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  • 1.
    Archer, Trevor
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Physical exercise to determine resilience: Hormesic processes arising from physiologic perturbation2019In: Journal of Public Health and General Medicine, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The propensity for regular and repeated physical exercise to induce and maintain ahormesic effect upon health parameters over a broad range of disorder conditions through the progression of resilience to neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, stroke, sarcopenia, osteopenia, immunosenescence, and metabolic syndrome has been examined. Beyond the alleviation fragility, fatigue, stress-distress and selective vulnerability perturbations induced by different forms of physical exercise may induce hormesis and/or autophagy, through the disruption of homeostasis and manifestation of adaptive responses, to instigate multi-layered resilience. The hormesis challenges, accomplished through daily exercise, the promotion of resilience at molecular, cellular, tissue, e.g. muscle, and organ, e.g. brain, immune-functioning, bone material, physiological and behaviour-expressive levels, have been observed both from pathophysiological and etiogenetic dimensions. Regular exercise over extended periods (optimally years and decades, preferably lifelong) is expected to shift the inverted-U shaped hormesis curve to the right thereby conferred resistance to disease and ill-being and ensuring strength and health advantages. It seems likely that chronic, regular exercise, consisting of suitable proportions of endurance and resistance type, performed daily over months, years or decades ought to instigate some manner of ‘behavioural sensitization’ whereby the health benefits of equivalent levels of exercise escalate incrementally.

  • 2.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lärares kommunikativa ansatser under klassrumsdiskussioner om samhällsfrågor med naturvetenskapligt innehåll2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Undervisning kring samhällsfrågor med naturvetenskapligt innehåll, SNI, kännetecknas av att beaktande av en rad olika perspektiv, till exempel etiska och sociala, är viktiga vid sidan av kunskaper i och om naturvetenskap. Genom att ge eleverna möjligheter att diskutera och argumentera kring sina och andras perspektiv, kan de utveckla förståelse för frågornas komplexitet och bilda sig en personlig uppfattning i frågan. Tidigare forskning har visat att undervisning kring SNI med öppenhet för olika perspektiv och betydande inslag av elevdeltagande kan innebära stora utmaningar för lärare i naturvetenskap. Syftet med denna studie var att få kunskap om hur klassrumsdiskussioner om SNI kan utformas och genomföras för att främja målen med undervisningen. I studien deltog två gymnasielärare som undervisar i kursen Naturkunskap 1b i årskurs 1 på det Samhällsvetenskapliga programmet. Datamaterialet utgjordes av ljudinspelningar från fyra lektioner som innehöll diskussioner om SNI. Lärarnas användning av olika kommunikativa ansatser under lektionerna analyserades. De kommunikativa ansatserna kan beskrivas som interaktiva respektive icke-interaktiva samt inkluderande flera eller endast ett perspektiv på SNI-frågan. Resultaten synliggör på vilket sätt lärares användning av olika kommunikativa ansatser kan främja eller begränsa utrymmet för elevernas perspektiv i diskussioner om SNI och möjligheten att belysa komplexiteten i en SNI. Studien bidrar därmed med kunskap som kan användas vid överväganden om utformning och genomförande av undervisning kring SNI för att främja olika mål. Vidare föreslås att kommunikativa ansatser kan användas av lärare som ett analytiskt redskap för att reflektera kring och utveckla aspekter av undervisningspraktiken i relation till de mål de vill uppnå.

