lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 184
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aeberhard, Marc
    et al.
    LLuxury Hotel & Spa Management Ltd, Switzerland.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Krause, Mario
    Deutsches Zentrum für Individualisierte Prävention und Leistungsverbesserung, Germany.
    Meurer, Jörg
    KEYLENS Management Consultants, Germany.
    Luxury Relevance of Selected Megatrends in Tourism2020In: Luxury Tourism: Market Trends, Changing Paradigms, and Best Practices / [ed] Roland Conrady;David Ruetz;Marc Aeberhard, Springer, 2020, p. 213-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability, digitalization, demographic change, and health are some of the most important megatrends in the tourism sector. The contributions in this chapter, therefore, focus on their relevance in the context of luxury travel. Four authors have their say, based on their many years of practical experience in the various fields, who can give a profound account of the specific characteristics of these megatrends and why they are relevant. Stefan Gössling concisely describes from a human ecological perspective whether luxury tourism is compatible with the sustainable use of resources and ecosystems. Marc Aeberhard discusses in his contribution whether the immaterial part of the phenomenon of luxury is compatible with the demands for more and more digitalization. Jörg Meurer vividly demonstrates how demographic change is creating new target groups for luxury and premium brands and how these target groups are gaining a completely new and exciting relevance. Finally, Mario Krause places the aspect of health as an immaterial factor in relation to luxury (and travel), setting an important accent as a counterpoint to the ubiquitous phenomenon of wellness.

  • 2. Andersen, Otto
    et al.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Simonsen, Morten
    Walnum, Hans Jakob
    Peeters, Paul
    Neiberger, Cordula
    CO2-emissions from the transport of China’s exported goods.2010In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 5790-5798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions of greenhouse gases in many European countries are declining, and the European Union (EU) believes it is on track in achieving emission reductions as agreed upon in the Kyoto Agreement and the EU's more ambitious post-Kyoto climate policy. However, a number of recent publications indicate that emission reductions may also have been achieved because production has been shifted to other countries, and in particular China. If a consumption perspective is applied, emissions in industrialized countries are substantially higher, and may not have declined at all. Significantly, emissions from transports are omitted in consumption-based calculations. As all trade involves transport, mostly by cargo ship, but also by air, transports add considerably to overall emissions growth incurred in production shifts. Consequently, this article studies the role of transports in creating emissions of CO2, based on the example of exports from China. Results are discussed with regard to their implications for global emission reductions and post-Kyoto negotiations.

  • 3.
    Bausch, Thomas
    et al.
    Free Univ Bozen Bolzano, Italy.
    Humpe, Andreas
    Munich Univ Appl Sci, Germany.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Does Climate Change Influence Guest Loyalty at Alpine Winter Destinations?2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 15, p. 1-22, article id 4233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has dealt extensively with different aspects of climate change and winter tourism such as the impact on ski resorts and ski lift operators, adaptation strategies, governance at destinations and reactions of winter sports guests to changing snow conditions. This paper goes deeper into the question of destination choice and examines the role of climate change among the many factors affecting guest loyalty at Alpine winter destinations. The study uses an established destination choice model with choice sets, destination image and dynamic feedback loop. A qualitative online forum identifies factors influencing winter destination choice, followed by a quantitative survey which compares Alpine winter holidaymakers categorised as loyal, disloyal and undecided. The results demonstrate that climate change clearly influences destination choice, but snow sports are not the only affected attractors. Enjoyment of the natural environment and value for money are just as high on the list of guest motivators. This indicates that climate change adaptation measures such as snowmaking can be counterproductive to guest loyalty because they spoil the natural scenery and raise prices. The paper concludes with a recommendation for winter destinations to prioritize conservation of the natural environment and integrate more environmental protection measures into their management strategies.

  • 4.
    Choi, Andy S.
    et al.
    National Institute of Ecology, Republic of Korea;University of Queensland, Australia.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Queensland, Australia.
    Ritchie, Brent W.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Flying with climate liability?: economic valuation of voluntary carbon offsets using forced choices2018In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 62, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to examine how key aspects of voluntary climate action influence economic values of aviation carbon offsets using an Australian case study, where voluntary carbon offset programs for the aviation sector were active under a carbon tax between July 01, 2012 and July 17, 2014. An online survey was administered during the period using choice experiments. This rare and short-lived Australian experience is useful to gain insights into how individuals respond to the new public policy in terms of the perceived economic value of voluntary offsets for air travel. According to the estimation results, supporters of the mandatory tax policy held a welfare value of voluntary carbon offsets for their domestic flights that is three times larger than non-supporters (i.e., $AU27.83 vs. $AU9.40). It is $AU12.27 on average per ton of carbon offsets per person for domestic flights and $AU0.92 for international long-haul flights. The findings endorse that individuals seem to attach personal responsibility for carbon emissions (i.e. climate liability or carbon conscience) to frequent domestic flights, but not so much to intercontinental flights. Furthermore, reported flight frequencies by respondents did not place any significant impact on economic values of voluntary carbon offsets in both domestic and international frameworks. A coupled approach between forced choices and certainty responses was adapted, where no-choice options were retrieved, potentially improving choice experiments. Results suggest that airlines should consider simplifying their carbon offset programs to fixed levels (e.g. £3, £10, and £20 as in the case of British Airways), regardless of geographical boundaries, while governments should promote both mandatory and voluntary climate measures in tandem.

