavima za organizaciju znanja: [ Technological standards in knowledge organization systems ]2016In: Predmetna obrada : pogled unaprijed, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Welcome and introduction: To workshop and participants2016In: 16th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop at the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2016 (DC-2016), 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34. Cupar, Drahomira
    et al.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Zastupljenost tema iz područja organizacijeinformacija u studijskim programima u polju informacijskih znanosti - knjižničarstva u Hrvatskoj: stanje i perspektiva2016In: Ogledi o informacijskim znanostima / [ed] Sanjica Faletar Tanacković, Martina Dragija Ivanović, University of Zadar , 2016, p. 155-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Big data in Library and Information Science: from scientific communication and metadata to cultural sciences2015In: Big data: från hype till handling, Linnaeus University, 4 December 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Developments at LNU: Big Data / Digital Humanities / …2015In: Digital Humanities: Opportunities and Challenges, Lund University, 23 November 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Tågerud, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    En bibliometrisk undersökning av bibliometrins utveckling: Undersökning av hur publikationen av bibliometriska, informetriska, scientometriska och webometriska artiklar har utvecklats sedan 1960- talet2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this bachelor thesis is to analyse the publication- and citation patterns of the articles concerning bibliometrics, informetrics, scientometrics, and webometrics which can be found on Web of Science, and give a brief description of how the definition of the four terms has developed. I have looked at how the number of published papers have developed over the years and to what extent they have been quoted by other researchers. I have also briefly adressed what other research fields are referring to articles published in the four areas. The material I looked at includes articles that can be found on Web of Science with one (or more) of the four terms as topic and are categorised under library- and information science starting with the first bibliometrics article which was published in 1969, and ending in 2013. The results show that the publications in all four fields are continuously increasing. For bibliometrics and scientometrics it shows a slow increase up until 2005, then increasing exponentially. Informetric seems to be a comparatively small topic and webometrics is increasing, but is still a relatively young topic which makes it hard to make any concrete conclusions Regarding the citations, it shows that citations for the bibliometrical articles have had a steady curve increasing up until 2005, and then decreasing, the informetric- and scientometrical articles have rather scattered results and the webometrics have decreasing results, which I deduce is based on the fact that it is a new field and citations do not appear until after a few years. Finally I recommend future research, based on the related research I have found. 

  • 38.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Evaluating automatic subject indexing: a framework2015In: 7th ISKO Italy Meeting, Bologna, 20 April, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve search for information by people, it is important to have a good idea to what degree is it possible to apply automated subject indexing or classification, based either on controlled indexing languages or on derived indexing of keywords from the resource at hand itself.

    Automated subject assignment has the potential to help deal with scale and sustainability in creating and enriching metadata, establishing more connections across and between resources and enhancing consistency. While some software vendors and experimental researchers claim automated tools can replace manual subject indexing, hard scientific evidence of their performance in operating information environments is scarce. A major reason for this is that research is usually conducted in laboratory conditions, excluding the complexities of real-life systems and situations.

    The talk reviews issues with existing evaluation approaches such as problems of aboutness and relevance assessments, implying the need to use more than a single "gold standard" method when evaluating indexing and retrieval. A comprehensive evaluation framework is proposed, informed by a review of the literature on manual and automated indexing.

    Three major steps are predicted.

    1. Automatically assigned terms are compared against a carefully crafted "gold standard". The "gold standard" of subject index terms is developed through input of professional catalogue librarians, end users who are experts in the subject at hand, end users who are inexperienced in the subject, as well as automated subject indexers.
    2. The evaluation takes place in the context of actual information retrieval. This step involves end users conducting actual searching on the indexed collection of resources and marking how relevant each retrieved resource is. The analysis also includes looking at what caused the retrieval of the document at hand: a cataloguer's term, subject expert's term, inexperienced user's term or an automated term.
    3. Third, the quality of computer-assisted indexing is evaluated in the context of an indexing workflow. Methodology is also enriched by log analysis and questionnaires to help contextualize the results.
  • 39.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Soergel, Dagobert
    University of Buffalo, USA.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wales, UK.
    Managing classification in libraries: a methodological outline for evaluating automatic subject indexing and classification in Swedish library catalogues2015In: Classification & authority control: expanding resource discovery - proceedings of the International UDC Seminar 2015, 29-30 october, Lisbon, Portugal / [ed] Aida Slavic, Maria Inês Cordeiro, Würtzburg: Ergon-Verlag, 2015, p. 163-174Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40. Pesce, Valeria
    et al.
    Keizer, Johannes
    Protonotarios, Vassilis
    Stellato, Armando
    Celli, Fabrizio
    L’Abate, Giovanni
    Matteis, Luca
    Bromley, Jane
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Deployment of linked agricultural data integration layer2014Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath .
    Lykke, Marianne
    University of Aalbo.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wale.
    Enhancing social tagging with automated keywords from the Dewey Decimal Classification2014In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 801-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore the potential of applying the Dewey Decimal Classification as an established knowledge organisation system for enhancing social tagging, with the ultimate purpose of improving subject indexing and information retrieval. Design/methodology/approach Over 11,000 Intute metadata records in politics were used. 28 politics students were each given 4 tasks, in which a total of 60 resources were tagged in two different configurations, one with uncontrolled social tags only and another with uncontrolled social tags as well as suggestions from a controlled vocabulary. The controlled vocabulary was Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) comprising also mappings from the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). Findings The results demonstrate the importance of controlled vocabulary suggestions for indexing and retrieval: to help produce ideas of which tags to use, to make it easier to find focus for the tagging, to ensure consistency and to increase the number of access points in retrieval. The value and usefulness of the suggestions proved to be dependent on the quality of the suggestions, both as to conceptual relevance to the user and as to appropriateness of the terminology. Originality/value No research has investigated the enhancement of social tagging with suggestions from the Dewey Decimal Classification, an established knowledge organisation system, in a user trial, comparing social tagging only and social tagging enhanced with the suggestions. This paper is a final reflection on all aspects of the study.