  • 3.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Positioning students as participants in discussions and decision-making on socioscientific issues (SSI)2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with socio-scientific issues, SSI, entails emphasizing classroom practices in which multiple sources of knowledge and diverse perspectives on the issues, including the students’ views, are explored. Such classroom practices aim to empower students to participate in decision-making on SSI. This can be accomplished by enhancing the students’ independence as learners and positioning them as legitimate participants in societal discussions on SSI. At the same time, it has been reported that teachers find it difficult to interact with students in ways that promote the students’ independence as learners and encourages them to voice their perspectives, while pursuing intended learning goals in terms of a predefined body of content knowledge. However, detailed studies on teachers’ interactions with students when dealing with SSI are scarce. The present study aims at providing knowledge of characteristics of teachers’ interactions with students that are relevant to the positioning of students in the SSI classroom. Data consisted of transcripts of audio-recorded interactions between an upper secondary school science teacher and six student groups dealing with a SSI on climate change. Positioning theory was used as a lens to analyze the transcripts with respect to the following research questions: 1) How are the students positioned as participants in the classroom? 2) How are the students positioned in relation to the issue under consideration? The results show that the teacher-student interactions supported or undermined students’ empowerment by making available or delimiting different positions for the students as participants in the classroom and in discussion and decision-making on SSI. The different positions sometimes align with disparate educational aims. Consequently, knowledge of how the teacher-student interactions functioned to position the students is suggested to support teachers to promote students’ pursuit of intended educational outcomes when dealing with SSI.

  • 4.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Students' positioning in the classroom: a study of teacher-student interactions in a socioscientific issue context2019In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 371-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education calls for emphasizing dialogic classroom practices that include students’ views together with multiple sources of knowledge and diverse perspectives on the issues. Such classroom practices aim to empower students to participate in decision-making on SSI. This can be accomplished by enhancing their independence as learners and positioning them as legitimate participants in societal discussions. However, this is a complex task for science teachers. In this study, we introduce positioning theory as a lens to analyse classroom discourse on SSI in order to enhance our knowledge of the manners by which teachers’ interactions with students make available or promote different positions for the students, that is, different parts for the students to play as participants, when dealing with SSI in the classroom. Transcripts of interactions between one teacher and six student groups, recorded during two lessons, were analysed with respect to the positioning of the students as participants in the classroom, and in relation to the SSI under consideration. The results show that the teacher-student interactions made available contrasting student positions. The students were positioned by the teacher or positioned themselves as independent learners or as dependent on the teacher. Furthermore, the students were positioned as affected by the issue but as spectators to public negotiations of the issue. Knowledge about the manner in which teacher-student interactions can function to position students seems important for dialogic classroom practices and the promotion of student positions that sustain the pursuit of intended educational outcomes.

  • 5.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Teachers’ management of classroom discussions on socioscientific issues2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education requires teachers to manage open-ended discussions in which multiple perspectives, including students’ personal viewpoints, are considered. While this is recognised as a complex task for science teachers, research on teachers’ management of classroom discourse regarding SSI is scarce. This study aims at providing knowledge significant for the advancement of classroom practices suitable for dealing with multiple perspectives, including students’ contributions. The concept of communicative approach and the concept of position were used as tools to analyse transcripts of two teachers’ management of whole class discussions on four different SSI. The teachers’ use of different communicative approaches for different purposes was analysed. How certain features of the discourse, such as the types of questions used, functioned to position the students as contributors to the discussions was also examined. The results show that multiple perspectives, including students’ contributions, were recognized through a complex interplay between communicative approaches that made available contrasting student positions. The results indicate that strategies to build instruction on students’ contributions are particularly important to promote students’ participation in classroom discussions on SSI. The results also show that the interplay between questions that request students’ personal viewpoints and questions that are targeted towards decision-making is important to consider in relation to the aims of SSI-based education.

  • 6.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Challenges faced by teachers implementing socio-scientific issues as core elements in their classroom practices2015In: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 159-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers may face considerable challenges when implementing socio‐scientific issues (SSI) in their classroom practices, such as incorporating student‐centred teaching practices and exploring knowledge and values in the context of socio-scientific issues. This year‐long study explores teachers’ reflections on the process of developing their classroom practices when implementing SSI. Video‐recorded discussions between two upper secondary school science teachers and an educational researcher, grounded in the teachers’ reflections on their classroom practices, provided data for the analysis. The results show that during the course of the implementation the teachers enhanced their awareness of the importance of promoting students’ participation and supporting their independence as learners. However, the results also suggest a conflict between the enactment of a student‐centred classroom practice and the achievement of intended learning goals. In order to accept the challenge of implementing SSI in the classroom, it is suggested that it is essential for teachers to build strategies, which integrate dialogue about learning goals.