  • 5. C.M, Hall
    et al.
    D, Scott
    Gössling, Stefan
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Tourism, Development and Climate Change2009In: Disaster Prevention in Tourism: Climate Justice and Tourism / [ed] D'Mello, C., Minninger, S. and McKeown, J., Chiang Mai: Ecumenical Coalition On Tourism and German Church Development Service (EED) , 2009, p. 136-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Cohen, Scott A
    et al.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University.
    A darker side of hypermobility2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1660-1679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the formulation of the mobilities paradigm, research has shown that movement is increasingly at the heart of our social identities. This paper argues that mobility, and indeed, hypermobility, constitutes to a growing extent who we are, whilst societal perspectives on mobility increasingly dictate how we need to move in time and space in order to accrue network capital. In this critical review, deeply embedded mechanisms of the social glamorization of mobility are uncovered, and juxtaposed with what we call a ‘darker side’ of hypermobility, including the physiological, psychological, emotional and social costs of mobility for individuals and societies. The paper concludes that whilst aspects of glamorization in regard to mobility are omnipresent in our lives, there exists an ominous silence with regard to its darker side.

  • 7.
    Cohen, Scott A.
    et al.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Hanna, Paul
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Lund University.
    The dark side of business travel: a media comments analysis2018In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, no part B, p. 406-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The publication of 'A darker side of hypermobility' (Cohen and Gössling, 2015), which reviewed the personal and social consequences of frequent travel, led to considerable media coverage and sparking of the public imagination, particularly with regards to the impacts of business travel. It featured in more than 85 news outlets across 17 countries, engendering over 150,000 social media shares and 433 media comments from readers, with the latter a source of insight into how the public reacts online when faced with an overview of the negative sides of frequent business travel. The present paper is theoretically framed by the role of discourse in social change and utilises discursive analysis as a method to evaluate this body of media comments. Our analysis finds two key identities are performed through public responses to the explicit health and social warnings concerned with frequent business travel: the 'flourishing hypermobile' and the 'floundering hypermobile'. The former either deny the health implications of frequent business travel, or present strategies to actively overcome them, while the latter seek solace in the public dissemination of the health warnings: they highlight their passivity in the construction of their identity as hypermobile and its associated health implications. The findings reveal a segment of business travellers who wish to reduce travel, but perceive this as beyond their locus of control. Business travel reductions are thus unlikely to happen through the agency of individual travellers, but rather by changes in the structural factors that influence human resource and corporate travel management policies. 

  • 8.
    Cohen, Scott A.
    et al.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Higham, James E. S.University of Otago, New Zealand.Gössling, StefanLinnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden.Peeters, PaulNHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands.
    Understanding and Governing Sustainable Tourism Mobility: Psychological and Behavioural Approaches.2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing contribution to climate change, tourist and traveller behaviour is currently not acknowledged as an important sector within the development of climate policy. Whilst tourists may be increasingly aware of potential impacts on climate change there is evidence that most are unwilling to modify their actual behaviours. Influencing individual behaviour in tourism and informing effective governance is therefore an essential part of climate change mitigation.

    This significant volume is the first to explore the psychological and social factors that may contribute to and inhibit sustainable change in the context of tourist and traveller behaviour. It draws on a range of disciplines to offer a critical review of the psychological understandings and behavioural aspects of climate change and tourism mobilities, in addition to governance and policies based upon psychological, behavioural and social mechanisms. It therefore provides a more informed understanding of how technology, infrastructure and cost distribution can be developed in order to reach stronger mitigation goals whilst ensuring that resistance from consumers for socio-psychological reasons are minimized.

    Written by leading academics from a range of disciplinary backgrounds and regions this ground breaking volume is essential reading for all those interested in the effective governance of tourism’s contribution to climate change now and in the future.

  • 9.
    Cohen, Scott A.
    et al.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Higham, James E.S.
    University of Otago, New Zealand ; Norwegian School of Hotel Management, Norway.
    Peeters, Paul
    Breda University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden.
    Why tourism mobility behaviours must change2014In: Understanding and governing sustainable tourism mobility: psychological and behavioural approaches / [ed] Scott A. Cohen, James E.S. Higham, Paul Peeters and Stefan Gössling, London: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Cohen, Scott A.
    et al.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Higham, James
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University ; Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Peeters, Paul
    NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands.
    Eijgelaar, Eke
    NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands.
    Finding effective pathways to sustainable mobility: bridging the science-policy gap2016In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 24, no 3 Special issue, p. 317-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This overview paper examines three areas crucial to understanding why, despite clear scientific evidence for the growing environmental impacts of tourism transport, there is large-scale inertia in structural transitions and a lack of political will to enact meaningful sustainable mobility policies. These include the importance of addressing socio-technical factors, barriers posed by “technology myths” and the need to overcome “transport taboos” in policy-making. The paper seeks pathways to sustainable mobility by bridging the science–policy gap between academic research and researchers, and policy-makers and practitioners. It introduces key papers presented at the Freiburg 2014 workshop, covering the case for researcher engagement using advocacy and participatory approaches, the role of universities in creating their own social mobility policies, the power of social mechanisms encouraging long-haul travel, issues in consumer responsibility development, industry self-regulation and the operation of realpolitik decision-making and implementation inside formal and informal destination-based mobility partnerships. Overall, the paper argues that governments and the tourism and transport industries must take a more cautious approach to the technological optimism that fosters policy inertia, and that policy-makers must take a more open approach to implementing sustainable transport policies. A research agenda for desirable transport futures is suggested.