  • 42.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Globalization challenges for knowledge organization systems (KOSs)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Project methodology in subject-based knowledge organization: experiences from the UK2014In: Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) Proceedings, 2014, Vol. 13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management may involve a wide variety of methodologies depending on numerous factors such as sponsors, scope, stakeholders etc. This particular workshop will draw on experience from three research projects in the area of subject-based knowledge organization, all with the same funder (JISC – Joint Information Systems Committee) but different scopes and deliverables, stakeholders, time frame and international project teams. It will discuss various components of project management such as planning, catering for the funder/stakeholder needs and requirements, communication, delivering on time etc. This will include writing project documentation such as proposals, progress and final reports as well as project-specific deliverables. The workshop will draw on theories of project management as applied to the three specific research projects. While the projects are in the same broad subject area of knowledge organization, it aims to demonstrate general research-project methodology.

  • 44.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Subject access to information: an interdisciplinary approach2014 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the research of experts from the fields of computing and library science, this ground-breaking work will show you how to combine two very different approaches to classification to create more effective, user-friendly information-retrieval systems.

    A much-needed analysis of the intersection of information organization and technology, this interdisciplinary work encompasses both current and potential methods of organizing information by subject. It examines traditional approaches as they are used in the online environment and explores computer science approaches, such as ontologies and automated tools for subject information organization. Entries review the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches, showcase their applications today, and project what those applications may be in the future.Content ranges from background on the importance of information organization in general to the importance of information organization by subject in particular. Traditional and modern knowledge-organization systems are covered, as are technological standards, selected topics in automated tools, and interdisciplinary research and cooperation. By tackling varied approaches, the work provides you with an appreciation of the tools—and an understanding of common aims.

    Features

    • Provides an interdisciplinary overview of current and potential approaches to organizing information by subject
    • Covers both pure computer science and pure library science topics in easy-to-understand language accessible to audiences from both disciplines
    • Reviews technological standards for representation, storage, and retrieval of varied knowledge-organization systems and their constituent elements
    • Suggests a collaborative approach that will reduce duplicate efforts and make it easier to find solutions to practical problems
  • 45.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    The University of Bath.
    Muller, Henk
    The University of Bath.
    Tonkin, Emma
    The University of Bath.
    Technologies for metadata extraction2014In: Handbook of Metadata, Semantics and Ontologies, World Scientific, 2014, p. 487-522Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of Glamorgan.
    Zeng, Marcia Lei
    Kent State University.
    Zumer, Maja
    University of Ljubljana.
    Terminology registries for knowledge organization systems: Functionality, use, and attributes2014In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 2330-1635, E-ISSN 2330-1643, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 1901-1916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terminology registries (TRs) are a crucial element of the infrastructure required for resource discovery services, digital libraries, Linked Data, and semantic interoperability generally. They can make the content of knowledge organization systems (KOS) available both for human and machine access. The paper describes the attributes and functionality for a TR, based on a review of published literature, existing TRs, and a survey of experts. A domain model based on user tasks is constructed and a set of core metadata elements for use in TRs is proposed. Ideally, the TR should allow searching as well as browsing for a KOS, matching a user's search while also providing information about existing terminology services, accessible to both humans and machines. The issues surrounding metadata for KOS are also discussed, together with the rationale for different aspects and the importance of a core set of KOS metadata for future machine-based access; a possible core set of metadata elements is proposed. This is dealt with in terms of practical experience and in relation to the Dublin Core Application Profile.

  • 47.
    Pesce, Valeria
    et al.
    Global Forum on Agricultural Research (GFAR), Italy.
    L'Abate, Giovanni
    Consiglio per la Ricerca e la sperimentazione in Agricoltura Centro di ricerca per l’agrobiologia e la pedologia (CRA-ABP), Italy.
    Matteis, Luca
    agINFRA project.
    Golub, Koraljka
    agINFRA project.
    The agINFRA Linked Data layer2014In: Research Data Alliance 4th Plenary Meeting, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Golub, Koraljka
    University of Bath, United Kingdom.
    An overview of UKOLN work related to subject-based knowledge organization2013Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Miščančuk, Marija
    et al.
    Međimurje University of Applied Sciences.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Engleski jezik izborni: Drugi strani jezik početna razina učenja: Nastavni materijali: English language, facultative: Second foreign language, beginner´s level: teaching materials2013Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50. Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Novak, Blaženka
    Engleski kao glavni strani jezik naspram hrvatskoga kao materinjeg2013In: Zbornik radova Međimurskog veleučilišta u Čakovcu, ISSN 1849-1138, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 114
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