  • 7.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Teachers’ challenges when faced with developing their practice through the integration of SSI2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bruun, Jesper
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Sweden;University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Network analysis and qualitative discourse analysis of a classroom group discussion2019In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 317-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new methodology is proposed for qualitative discourse analysis (QDA) aimed at gaining enhanced insights into learning possibilities and indicators that arise during classroom group discussions. The constitution of this new methodology has two principle components: a discourse analysis approach that aims to identify the relationships between content and group dynamics; and a network analysis (NA) approach that uses the same data to identify meaning-related structural dynamics found in the data. The proposed methodology pairs these two components to create a supplementary iterative interchange that facilitates the attainment of greater analytic insights than are achievable by either of the two components individually. The critical aspects of the methodology are illustrated and discussed using real classroom data in ways that provide a procedural exemplar. The strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology are also discussed.

  • 9.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Book review: Alister Jones, Anne Kim and Michael Reiss (Eds.) (2010). Ethics in the Science and Technology Classroom: A New Approach to Teaching and Learning,2011In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 927-929Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lindahl, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ethics or Morals: Understanding Students’ Values Related to Genetic Tests on Humans2009In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 1285-1311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To make meaning of scientific knowledge in such a way that concepts and values of the life-world are not threatened is difficult for students and laymen. Ethics and morals pertaining to the use of genetic tests for hereditary diseases have been investigated and discussed by educators, anthropologists, medical doctors and philosophers giving, at least in part, diverging results. This study investigates how students explain and understand their argumentation about dilemmas concerning gene testing for the purpose to reduce hereditary diseases. Thirteen students were interviewed about their views on this issue. Qualitative analysis was done primarily by relating students' argumentation to their movements between ethics and morals as opposing poles. Students used either objective or subjective knowledge but had difficulties to integrate them. They tried to negotiate ethic arguments using utilitarian motives and medical knowledge with sympathy or irrational and personal arguments. They discussed the embryo's moral status to decide if it was replaceable in a social group or not. The educational implications of the students' use of knowledge in personal arguments are discussed.

  • 11.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Hur möter vi information om hälsa och ohälsa?: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 1: Medicin och hälsa, gymnasieskolan ]2019Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Medicinsk etik och risk i undervisningen: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 6: Medicinsk etik och riskbedömning, gymnasieskolan ]2019Other (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Of pigs and men - Understanding students' reasoning about the use of pigs as donors for xenotransplantation2010In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 867-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education has a role in society to provide students with knowledge for their democratic participation in society as well as for a future profession. In science education, students encounter values that may be in conflict with their worldview. Such conflicts may for example lead to constructive reflections as well as rejection of scientific knowledge and technology. Students' ways of reasoning are important starting points for discussing problematic issues and may be crucial for constructive dialogues in the classroom. This study investigates students' reasoning about conflicting values concerning the human-animal relationship exemplified with the use of genetically modified pigs as organ donors for xenotransplantation. Students’ reasoning is analyzed using Giddens’ concepts of disembedded and embedded practices in parallel with moral philosophical theories in a framework based on human-animal relationships. Thirteen students were interviewed and their stances categorized. Kantian deontological and classical utilitarian ethics were found within the patronage and the partnership models. These students appreciated expert knowledge but those using the partnership model could not accept xenotransplantation if pigs were to be killed. Students using care ethics did not appreciate expert knowledge since it threatened naturalness. The results suggest that stances against the use of scientific knowledge are more problematic than knowledge per se, and that conflicting stances have similarities that present opportunities for understanding and development of students’ argumentation skills for future participation in societal discourse on utilizing expert knowledge. Furthermore it is suggested that science education could benefit from a higher awareness of the presence of different morals.