  • 11.
    Cohen, Scott
    et al.
    Univ Surrey, UK.
    Liu, Hongbo
    Univ Surrey, UK.
    Hanna, Paul
    Univ Surrey, UK.
    Hopkins, Debbie
    Univ Oxford, UK.
    Higham, James
    Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway;Lund University, Sweden.
    The Rich Kids of Instagram: Luxury Travel, Transport Modes, and Desire2022In: Journal of Travel Research, ISSN 0047-2875, E-ISSN 1552-6763, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 1479-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rich Kids of Instagram (RKOI) portray luxury lifestyles on social media. The potential roles of travel and transport within these online displays of affluence have not yet been examined. This paper's purpose is to analyse how transport modes and luxury travel are depicted and interrelated through RKOI images. Co-occurrence analyses were conducted using a data set of Instagram posts with RKOI as a hashtag (2012-2018) to visualize the roles of transport modes and luxury travel in RKOI image construction. The findings demonstrate that both energy-intensive transport modes and luxury travel, whether through air/watercraft or luxury cars, play a vital role in signaling RKOI's self-image on Instagram, with gendered differences. The article contributes an original conceptual model of how RKOI construct their image using transport modes and luxury travel. Implications for the social normalization of carbon-intensive transport choices, coupled with luxury destinations as a backdrop, are discussed.

  • 12.
    Dubois, Ghislain
    et al.
    TEC, France.
    Ceron, Jean-Paul
    CIRED, France.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Weather preferences of French tourists: lessons for climate change impact assessment2016In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 339-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism has complex relationships with weather and climate, and there is consensus that tourism could be substantially affected by climatic change. While considerable research has been presented on how climatic change is likely to affect destinations and tourism stakeholders in the future, there remains limited understanding of the weather preferences of tourists. This is a research priority if the implications of climatic change for the temporal and geographic patterns of tourism demand are to be assessed with more relevance. This paper presents the results of a survey (n = 1643 respondents) of the weather preferences of French tourists. Results show the ranking of weather and climate as a factor of destination choice and satisfaction. They also indicate the high tolerance of tourists to heat and even to heat waves, whereas rainy conditions appear to be clearly repulsive. The weight of precipitation in indices like the Tourism Comfort Index should therefore be upgraded. The findings are also compared with studies in other countries. Slight differences in similar surveys can lead to a discrepancy in the appreciation of excessive heat and associated thresholds by 2-3 degrees C, which might limit the possibility to base climate change impact assessment on such fragile data.

  • 13. Dubois, Ghislain
    et al.
    Peeters, Paul
    Ceron, Jean-Paul
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    The future tourism mobility of the world population: Emission growth versus climate policy.2011In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1031-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of global passenger transport is linked to tourism. The sector is therefore of interest in studying global mobility trends and transport-related emissions. In 2005, tourism was responsible for around 5% of all CO2 emissions, of which 75% were caused by passenger transport. Given the rapid growth in tourism, with 1.6 billion international tourist arrivals predicted by 2020 (up from 903 million in 2007), it is clear that the sector will contribute to rapidly growing emission levels, and increasingly interfere with global climate policy. This is especially true under climate stabilisation and “avoiding dangerous climate change” objectives, implying global emission reductions in the order of −50% to −80% by 2050, compared to 2000. Based on three backcasting scenarios, and using techniques integrating quantitative and qualitative elements, this paper discusses the options for emission reductions in the tourism sector and the consequences of mitigation for global tourism-related mobility by 2050. It ends with a discussion of the policy implications of the results.

  • 14.
    Fernandez, Sebastien
    et al.
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing and Tourism Studies (MTS). Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Martin-Rios, Carlos
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Fointiat, Valerie
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Pasamar, Susana
    Pablo de Olavide Univ, Spain.
    Isaac, Rami
    Breda Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Lunde, Merete
    Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    To tip or not to tip?: Explaining tipping behavior in restaurants with service-inclusive pricing2024In: International Journal of Hospitality Management, ISSN 0278-4319, E-ISSN 1873-4693, Vol. 117, article id 103640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tipping behavior is a vital way for waiting staff to enhance their wages, and for managers to monitor guest satisfaction. Despite its importance, there is not yet an established consensus on reasons why people tip. Our lack of understanding about tipping behavior is exacerbated by a strong reliance on studies conducted in countries that have a system of voluntary tipping (e.g., the United States). The study aims therefore at expanding our understanding of tipping behavior beyond voluntary tipping countries and more specifically explaining tipping behavior under service-inclusive pricing. Data obtained from 1458 guests in five European countries show that income and payment method are the strongest predictors of customers' decision to tip, whereas bill size is the most robust predictor of tip amount. Results advance knowledge by suggesting that social norm theory plays a major role to understand tipping behavior in service-inclusive pricing.

  • 15.
    Freytag, Tim
    et al.
    University of Freiburg.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University.
    Mössner, Samuel
    University of Freiburg.
    Living the green city: Freiburg’s Solarsiedlung between narratives and practices of urban sustainable development2014In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 644-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solar settlement (Solarsiedlung) in Freiburg, Germany, has been widely hailed as an eco-city or green city neighbourhood and a blueprint for sustainable urban development. However, as there is a noticeable lack of critical analysis of what constitutes Solarsiedlung as an “eco-city”, this paper studies narratives and practices of sustainable urban development. First, we look at Solarsiedlung as a best-practice model – a narrative that was produced and perpetuated by architects, urban planners, investors and academics celebrating this neighbourhood as a technologically leapfrogging, economically sound and socially integrated project. Second, we explore the everyday practices and lived experience of the residents in Solarsiedlung. Bringing together these two perspectives, we contribute to a more comprehensive understanding and critical reading of the interplay between the ecological, economic and social dimensions of sustainable development as seen from different viewpoints. Findings indicate that Solarsiedlung as a best-practice model is embedded in growth-oriented neoliberal strategies that are in conflict with the everyday practices and lived experience of the residents. Our findings put into question the widely assumed transferability of best-practice models in sustainable urban development.