  • 14.
    Lindahl, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Of pigs and men: Understanding students' values regarding the use of GM-pigs as organ donors2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Tradition och vetenskap i medicinsk kunskap och praktik: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 1: Medicin och Hälsa, gymnasieskolan ]2019Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lindahl, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Understanding students' views on the human-animal relationship through the example of xenotransplantation2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Archer, Trevor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Göterborgs universitet.
    Depressive Expression and Anti-Depressive Protection in Adolescence: Stress, Positive Affect, Motivation and Self-Efficacy2013In: Psychology, ISSN 2152-7180, E-ISSN 2152-7199, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 495-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims at identifying predisposing and protective factors for the purpose of showing their respective contribution and interaction for adolescents’ stress disorders and depressive states, and to find key attributes for the identification of pupils at risk in a normal population of adolescents. The study was performed with 211 high-school pupils over a period of 18 months. The results are reported from the pupils participating in 4 consecutive administrations of the instruments (N = 115). The following instruments were used: “Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale”, “Stress”, “Helplessness”, “Hopelessness”, “Uppsala Sleep inventory”, “Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale”, “Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale”, “Life Orientation Test”, “General Self-Efficacy”, “Locus of Control”, “Situational Intrinsic Motivational Scale”. The Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale were also used to categorize participants into four affective profiles: “self-fulfilling”, high affective”, “low affective” and “self-destructive”. Linear regression analyses showed that situational depression (hopelessness) was predicted by depressive. Negative affect predicted stress, which in turn predicted general and situational depressiveness. General self-efficacy, positive affect and Identified regulation were found to be protective factors to both general and situational depressiveness. Depressiveness was found to be linked to the “self-destructive” affective personality type. “Negative affect” and distractiveness are suggested as markers for pupils at risk, whereas positive affect, self-efficacy and identified regulation appear to have protecting roles.

  • 18.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Bruun, Jesper
    Institut for Naturfagenes Didaktik, Denmark.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Integrating text-mining, network analysis and thematic discourse analysis to produce maps of student discussions about sustainability2016In: A methodological approach to PER, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a combination of network analysis (NA), text-mining (TM) techniques, and thematic discourse  analysis  (TDA)  to  characterise  and compare  student  discussions  about sustainable development. Three student groups at three different times were analysed. The analysis entails an iterative design where NA, TM, and TDA continuously inform each other to produce a rich and coherent picture of the discussions. The output of such an analysis is a  set  of  maps  of  these  discussions,  which  have both  qualitative  and  quantitative  uses. Qualitatively, the maps show how thematic patterns in the discussions are related for each group,  and  we can  see  how  discourses  differ  between  groups  as  well  as  over  time. Quantitatively,  we  use  network  motif  analysis,  entropy  based measures,  and  degree distributions to distinguish between discussions.

  • 19.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Attitude and language use in peer-group discussions and the impact on students’ texts2016In: Kroppsligt lärande i naturvetenskaplig undervisning. FND 2016, Forskning i Naturvetenskapernas Didaktik, 9-10 November, Falun, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Attitudes and language shaping the SSI discussion2015In: ESERA 2015, The 11th Biannual Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA): Science Education Research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Socio-scientific Issues (SSI) in science education aiming at fostering critical thinking and decision-making capacities is known to develop the quality of students’ socio-scientific arguments. Teachers scaffolding has been shown to be important for the quality of students’ reasoning. Although students’ untutored socio-scientific discussions are recognized as important for reasoning quality, little is known about these interactions among peers. Such information is crucial for further development of teachers’ scaffolding. The aim of this study is to explore the underpinnings of student discussions on SSI in order to develop understanding for key aspects with importance for the faith of students’ decision-making conversation. Data were transcribed discussions from 4 groups of Swedish high-school students discussing “Wolves in Sweden and biodiversity”. Our theoretical framework builds on Dewey’s notion of Open-mindedness and Bernstein’s communication codes. Students’ inputs interrupting or re-vitalizing conversations were coded as Open-minded/Close-minded (OM/CM) and Elaborated/Restricted code (Ec/Rc) and their functions interpreted. In some utterances (Morals and Agitational talk) the use of Ec were found to interrupt or narrow the conversation. CM utterances (Morals and Opinions) typically interrupted conversation, something that has to be counteracted by teachers by encouraging students’ Open-mindedness in order to promote a multifaceted informal socio-scientific discussion.

  • 21.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues2015In: NARST 2015, Annual International Conference of National Association for Research in Science Teaching: Becoming Next Generation Science Educators in an Era of Global Science Education Reform, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Socio-scientific Issues (SSI) in science education aiming at fostering critical thinking and decision-making capacities is known to develop the quality of students’ socio-scientific arguments. Teachers scaffolding has been shown to be important for the quality of students’ reasoning. Although students’ untutored socio-scientific discussions are recognized as important for reasoning quality, little is known about these interactions among peers. Such information is crucial for further development of teachers’ scaffolding. The aim of this study is to explore the underpinnings of student discussions on SSI in order to develop understanding for key aspects with importance for the faith of students’ decision-making conversation. Data were transcribed discussions from 4 groups of Swedish high-school students discussing “Wolves in Sweden and biodiversity”. Our theoretical framework builds on Dewey’s notion of Open-mindedness and Bernstein’s communication codes. Students’ inputs interrupting or re-vitalizing conversations were coded as Open-minded/Close-minded (OM/CM) and Elaborated/Restricted code (Ec/Rc) and their functions interpreted. In some utterances (Morals and Agitational talk) the use of Ec were found to interrupt or narrow the conversation. CM utterances (Morals and Opinions) typically interrupted conversation, something that has to be counteracted by teachers by encouraging students’ Open-mindedness in order to promote a multifaceted informal socio-scientific discussion.

  • 22.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues2016In: urasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, ISSN 1305-8215, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 283-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The school systems of many countries have been pervaded by student-centred pedagogy making students’ small group discussion a common feature of the classroom practice. However, there is a lack of studies focussing different modes of discussion for the purpose of finding out whether some modes are more beneficial than others. Hence, the aim of this study is to explore the underpinnings of student small group conversations on Socio-scientific Issues in order to develop an understanding of the key aspects of what interrupts or revitalizes the conversation. We focus on the importance of attitudes and language use for the fate of students’ decision-making conversations. Our theoretical framework builds on Dewey’s notion of Open-mindedness and Bernstein’s communication codes. Students’ use of morals, opinions and agitational talk interrupted conversations, whereas new aspects and new perspectives revitalized the conversation. Students need guidance to avoid using justifications in conjunction with a Close-minded attitude.

  • 23.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Can we let computers change practice? Educators’ interpretations of preschool tradition2012In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1728-1737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of ICT into preschool practice is generally lagging. However, there is a variation regarding use of new technology. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze which are the possibilities and difficulties to embed computers into preschool practice. Data consists of naturalistic texts from 31 preschool teacher students revealing their experiences from trying to embed computers into practice. Analysis of data was guided by a framework adapted from Giddens’ structuration theory, focussing on students’ drawing on tradition and on knowledge claims when justifying their stances. Results show ambivalence to computer use. However, two groups of students emerged. One group embraced the new technology, whereas the other group conceived new technology as a threat to tradition. Depending on how activities are interpreted to fit into preschool tradition, using computers can or cannot be justified. Understanding tradition, as partially values and partially routines, provides possibilities to modify preschool practice to include computer activities. Knowledge claims, for example pertaining to developmental stimulation, can also be used as justifications for embedding computers into preschool practice. If, however, values appear to be threatened, tradition as well as knowledge claims can be used to justify protection against using computers in preschool practice.

  • 24.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    ICT in preschool: friendor foe? The significance of norms in a changing practice2012In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 422-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal change and prescriptions in curricula demand a change in educationalpractice. This can create conflicts between practitioners’ usual practices (norms)and those prescribed by curricula. One example is the introduction of Informationand Communication Technology (ICT) into preschool practice. Hence, our aim isto analyse how norms are used as arguments for or against using computers inpreschool practice. Data consist of naturalistic texts from 31 preschool teacherstudents revealing their experiences in attempting to embed computers intopractice. Results show ambivalence to computer use. Two lines of argumentsemerged: one embracing the new technology, the other rejecting this newtechnology. The following arguments were made to justify ICT in preschool: thechild as a citizen, the competent child and the active child. Concern wasexpressed between the teacher’s need for control and the child’s need forindependence and guidance.