  • 16.
    Garrod, Brian
    et al.
    University of Wales, UK.
    Gössling, StefanLund University.
    New frontiers in marine tourism: diving experiences, management and sustainability2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diving tourism has seen such growth in the past decade that the World Tourism Organization suggests it will soon become as important as ski tourism. According to a WTO estimate, there are now 5-7 million active certified divers in the world. Despite its development as a mass tourism activity, its dynamic growth and great economic importance, particularly for island destinations in the tropics, surprisingly few scientific publications address this form of special-interest tourism. In the light of this, “New Frontiers in Marine Tourism” is the first attempt to describe and analyse this tourism sector comprehensively.The first part of the book is devoted to an overview of the dive sector, addressing different types of diving locations and their particular characteristics, the geographical distribution of dive locations, the origins of dive tourists, as well as the growth and economic significance of diving tourism in destinations worldwide. In its second section, the book outlines different motivations and typologies of diving tourists, their learning behaviour, knowledge of marine environments, and their interaction with flora and fauna. The third section focuses on diver satisfaction, attitudes and preferences, diver education and interpretation, compliance with regulations by divers and tour operators, environmental impacts, and aspects of risk and health, thus highlighting a variety of pressing topics related to the management of diving tourism. 

  • 17.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Department of Service Management, Lund University.
    Advancing a Clinical Transport Psychology2013In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 19, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that mental disorders are a dimension so far largely overlooked in studies of transport behaviour and mobility consumption, even though they may to a considerable degree affect how we understand, value, and use different transport modes. Mental disorders include anxiety-, mood-, substance abuse-, and personality disorders, each of which affects only up to a few per cent of the population in industrialised countries. On an aggregated basis, however, mental illnesses influence large parts of the population. Based on an exploratory research approach, this article discusses how mental disorders affect, and are affected by, mobility consumption, also identifying social, political and/or institutional mechanisms that contribute to or validate mental disorders. It is argued that without a better understanding of these interrelationships, mobility consumption and -growth cannot be fully understood. Results are consequently of relevance for transport planning, the prevention of accidents, as well as the design of interventions to develop more sustainable transport systems.

  • 18.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Air transport and climate change2018In: The Routledge Companion to air transport management / [ed] Nigel Halpern & Anne Graham, London: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 402-416Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden ; Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Carbon management2015In: The Routledge handbook of tourism and sustainability / [ed] Stefan Gössling, C. Michael Hall & Daniel Scott, London: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 221-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon accounting The measurement and reporting of emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, including direct/indirect emissions. Depending on system boundaries, this can also include the supply chain.

  • 20.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Carbon Management in Tourism: Mitigating the Impacts on Climate Change2011Book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Gössling, Stefan
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Carbon neutral destinations a conceptual analysis: a conceptual analysis2009In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 17-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a critical review of the concept of “carbon neutrality” for tourism destinations within the framework of the UNWTO's Davos Declaration, a document ascribing responsibilities to various actors in the tourism industry to engage in greenhouse gas emission reductions. The paper assesses the planning frameworks of countries engaging with the concept, discusses the measures that can be taken to achieve “carbon neutrality”, along with an evaluation of some of the theoretical and practical implications. An increasing number of destinations now plan to become “carbon neutral”, often as a response strategy to pressure on the tourism industry to reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases. They aim to mitigate their contribution to global warming, and to develop their tourism industries by enhancing their image as being environmentally pristine and sustainable.

  • 22.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Case study: Climate change and tourism development2013In: The Ethics of Tourism: Critical and applied perspectives / [ed] Lovelock, Brent and Lovelock, Kirsten M., London: Routledge, 2013, p. 258-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway;Lund University, Sweden.
    Celebrities, air travel, and social norms2019In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 79, p. 1-13, article id 102775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The year 2018 saw the rise of a new global youth movement, Fridays for Future. The organization underlines the importance of personal accountability for greenhouse gas emissions, specifically in the context of air travel. This position is in stark contrast to views associating aeromobility with status. Celebrities in particular maintain personal brands based on frequent flying. This paper assesses the aeromobilities of celebrities, for which it develops a netnography-based methodology that tracks spatial movement on the basis of social media posts. Data is analyzed to determine travel patterns, distances flown, and fuel consumed. Findings are discussed in terms of the energy-intensity of celebrity lifestyles and the struggle over moral and social norms regarding personal accountability for contributions to climate change.

  • 24.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Climate Policy and Tourism2012In: Handbook of Tourism and the Environment / [ed] Holden, A. and Fennell, D., London: Routledge , 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Extending the theoretical grounding of mobilities research: transport psychology perspectives2023In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 167-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reconsiders the new mobilities paradigm and its relevance for the understanding of transport systems and behaviour. It argues that the mobilities field will gain from more systematically drawing on conceptual and empirical insights from psychology to complement insights as mostly derived from sociology, geography, innovation studies, anthropology, cultural studies and continental philosophy. Focused on the car as one of the most dominant objects of individual consumption, it examines psychology epistemologies that are different from those that prevail in the mobilities literature. Transport systems shape and are shaped by social and personal identities, fears and anxieties, trauma and phobia; aggression and rebellion; and the search for community and companions. These aspects have been debated in the mobilities literature, but transport psychology investigates the more fundamental motives and conditions underlying the systems, processes and practices that shape transport behaviour. This paper discusses interrelationships and common ground between the mobilities and psychology literatures, and elaborates on the specific contributions made by social, evolutionary and clinical psychology.

  • 26.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    ICT and transport behavior: a conceptual review2018In: International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, ISSN 1556-8318, E-ISSN 1556-8334, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have considerable importance for transport systems, as they provide access to travel information, planning tools, opportunities to share transport modes, to work at-a-distance, compare transport mode cost, make payment, improve safety and health, and to communicate travel patterns. Over the past decade, there has been massive growth in the availability of transportation ICT, in particular, smartphone applications. There is considerable evidence that ICTs have profoundly changed the ways in which transport systems are perceived and used, and mobilities performed, with far-reaching implications for transport mode choices and transport demand. Against this background, the paper seeks to conceptualize ICT with relevance for transport systems, and to discuss the implications for the environmental sustainability of the transport sector. Findings suggest that while some ICT innovations foster and support sustainable transport choices, others raise new and significant barriers to more sustainable transport futures.