  • 25.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    On attitude and language in students’ talk and their impact on students’ texts.2016In: Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, ISSN 1305-8215, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 2199-2221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ learning is assumed to be promoted through peer-group discussion. Most studies show the presence of qualitative improvements in either oral or written reasoning as a result of such interactions. However, knowledge on the relationship between talk qualities and text qualities is scarce. We adopt an explorative design using statistical analyses of students’ talk and texts to estimate the relationships between theoretically-based concepts of attitude and sociolinguistic code. The operationalized concepts can be validated using statistical analyses. Linear regression shows that Elaborated code in students’ talk has no impact on students’ texts. Furthermore, Restricted code in talk is detrimental to students’ use of Elaborated code in texts. This relationship is also found at the group level. Students’ expression of open-mindedness in their texts depends on their use of Elaborated code. Teachers must support students in using Elaborated code in their texts and avoiding Restricted code in their talk.

  • 26.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Zeidler, Dana
    University of South Florida, USA.
    Students' recognition of the educational demands in a socioscientific issue task2017In: Research, Practice and Collaboration in Science Education, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ difficulties in interpreting what counts as knowledge have been addressed in past educational research. As curricula have changed towards progressivist pedagogy the difficulties have deepened. The Socioscientific Issues framework exemplifies this development. It integrates different knowledges and discourses, implying diffuse boundaries between them, which in turn deepen students’ difficulties to interpret what is expected from them. Our aim is to explore students’ recognition of what meaning they are requested to produce in a context with weak boundaries between discourses. We use Bernstein’s concepts of recognition rules and classification to analyse how 15-16 year-old students develop their discussions in groups of 4-6 students. Students recognizing the educational demands integrate different discourses in their discussion and use both universalistic and particularistic meanings to produce new understandings. Students who do not understand the recognition rules keep discourses apart as in a traditional school task, answering questions or just exchanging personal opinions. And, by keeping universalistic and particularistic meanings apart the dynamics of an exploring SSI discussion is inhibited and the development of socioscientific reasoning is inhibited.

  • 27.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Zeidler, Dana L.
    University of South Florida, USA.
    Students' recognition of educational demands in the context of a socioscientific issues curriculum2019In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, ISSN 0022-4308, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ difficulties in interpreting what counts as knowledge have been addressed in past research on science education. The implementation of progressivist pedagogy in terms of more student-active classroom practice and the introduction of a variety of discourses into the science classroom deepens students’ difficulties.The integration of different forms and demands of knowledge and discourses typified by Science-in-Context initiatives, such as within the Socioscientific framework, exemplifies this development in science education. Here, the diffuse boundaries between school subjects and other silos of knowledge leads to considerable difficulties for students to interpret what is expected from them. Such contexts having diffuse boundaries between, for example, subject discourses and other fonts of knowledge, have been describes as contexts with weak classification. The present study aims to explore students’ interpretation of what knowledge or meaning they are requested to produce in contexts with weak classification, here exemplified withinan SSI-task. We use Bernstein’s concepts of recognition rulesand classificationto analyse how 15-16 year-old students develop their discussions in groups of 4-6 students. This study reports how students’ recognitionof the educational demands enabled integration of different discourses in their discussion, and that the use of both universalistic and particularistic meanings can produce new understandings. Students who had not acquired recognition ruleswere found to keep discourses apart, expressed either as rejection of the relevance of the task, answering questions as in a traditional school task, or just exchange of personal opinions. Furthermore, they included discourses irrelevant to the issue.An important outcome of the study was that socioscientific thinking was hampered when students kept universalistic and particularistic meanings apart. This hampering results from the inhibition of dynamic exploration during SSI discussions. The results provide new insights with relevance for teachers’ guiding students towards a fruitful SSI-discourse.

  • 28.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Norms, knowledge claims and authorities as justifications in students' reasoning about using new technology in societal practice2011In: Science & Culture: Promise, Challenge and Demand, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how students draw on norms, knowledge claims and authorities when reasoning about socioscientific issues. The aim of the study is to provide an image of students' sense of agency and how they handle trust and security issues by referring to the above mentioned modalities of the societal structures ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ (Giddens 1984). Examples from gene technology were used as the subject for interviews with 13 Swedish high-school students (year 11, age 17-18). At the time for interviews, the students had participated in and completed an introductory course in genetics which included a group discussion about genetic diseases and ethics. A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used for analysis of interviews. Students were found to use both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify acceptance or rejection of new technology. By doing that, they showed how norms as well as knowledge claims can be used to justify opposing position as they were trying to build trust in either science and technology or in experts. It was found that students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on their having or lacking appropriate knowledge. Students were also found to have difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms). Attention is drawn to the problem of students' using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation). Furthermore, students' sense of agency appears to be dependent on sharing norms with experts.

  • 29.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Students' Ontological Security and Agency in Science Education: An Example from Reasoning about the Use of Gene Technology2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 14, p. 2299-2330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a study of how students’ reasoning about socioscientific issues is framed by three dynamics: societal structures, agency and how trust and security issues are handled. Examples from gene technology were used as the forum for interviews with 13 Swedish highschool students (year 11, age 17–18). A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used to structure the analysis. The results illustrate how the participating students used both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify positions that accept or reject new technology. The analysis also showed how norms and knowledge can be used to justify opposing positions in relation to building trust in science and technology, or in democratic decisions expected to favour personal norms. Here, students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on perceptions of the knowledge base that the authority was seen to be anchored in. Difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms) was also found. These outcomes are used to draw attention to the educational challenges associated with students’ using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation) and how this is related to the development of a sense of agency in terms of sharing norms with experts or with laymen.

  • 30.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Students' reasoning about using new technology and the change of societal practice.2011In: Science Learning & Citizenship, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how students' reasoning about socioscientific issues is framed by their notion of societal structures, for the purpose to provide an image of their sense of agency and how they handle trust and security issues. Examples from gene technology were used as the subject for interviews with 13 Swedish high-school students (year 11, age 17-18). A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used for analysis. Students used both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify acceptance or rejection of new technology. Doing that, they showed how norms as well as knowledge can be used to justify opposing position as they were trying to build trust in either science and technology or in democratic decisions expected to favour their norms. It was found that students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on their having or lacking appropriate knowledge. Students were also found to have difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms). Attention is drawn to the problem of students' using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation). Furthermore, students' sense of agency appears to be dependent on either sharing norms with experts or with laymen.

  • 31.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala Universitet.
    The nature - nurture conflict: a part of biology education?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through historical discourses the boundaries between the concepts “nature” and “nurture” have been blurred, thus hampering the understanding of conflicts in contemporary debates on, for example, medicine and gene technology. In education, such conflicts between nature and nurture are brought to the fore, and without promoting the understanding of the multiple meanings of these concepts and their roles in societal discourse the goals to develop students’ socioscientific decision-making seem unattainable. This study problematizes students’ use of “nature” and “naturalness” to further the development of the experience of science education in relation to the nature-nurture debate. We build on the social constructivism view that present conceptions of nature and naturalness emanate from historical and modern social constructions of nature. Data were collected from interviews with 33 upper secondary school students (16-19 years) from 4 classes. Students’ claims or explanations that actualized the control of human actions pertaining to treatments for hereditary diseases by making use of concepts of “nature” and “naturalness were analysed. Within the Enlightenment view and the Romantic view, the students suggested control of human activity on different levels of biological organisation. The Romantic concept of nature was described by referring to the balance in nature (population level), the purity of nature (organism and cellular levels), and the laws of nature (gene level). Students holding the Enlightenment view of nature presented the imperfection of nature (organism, cellular and gene levels) as a common phenomenon. Here, nurture was considered natural to overcome such imperfections. Apparently, the Enlightenment view allows the embedding of nurture into nature by use of knowledge, in contrast to the preserving and moral stance held within the Romantic view. These conflicting views should be addressed in biological education to promote students’ understanding of contemporary discourses dependent on the different concepts of nature and nurture.

  • 32.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    What’s natural about nature? Deceptive concepts in socio-scientific decision-making2015In: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 250-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conflicts between nature and nurture are brought to the fore and challenges socio-scientific decision-making in science education. The multitude of meanings of these concepts and their roles in societal discourses can impede students’ development of understanding for different perspectives, e.g. on gene technology. This study problematizes students’ use of “nature” and “naturalness” to further the development of the experience of science education in relation to the nature-nurture debate. We build on the social constructivism view that present conceptions of nature and naturalness emanate from historical and modern social constructions of nature. Claims presented by upper secondary school students in interviews actualizing the control of human actions pertaining to treatments for hereditary diseases by making use of concepts of “nature” and “naturalness were analysed. The students suggested control of human activity on different levels of biological organisation, either from within the Romantic view or the Enlightenment view on nature. The Romantic view provided students with moral grounds for consistently preserve what is considered as nature and means to bolster their reasoning by referring to the balance in nature, the purity of nature, and the laws of nature. The Enlightenment view provided students with means to support gene technology by embedding “nurture” into the concept “nature” by using knowledge while implying that nurture is a natural way to overcome such imperfections of nature. We propose that these conflicting views should be addressed in biological education to promote students’ understanding of contemporary discourses dependent on the different concepts of nature and nurture.

  • 33.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Att göra etiska överväganden kring stoff och arbetssätt kring medicinska frågor: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Medicin, hälsa och ohälsa, Del 3: Etik i klassrummet, gymnasieskolan ]2019Other (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    How do 15-16 year old students use scientific knowledge to justify their reasoning about human sexuality and relationships?2016In: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, Vol. 60, no November, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to advance our understanding about the roles studentsassign to expert knowledge, the present study addresses how secondaryschool students use their knowledge of scientific disciplines in theirreasoning of socioscientific issues (SSI). Through group discussions, theresults show that students use science either as a sole justification orintegrated with other kinds of knowledge. Using expert knowledge to liftproblems out of the limited local contexts and find solutions, thestudents access the freedom to make personal choices. Thus, it wasconcluded that scientific knowledge provides possibilities for decisionsthat can support students' agency.

  • 35.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Theorell, T
    Lindblad, F
    Test performance and self-esteem in relation to experienced stress in Swedish sixth and ninth graders - saliva cortisol levels and psychological reactions to demands2005In: Acta paediatrica, Vol. 94 (4), p. 489-495Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Lindblad, F
    et al.
    Lindahl, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Theorell, T
    von Scheele, B
    Physiological stress reactions in 6th and 9th graders during test performance2006In: Stress and health, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Experiences and their role in Science Education2005In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lundin, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Negotiating the relevance of laboratory work: Safety, procedures and accuracy  brought to the fore in science education2014In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This text addresses the problem of the discrepancy between teachers’ and students’ positions in negotiations about the authenticity and legitimacy of school science activities. The study focuses on the apparent conflicts concerning legitimacy and authenticity when teachers and students bring attention to safety, authenticity and accuracy during issues laboratory activities. The analysed data are excerpts made from video observations in two science classes. Analysis was made using epistemological moves describing how teachers and students make their activities relevant. The result indicates that in the classroom conversation about laboratory practice, teachers sometimes draw the attention to safety, procedures and accuracy to legitimize the activity and how they try to control it. Negotiations concerning the legitimacy and authenticity of activities seem inevitable. Unless understandable agreements are reached, the negotiations jeopardize a successful understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS). Misunderstanding of the authenticity of activities contributes to a reduction of their legitimacy, and undermining teaching of context independent knowledge.

  • 39.
    Nielsen, Jan Alexis
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindahl, MatsLinnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Research, Practice and Collaboration in Science Education: Part 8: Scientific Literacy and Socio Scientific Issues2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Åkerblom, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Authenticity and the relevance of discourse and figured worlds in secondary students' discussions of socioscientific issues2017In: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, Vol. 65, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how authenticity influences students' discussions of socio-scientific issues (SSI). The students were found to bridge school knowledge and everyday knowledge, i.e. enter a "third space", in their explorative discussions. When the SSI task changed into a decision-making discussion for communication with an authentic stakeholder, the students excluded many perspectives. In the process, authenticity caused a loss of relevance for one discourse and several figured worlds, including the students' emotional reasoning. While losing emotional aspects, students' reasoning became more precise when grounded in rational reasoning, supporting well-informed decisions.

  • 41.
    Åkerblom, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Solving the Relevance Problem with Socioscientific Issues and Students' Perceived Authenticity2016In: Science and Technology Education for a Peaceful and Equitable World, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 41 of 41
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