  • 27.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Integrating e-scooters in urban transportation: Problems, policies, and the prospect of system change2020In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 79, p. 1-12, article id 102230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the world, cities seek to ease transport-related problems of congestion, air pollution, noise, and traffic injuries. Urban transport planners have welcomed e-scooters as an alternative to motorized individual transport, specifically the car. The public has met e-scooters with both enthusiasm and scepticism, as cities have struggled with unforeseen outcomes such as forms of irresponsible riding, cluttering, or vandalism. This paper investigates the challenges associated with the introduction of e-scooters in ten major cities, based on a content analysis of local media reports. News items (n = 173) were identified through Internet searches and include print media, TV and radio websites. Concerns prior to and after the introduction of e-scooters are assessed, analysed, and interpreted in the context of new policies for this transport mode. Results suggest that many cities have moved through trial and error stages in their search for appropriate legislation. The paper concludes that it is prudent for urban planners to introduce policies regarding maximum speeds, mandatory use of bicycle infrastructure, and dedicated parking, as well as to limit the number of licensed operators. Where negative public opinion can be averted, e-scooters stand a chance to become a disruptive niche innovation with the potential to transform urban transport systems.

  • 28.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden ; Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Low-carbon and post-carbon travel and destinations2015In: The Routledge handbook of tourism and sustainability / [ed] Stefan Gössling, C. Michael Hall & Daniel Scott, London: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 472-480Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as a major threat to the geophysical, biological and socioeconomic stability of the planet, and there is global consensus that a maximum warming of 2°C as compared to pre-industrial temperatures should not be exceeded. As global warming is a result of the concentration of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere, emissions of, in particular, CO2 as well as other greenhouse gases must be reduced. Tourism accounts for 5 per cent of global emissions of CO2 (UNWTO-UNEP-WMO 2008), and an estimated share of 5.2-12.5 per cent of the overall contribution of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases to global warming (calculation for the year 2005; Scott et al. 2010). The sector has consequently some responsibility for contributing to mitigation, specifi cally in the light of its growth, with an anticipated increase of 135 per cent over 2005 emission levels by 2035, mostly as a result of growth in air travel (UNWTO-UNEP-WMO 2008).

  • 29.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Sogndal, Norway.
    National emissions from tourism: An overlooked policy challenge?2013In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 59, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism has been recognized as a significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions sector on a global scale. Yet, only few studies assess tourism's share in national emissions. This paper compares and analyses existing inventories of national emissions from tourism. Studies are difficult to compare, because they use different system boundaries and allocation principles, omitting or including lifecycle emissions and GHG other than CO2. By outlining and analysing these differences, the paper estimates the contribution made by tourism to national emissions, and its greenhouse gas intensity in comparison to other economic sectors. Results indicate that while emissions from tourism are significant in all countries studied, they may, in some countries, exceed 'official' emissions as calculated on the basis of guidelines for national emission inventories under the Kyoto Protocol. This is a result of the fact that bunker fuels are not considered in national GHG inventories, leading to underestimates of the energy- and GHG intensity of tourism economies. While further growth in tourism emissions can be expected in all countries studied, energy-related vulnerabilities are already considerable in many of these. Climate policy for tourism, on the other hand, is largely non-existent, calling for immediate action to consider this sector in national legislation. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 30.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Dept Serv Management & Serv Studies, S-25108 Helsingborg, Sweden.
    New performance indicators for water management in tourism2015In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 46, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is increasingly recognized as a significant water-consuming sector on local, regional and global scales. As a consequence, the efficient use of water resources is now considered a key sustainability challenge for the tourism industry. To date, most research has focused on direct (on site) water consumption, with tourism water management based almost exclusively on direct water use benchmarks. This paper argues that such an approach overlooks the complexity of 'local' and 'global' water use, with local water use affecting sustainable water use in the destination and global water use representing the sustainability of water embodied in goods produced elsewhere, including fuels and food. Focussing on tourism accommodation as the locus of tourism water consumption, conventional water indicators are reviewed and discussed, and knowledge gaps identified. New data accounting for food consumption are then presented for a case study of resort hotels in Rhodes, Greece. The results are used to develop a novel set of performance indicators suitable for resort hotels and other accommodation, considering water availability, planning and operation, as well as complexities of direct vis-a-vis indirect water consumption. The findings suggest a significant potential for water and related cost savings, indicating that holistic water management should be an operational imperative. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Planning sustainable transport2014In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1268-1269Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University;Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Police Perspectives on Road Safety and Transport Politics in Germany2017In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 1771Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Road safety is a key concern of transport governance. In the European Union, a Road Safety Programme was adopted in 2011, with the objective to reduce road deaths in Europe by 50% in the period from 2011 to 2020. Evidence suggests, however, that this goal will not be met. Against this background, this paper investigates police perspectives on traffic laws, traffic behaviour, and transport policy. Police officers working with road safety are in a unique position to evaluate and judge the efficiency of road safety policies, as they record traffic offences, fine, investigate, and witness in court. Geographically, focus is on transport policy in Germany, a country with a dense road network, high levels of car ownership, and a large number of car manufacturers. A total of 14 semi-structured interviews were carried out with police officers in a wide variety of positions within the traffic police in Freiburg. Thematic analysis is used to analyse content and to identify aspects that represent major areas of concern. Officers affirm that traffic laws question traffic safety, for instance with regard to speed and speed limits, or elderly drivers. Specific recommendations for changes in transport policies are made, and results are discussed in the context of their implications for road safety and the European Union's Road Safety Programme.

  • 33.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway;Lund University, Sweden.
    Risks, resilience, and pathways to sustainable aviation: A COVID-19 perspective2020In: Journal of Air Transport Management, ISSN 0969-6997, E-ISSN 1873-2089, Vol. 89, p. 1-4, article id 101933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the COVID-19 pandemic as an opportunity to reconsider the foundations of the global aviation system. There is much evidence that air transport creates opportunities as well as risks. While the former accrue to businesses and individuals, risks are imposed on society. Pandemics, in which aviation has a role as a vector of pathogen distribution, as well as the sector's contribution to climate change are examples of long-standing negative externalities that continue to be ignored in assessments of aviation's economic performance and societal importance. As commercial aviation has shown limited economic resilience throughout its history, this short paper questions whether a return to business-as-usual, supported by very significant State aid payments, is desirable. The volume growth model championed by industry and aviation proponents may have to be replaced with an alternative model of a slimmed air transport system that is economically less vulnerable and accounting for its environmental impacts.

  • 34.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Sustainable transportation in the national parks2015In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1120-1121Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Research Institute, Norway;Lund University, Sweden.
    Technology, ICT and tourism: from big data to the big picture2021In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 849-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past years have seen an unprecedented growth in the ICT economy that has fundamentally altered business models and consumer cultures. Many of the changes this has implied are specifically relevant for tourism, a sector that perhaps more than any other is exposed to and implicated in digital innovation, consumer-business interrelationships, and platform reliance. Most studies of the digitalization of the tourism economy have focused on either business or consumer outcomes; much less attention has been paid to the implications for the Sustainable Development Goals. It is for this reason that this special issue on technology, ICT and tourism focuses on a diverse range of issues related to ICT sustainability: tourism as an opportunity for "digital detox," the role of social networks in foodstagramming, virtual reality tours to explore tourist attractions from home, teaching simulations to improve learning about systems, big data analysis to determine prevalence of environmental interest, as well as regulatory demands on platforms to address principles of accountability, responsibility and transparency. The paper draws the preliminary conclusion that technology & ICTs advance SDGs at best in marginal ways, and that significant efforts are needed to make use of its potential for wider desirable outcomes.

  • 36.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    The psychology of the car: automobile admiration, attachment, and addiction2017 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Psychology of the Car explores automotive cultures through the lens of psychology with the goal of achieving a low-carbon transport future.

    Worldwide there are now more than one billion cars, and their number grows continuously. Yet there is growing evidence that humanity needs to reach ‘peak cars’ as increased air pollution, noise, accidents, and climate change support a decline in car usage. While many governments agree, the car remains attractive, and endeavors to change transport systems have faced fierce resistance. Based on insights from a wide range of transport behaviors, The Psychology of the Carshows the “why” of automotive cultures, providing new perspectives essential for understanding its attractiveness and for defining a more desirable transport future.

    The Psychology of the Car illustrates the growth of global car use over time and its effect on urban transport systems and the global environment. It looks at the adoption of the car into lifestyles, the “mobilities turn,” and how the car impacts collective and personal identities. The book examines car drivers themselves; their personalities, preferences, and personality disorders relevant to driving. The book looks at the role power, control, dominance, speed, and gender play, as well as the interrelationship between personal freedom and law enforcement. The book explores risk-taking behaviors as accidental death is a central element of car driving. The book addresses how interventions can be successful as well as which interventions are unlikely to work, and concludes with how a more sustainable transport future can be created based on emerging transport trends.

    • Features deep analyses of individual and collective psychologies of car affection, moving beyond sociology-based interpretations of automobile culture
    • Illustrates concepts using popular culture examples that expose ideas about automobility
    • Shows how fewer, smaller and more environmentally friendly cars, as well as low-carbon transport modes, are more socially attractive
  • 37.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Lund University.
    Tourism and development in tropical islands: political ecology perspectives2003Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    'This is a welcome addition to the literature on island tourism. It is the first sustained cross-national attempt to apply the political ecology perspective across a global sample of inter-tropical coastal settings. This conceptual framework focuses on the interaction between various tourism stakeholders - national and international, public and private - to explain the process of environmental change in island resort areas. the volume contains an unusual diversity of case studies, rich and informative in their own right. It will provide valuable reading for both tourism academics and professionals and spawn further research along the same lines.' - Jerome L. McElroy, Saint Mary's College, Indiana, US

    'This book provides fascinating and readable accounts of the interplay between tourism development, politics and local environments from the new perspective of political ecology. Thus, it adds institutional depth to studies of tourism development and deserves to be read widely.' - Clem Tisdell, the University of Queensland, Australia

    Tropical islands are fragile, vulnerable environments and yet they are coming under increasing strain due to coastal developments and global environmental change. As a result of their remote location, small size and limited natural resource endowments, tourism has become an important economic activity, leading to emerging conflicts between the interests of developers, tourists and residents.

  • 38.
    Gössling, Stefan
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development. Macroeconomic Models and Empirical Methods (Brau, R., Lanza, A. and Usai, S. [eds] 2008)2009In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 206-207Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University ; Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Tourism, information technologies and sustainability: an exploratory review2017In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 1024-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable attention has been paid in recent years to the fundamental changes in the global tourism system related to the emergence of information technologies (IT), and, specifically, the rise of social media. Opportunities to search travel-related information, to reserve and book, evaluate and judge; to receive travel advice and to communicate one's mobility patterns have all profoundly changed the practices of performing tourism, with concomitant repercussions for the management and marketing of businesses and destinations. This paper provides a discussion of the implications of these changes for the sustainability of the global tourism system. Based on an exploratory research design, key changes in the tourism system are identified and discussed with regard to their environmental, socio-cultural and psychological, as well as economic significance. The paper concludes that IT affects the tourism system in numerous and complex ways, with mixed outcomes for sustainability: while most changes would currently appear to be ambivalent – and some outright negative – there is considerable potential for IT to support more sustainable tourism. Yet, this would require considerable changes in the tourism system on global, national and individual business' levels, and require tourism academics to probe many new issues.

  • 40.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Research Institute, Norway;Lund University, Sweden.
    Tourism, technology and ICT: a critical review of affordances and concessions2021In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 733-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital information age has changed global tourism in profound ways. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are pervasive, and they have become inextricably linked with contemporary consumer cultures. ICTs represent affordances: to apprise, plan, order, network, socialize, stream, transact and rate. These are remunerated with concessions in the form of consumer data that is used to determine product/service marketability, and to predict and manipulate consumer choices. As a result, ICTs have profoundly changed society, with repercussions for identity formation, social norms, and business structures. Tourism is at the forefront of these developments: as a driver of ICT introductions, an arena for testing & trialing, and a global market. This paper critically examines these developments and its linkages to tourism and sustainability goals, concluding that existing academic assessments are optimistic, simplistic and monocausal, with a focus on business and marketing opportunities. Tourism appears to have developed through four stages of ICT adoption - opportunity, disruption, immersion and usurpation -, which reflect on new opportunities and risks, and the need for more critical evaluations of the implications of the ICT economy.

  • 41.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Tourism, tourist learning and sustainability: an exploratory discussion of complexities, problems and opportunities2018In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 292-306Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning is often a central element of tourism. Tourists can learn actively, i.e. with a specific purpose, as well as passively through the comparison of values, norms and customs. It has been argued that travel supports active learning that has positive outcomes for sustainability, for instance, in the context of conservation. Yet, the complexity of active and passive learning processes and their outcomes for environmental sustainability and sustainable lifestyles remain insufficiently understood. Against this background, the paper discusses selected learning outcomes for transportation (air travel), accommodation (hotels) and activities (theme park visits). Findings suggest that desirable learning (defined as pro-sustainable development learning) in tourism may be very limited, while in particular, passive learning processes which redefine social norms frequently have outcomes that are largely detrimental to sustainable lifestyles. They include forms of moral licensing, the diffusion of responsibilities as well as the attenuation of the negative consequences of travel. Given the economic, social and cultural importance of tourism vis-a-vis its global implications for environmental sustainability, learning outcomes in tourism deserve to be studied in greater detail, while strategies need to be devised to enhance sustainable learning effects.

  • 42.
    Gössling, Stefan
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Trends in Tourism in the Western Indian Ocean2009In: Coastal Tourism Development: Planning and Management Issues / [ed] Dowling, R. and Pforr, C., Channel View Publications , 2009, p. 53-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University.
    Urban transport justice2016In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 54, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities in the world seek to establish more sustainable urban transport systems with a view to reduce accidents, congestion, air and noise pollution, and to improve social interactions, liveability and amenity values. Against this background, this paper frames urban transportation as an issue of justice: contemporary transport systems are characterized by injustice, as they tend to favour and prioritize motorized transport, accepting that considerable environmental and social burdens are put on more sustainable forms of transportation, other traffic participants and society as a whole. To conceptualize 'urban transport justice', the paper discusses three dimensions where injustices are apparent: Exposure to traffic risks and pollutants; distribution of space; and valuation of transport time. It is argued that public and political recognition of urban transport injustices provides significant argument for changes in urban planning, transport infrastructure development and traffic management. © 2016 Elsevier B.V..

  • 44.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Urban transport transitions: Copenhagen, City of Cyclists2013In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 33, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility growth poses considerable challenges to city planners around the world, as it entails problems of congestion, air pollution, and accidents. Many cities have thus sought to increase the share of sustainable transport, and specifically travel by bicycle. However, it appears that measures to foster cycling are often implemented on an ad hoc basis, lacking strategic focus and a more profound understanding of bicycle cultures. New insights can be gained from Copenhagen, Denmark, a selfdeclared City of Cyclists that has made considerable progress towards increasing the share of travel by bicycle, with the political goal to become the "world's best city for bicycling". In this article, the success, reproducibility and limitations of the Copenhagen bicycle strategy are discussed in an urban transport transitions framework, based on a content- and discourse analysis of the city's official documents to assess the respective role of market-based, command-and-control, and soft policy measures in encouraging bicycling. Results suggest that soft policies, integrated with command-and-control measures, and the consideration of bicyclist expectations and concerns with regard to perceptions of safety, speed and comfort have been key in achieving high bicycle trip shares. Integrating these in comprehensive planning frameworks appears to be an approach that is more likely to foster bicycle cultures that can result in urban transport transitions. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Abegg, Bruno
    University of Innsbruck, Austria ; AlpS GmbH, Austria.
    Steiger, Robert
    University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    “It was raining all the time!”: Ex post tourist weather perceptions2016In: Atmosphere, ISSN 2073-4433, E-ISSN 2073-4433, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of weather for tourism is now widely recognized. However, no research has so far addressed weather events from retrospective viewpoints, and, in particular, the role of “extreme” events in longer-term holiday memories. To better understand the character of ex post weather experiences and their importance in destination image perceptions and future travel planning behavior, this exploratory study addressed a sample of 50 tourists from three globally important source markets: Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Results indicate that weather events do not dominate long-term memories of tourist experiences. Yet, weather events are important in shaping destination image, with “rain” being the single most important weather variable negatively influencing perceptions. Results also suggest that weather events perceived as extreme can involve considerable emotions. The study of ex post traveler memories consequently makes a valuable contribution to the understanding of the complexity of “extreme weather” events for tourist demand responses.

  • 46.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Aeberhard, Marc
    Luxury Hotel & Spa Management Ltd. Zürich, Switzerland.
    Meurer, Jörg
    KEYLENS Management Consultants, Germany.
    Krause, Mario
    Deutsches Zentrum für Individualisierte Prävention und Leistungsverbesserung, Germany.
    Luxusrelevanz ausgewählter Megatrends im Tourismus2019In: Grundlagen und neue Perspektiven des Luxustourismus: Kundenverhalten - Paradigmenwechsel - Markttrends - Best-Practice-Beispiele / [ed] Roland Conrady;David Ruetz;Marc Aeberhard, Springer, 2019, p. 223-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Über die vielfältigen Gesichter von Luxus widmet sich der Autor insbesondere dem Thema Gesundheit als Wert und Luxusgut.

    Es werden die Unterschiede einer auf Krankheit gerichteten Medizin gegenüber Angeboten zur Verbesserung von Gesundheit vor dem Hintergrund des Fortschritts im Bereich der Personalisierten Medizin gegenübergestellt. Diese Innovationen lassen den Traum von ewiger Jugend und Unsterblichkeit in einem neuen Licht erscheinen. Mit diesem Paradigmenwechsel und den Forschungsergebnissen über Hundertjährige wird die Frage nach den Inhalten und der Sinnhaftigkeit von Gesundheitsangeboten gestellt.

    Der Autor entwirft Szenarien, wie Gesundheitsangebote gerade auch im Bereich des Torurismus dem Wunsch des Einzelnen nach Lebenssinn, Wertschätzung, Verbundenheit und Simplizität Rechnung tragen können. Er zeigt auf, welche Vorteile in der Erfahrbarkeit von Gesundheit durch neue Angebote des Reisens entstehen.

    Gesundheit wird als magischer Moment emotional erfahrbar. Gesundheit erfährt hiermit eine neue Positionierung als Luxusgut.

  • 47.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing and Tourism Studies (MTS). Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Balas, Martin
    Univ Sustainable Dev Eberswalde, Germany.
    Mayer, Marius
    Munich Univ Appl Sci, Germany;Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Sun, Ya-Yen
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    A review of tourism and climate change mitigation: The scales, scopes, stakeholders and strategies of carbon management2023In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 95, article id 104681Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism needs to reduce emissions in line with other economic sectors, if the international community's objective of staying global warming at 1.5 degrees-2.0 degrees C is to be achieved. This will require the industry to half emissions to 2030, and to reach net-zero by mid-century. Mitigation requires consideration of four dimensions, the Scales, Scopes, Stakeholders and Strategies of carbon management. The paper provides a systematic review of these dimensions and their interrelationships, with a focus on emission inventory comprehensiveness; allocation principles at different scales; clearly defined responsibilities for decarbonization; and the identification of significant mitigation strategies. The paper concludes that without mitigation efforts, tourism will deplete 40% of the world's remaining carbon budget to 1.5 degrees C. Yet, the most powerful decarbonization measures face major corporate, political and technical barriers. Without worldwide policy efforts at the national scale to manage the sector's emissions, tourism will turn into one of the major drivers of climate change.

  • 48.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Department of Service Management, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Buckley, Ralf
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Carbon labels in tourism: persuasive communication?2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 111, no Part B, p. 358-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecolabels are widespread tools for policy and marketing in many industry sectors. Carbon labels focussing on carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions are one specialised category of ecolabel in use by tourism corporations. All ecolabels, including carbon labels, rely on persuasive communication: i.e., providing technical information to individuals in ways that induce them to change relevant behaviours. This requires that individuals understand that information, appreciate its significance, trust its reliability, and know how to act more sustainably. Here, these four criteria are applied to a set of tourism carbon label schemes, to assess whether the information provided by existing labels is comprehensive. Secondly, results are presented from a survey of environmentally aware tourists and their perspectives of two different types of carbon labels. Results indicate that tourism carbon label schemes suffer significant shortcomings both from the theoretical perspective of communications analysis and from the practical perspective of tourist understanding and action. Results indicate that even if tourists care about their climate change impacts, carbon labels are currently ineffective because of deficiencies in communications. Since such deficiencies can be overcome, there are opportunities for carbon labels to become more widely and successfully used.

  • 49.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Ceron, J.-P
    Dubois, G
    Hall, C. M.
    Hypermobile travellers2009In: Climate Change and Aviation: issues, challenges and solutions / [ed] Gössling, S. and Upham, P, London ; Sterling, VA: Earthscan , 2009, p. 131-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University, Sweden;Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Choi, Andy
    Natl Inst Ecol, Republic of Korea.
    Dekker, Kaely
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Metzler, Daniel
    Munich Univ Appl Sci, Germany.
    The Social Cost of Automobility, Cycling and Walking in the European Union2019In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 158, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost-benefit-analyses (CBA) are widely used to assess transport projects. Comparing various CBA frameworks, this paper concludes that the range of parameters considered in EU transport CBA is limited. A comprehensive list of criteria is presented, and unit costs identified. These are used to calculate the external and private cost of automobility, cycling and walking in the European Union. Results suggest that each kilometer driven by car incurs an external cost of (sic)0.11, while cycling and walking represent benefits of (sic)0.18 and (sic)0.37 per kilometer. Extrapolated to the total number of passenger kilometers driven, cycled or walked in the European Union, the cost of automobility is about (sic)500 billion per year. Due to positive health effects, cycling is an external benefit worth (sic)24 billion per year and walking (sic)66 billion per year. CBA frameworks in the EU should be widened to better include the full range of externalities, and, where feasible, be used comparatively to better understand the consequences of different transport investment decisions.

1234 1 - 50 of 184
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf