lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ali, Muatasem Latif
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Riskkommunikation generellt exemplifierat genom branden i Halmstad 20122017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A chemical accident can cause damage in individuals, groups or entire communities. The injury may concern human life, property or the environment. An accident can affect a large part of society and requires cooperation between the actors involved. Different stakeholders need to be informed, but it is not certain how a message should be delivered and who should do it.

    The study's purpose is to study risk communication generally, as exemplified by the accident in Halmstad September 21, 2012, when a fire broke out in a warehouse in Halmstad harbor. How the involved persons experienced communication,

    What factors could affect the communication at such types of critical situations.

    In the study, two methods have been used. The first used method was a web-survey of people working in civil protection in Halmstad municipality, environmental office in Halmstad, the public living in the municipality, police, Coast Guard, industries and media. The second method was semi-structured interviews addressed to some of those affected who worked in media, police, coast guard, the company, emergency services and the local authority.

    This study showed that there were differences between the respondents' answers on how respondents perceived that there were risks to human health or the environment in this accident. Many of the respondents who responded to the survey felt that the risk communication worked well after the fire. This survey and semi- structured interviews showed that respondents felt that the municipality's website was a good information channel and the internet and social media could be a good source for the responsible authorities to quickly disseminate information to the public. This study showed that the municipality and emergency services were actors most concerned in this context when it came to communicating risks in major accidents where chemicals were involved and all respondents had great confidence to the emergency services and municipality. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Usage of Biofuels in Sweden2013In: CSR-2 Catalyst for renewable sources: Fuel, Energy, Chemicals Book of Abstracts / [ed] Vadim Yakovlev, Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibrisk, Russia: Boreskov Institute of Catalysis , 2013, p. 5-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, biofuels have come into substantial use, in an extent that are claimed to be bigger than use of fossil oil. One driving force for this have been the CO2-tax that was introduced in 1991 (1). According to SVEBIO:s calculations (2) based on the Swedish Energy Agency´s prognosis, the total energy consumption in Sweden 2012 was 404 TWh. If the figure is broken down on the different energy sources (figure 1) one can see that the consumption roughly distribute in three different, equally sized, blocks, Biofuels, fossil fuels and water & nuclear power. The major use of the fossil fuels is for transport and the water & nuclear power is used as electric power. The main use of the biofuels is for heating in the industrial sector and as district heating. In 2009 the consumption from those two segments was 85 TWh, and 10 TWh of bio power was co-produced giving an average biomass to electricity efficiency of 12%. This indicates a substantial conversion potential from hot water production to combined heat and power (CHP) production. in Sweden 2013 broken down on the different energy sources. In 2006 the pulp, paper and sawmill industry accounted for 95% of the bio energy consumption in the industrial sector, and the major biofuel consumed was black liquor (5). However, the pulp and paper industries also produced the black liquor in their own processes. The major energy source (58%) for district heating during 2006 was woody biomass (chips, pellets etc.) followed by waste (24%), peat (6%) and others (12%) (5). The use of peat has probably decreased since 2006 since peat is no longer regarded as a renewable energy source. While the use of biofuel for heating purpose is well developed and the bio-power is expected to grow, the use in the transport sector is small, 9 TWh or 7% in 2011. The main consumption there is due to the mandatory addition (5%) of ethanol to gasoline and FAME to diesel (6). The Swedish authorities have announced plans to increase the renewable content to 7.5 % in 2015 on the way to fulfill the EU’s goal of 10 % renewable transportation fuels in 2020. However the new proposed fuel directive in EU says that a maximum of 5% renewable fuel may be produced from food sources like sugars and vegetable oils. Another bothersome fact is that, in principle, all rape seed oil produced in Sweden is consumed (95-97%) in the food sector, and consequently all FAME used (in principle) in Sweden is imported as FAME, rape seed oil or seed (6). In Sweden a new source of biodiesel have emerged, tall oil diesel. Tall oil is extracted from black liquor and refined into a diesel fraction (not FAME) and can be mixed into fossil diesel, i.e. Preem Evolution diesel. The SUNPINE plant in Piteå have a capacity of 100 000 metric tons of tall oil diesel per annum, while the total potential in all of Sweden is claimed to be 200 000 tons (7). 100 000 tons of tall oil corresponds to 1% of the total diesel consumption in Sweden. in Sweden for 2010 and a prognosis for 2014. (6). Accordingly, the profoundest task is to decrease the fossil fuel dependency in the transport sector, and clearly, the first generation biofuels can´t do this on its own. Biogas is a fuel gas with high methane content that can be used in a similar way to natural gas; for instance for cooking, heating and as transportation fuel. Today biogas is produced by fermentation of waste (municipal waste, sludge, manure), but can be produced by gasification of biomass, for instance from forest residues such as branches and rots (GROT in Swedish). To get high efficiency in the production, the lower hydrocarbons, mainly methane, in the producer gas, should not be converted into synthesis gas. Instead a synthesis gas with high methane content is sought. This limits the drainage of chemically bonded energy, due to the exothermic reaction in the synthesis step (so called methanisation). In 2011 0.7 TWh of biogas was produced in Sweden by fermentation of waste (6) and there were no production by gasification, at least not of economic importance. The potential seems to be large, though. In 2008 the total potential for biogas production, in Sweden, from waste by fermentation and gasification was estimated to 70 TWh (10 TWh fermentation and 60 TWh gasification) (8). This figure includes only different types of waste and no dedicated agricultural crops or dedicated forest harvest. Activities in the biogas sector, by gasification, in Sweden are the Göteborgs energi´s Gobigas project in Gothenburg and Eon´s Bio2G-project, now pending, in south of Sweden. If the producer gas is cleaned and upgraded into synthesis gas also other fuels could be produced. In Sweden methanol and DME productions are planned for in the Värmlands metanol-project and at Chemrecs DME production plant in Piteå.

    Download (pdf)
    extended abstract
  • 3.
    Brandin, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola .
    Leveau, Andreas
    Biofuel-Solutions AB.
    Selective Catalysts for Glycerol Dehydration2013In: CRS-2, Catalysis for Renewable Sources: Fuel,Energy,ChemicalsBook of Abstracts / [ed] Vadim Yakovlev, Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk, Russia: Boreskov Institute of Catalysis , 2013, p. 17-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     There has been an increased interest over the last decade for replacing fossil based feedstock’s with renewable ones. There are several such feedstock’s that are currently being investigated such as cellulose, lignin, hemicellulose, triglycerides etc. However, when trying to perform selective reactions an as homogeneous feedstock as possible is preferable. One such feedstock example is glycerol, a side-product from biofuels production, which is a tri-alcohol and thus has much flexibility for reactions, e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, addition reactions etc. Glycerol in itself is a good starting point for fine chemicals production being non-toxic and available in rather large quantities [1-2]. A key reaction for glycerol valorisation is the dehydration of glycerol to form acrolein, an unsaturated C3 aldehyde, which may be used for producing acrylic acid, acrylonitrile and other important chemcial products. It has recently been shown that pore-condensation of glycerol is an issue under industrial like conditions, leading to liquid-phase reactions and speeding up the catalyst activity and selectivity loss [3]. To address this issue, modified catalyst materials have been prepared where the relevant micro and meso pores have been removed by thermal sintering; calculations have shown that pores below 45 Å may be subject to pore condensation. The catalyst starting material was a 10% WO3 by weight supported on ZrO2 in the form of beads 1–2 mm and it was thermally treated at 400°C, 500°C, 600°C, 700°C, 700°C, 800°C, 850°C, 900°C and 1000°C for 2 hours. The catalysts were characterised using nitrogen adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), Raman spectroscopy and ammonia temperature programmed desorption. The thermal sintered catalysts show first of all a decreasing BET surface area with sintering commencing between 700°C and 800°C when it decreases from the initial 71 m2/g to 62 m2/g and at 1000°C there is a mere 5 m2/g of surface area left. During sintering, the micro and meso-porosity is reduced as evidenced by MIP and depicted in figure 1. As may be seen in the figure, sintering decrease the amount of pores below and around 100 Å is reduced at a sintering temperature of 800°C and above. The most suitable catalyst based on the MIP appears to be the one sintered at 850°C which is further strengthened by the Raman analysis. There is a clear shift in the tungsten structure from monoclinic to triclinic between 850°C and 900°C and it is believed that the monoclinic phase is important for activity and selectivity. Further, the heat treatment shows that there is an increase in catalyst acidity measured as mmol NH3/(m2/g) but a decrease in the acid strength as evidenced by a decrease in the desorption peak maximum temperature.

     

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Brandin, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Odenbrand, Ingemar
    Lund University .
    Poisoning of SCR Catalysts used in Municipal Waste Incineration Applications2017In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, E-ISSN 1572-9028, Vol. 60, no 17-18, p. 1306-1316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A commercial vanadia, tungsta on titania SCRcatalyst was poisoned in a side stream in a waste incinerationplant. The effect of especially alkali metal poisoningwas observed resulting in a decreased activity at long timesof exposure. The deactivation after 2311 h was 36% whilethe decrease in surface area was only 7.6%. Thus the majorcause for deactivation was a chemical blocking of acidicsites by alkali metals. The activation–deactivation modelshowed excellent agreement with experimental data. Themodel suggests that the original adsorption sites, fromthe preparation of the catalyst, are rapidly deactivated butare replaced by a new population of adsorption sites dueto activation of the catalyst surface by sulphur compounds(SO2, SO3)in the flue gas.

  • 5.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Sivaramakrishnan, K.Yale University.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livlihoods, and Identities in South Asia2006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sivaramakrishnan, K.
    Yale university, USA.
    Introduction: Ecological Nationalisms: Claiming Nature for Making History2005In: Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods and Identities in South Asia / [ed] Cederlöf, G & Sivaramakrishnan, K, New Delhi: Permanent Black , 2005, p. 1-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Chiotis, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Farmers, Intermediaries and ICTs in an Agricultural Community in Greece- an ethnographic study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to assess the implications of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) on the agricultural supply chain in Greece by examining the relationships between farmers and their intermediaries, and their interactions during the buying and selling process. More specifically, the focus of the research takes place in Pouri, a small village in central Greece whose economy centers around Apple Farming, where we can observe the exchange of locally grown goods between farmers and intermediaries. The thesis consists of two parts; the first part examines how Greek farmers perceive the process of buying and selling agricultural products and how they respond to problems within their current structure; through observing processes, conducting interviews and collecting narrative stories to identify the issues, we assess whether it would be advantageous for farmers to implement ICTs as part of the solution. The second part consists of a review of the academic literature to examine the same or similar situations in the agricultural supply chain of other global regions and their economic contexts. Lastly, a thorough thematic analysis of the research data provides a better understanding of the issues facing farmers and their needs as they pertain to ICTs, to improve the agricultural supply chain and the entire rural sector.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Farmers, Intermediaries and ICTs in an Agricultural Community in Greece- an ethnographic study
  • 8.
    Eihe, Paula
    et al.
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia.
    Vebere, Lasma Lucija
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia.
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia;Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia.
    Pilecka, Jovita
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia;Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia.
    Sachpazidou, Varvara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Grinberga, Linda
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia.
    The effect of acidification of pig slurry digestate applied on winter rapeseed on the ammonia emission reduction2019In: XVI-th International youth Science and Environmental Baltic Region Countries Forum 7–9 October 2019, Gdansk, Poland, Institute of Physics (IOP), 2019, Vol. 390, no 1, p. 1-6, article id 012043Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Agriculture is the main source of ammonia emissions. It generates around 75% of global emissions of ammonia to the atmosphere and soil fertilisation accounts for half of agricultural emissions. Ammonia emissions have a negative impact on ecosystems and human health, as it is able to accumulate both as solid particles and as an integral part of acid cases. Measures to reduce ammonia emissions can be divided into three large groups: the first group is ammonia-reducing measures in animal housing, the second group is ammonia-reducing measures during manure storage, and the third group is ammonia-reducing measures during the application of manure. Measurements of ammonia emissions were carried out in the parish of Jaunberze, which took place on 30 April and 1 May 2018. Sulphuric acid was used for acidification of pig slurry digestate. Picarro G2508 was used for on field measurement of ammonia concentrations with 1 second interval, a measurement time of one session was 400 seconds. The volume of the chamber was 60 l and was connected to the Picarro G2508 using a 10 m long Teflon tube. The measurement of ammonia emissions was with three repetitions for each measurement, with a reference error of less than 5%. Emissions were measured at different time intervals: immediately after digestate distribution, 2 hours, 4 hours and the 24 hours after digestate application. The emission of ammonia from digestate without vegetation after 24 hours was 13 kg ha-1, for acidified digestate without vegetation 8.5 kg ha -1, while the acidified digestate with vegetation within 24 hours reached 2.5 kg of ha -1 ammonia emissions, five times lower than that of non-vegetation.

  • 9.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Carbon Management in Tourism: Mitigating the Impacts on Climate Change2011Book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    High, Christopher
    University of Warwick, UK.
    The value of plants in a Lowveld agricultural system: A case study of Dingleydale B, Bushbuckridge1996Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
  • 11.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    et al.
    Biofuel-Solution i Malmö AB (Lund University/Chemical engineering).
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering. Biofuel-Solution i Malmö AB.
    A Process for Producing Acrolein2012Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Disclosed is a process for dehydrating glycerol into acrolein over an acidic catalyst in gas phase in the presence of hydrogen, minimizing side reactions forming carbon deposits on the catalyst.

  • 12.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    et al.
    Biofuel-Solution i Malmö AB ( Lund University/ Chemical Engineering) .
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering. Biofuel-Solution i Malmö AB.
    Method for Hydrogenating 1,2-Unsaturated Carbonylic Compounds2011Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Disclosed is a method of hydrogenating an1,2-unsaturated carbonylic compound to obtain the corresponding saturated carbonylic compound in the presence of a palladium catalyst with heterogeneous distribution of palladium

  • 13.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    et al.
    Biofuel-solution I Malmö AB (Lund University/ Chemical Engineering).
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering. Biofuel-Solution i Malmö AB.
    Process for Preparing Lower Hydrocarbons from Glycerol2011Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to a process of preparing hydrocarbons from oxygenated hydrocarbons by use of at least two catalysts.

  • 14.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    et al.
    Biofuel-solution i Malmö AB (Lund University/Chemical Engineering).
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering. Biofuel-solution i Malmö AB.
    Woods, Richard Root
    Primafuel Inc. (US).
    Porter, Brook
    Primafuel inc. (US).
    Gas Phase Process for Monoalcohol Production from Glycerol2008Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A method of producing short chain alcohols from glycerol generated as a byproduct of biodiesel production is provided.

  • 15.
    Härlin, Mikael
    University of Gothenburg.
    Tree-thinking and nemertean systematics, with a systematization of the Eureptantia1998In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 365, no 1, p. 33-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I review how some influential nemertean systematistshave perceived and illustrated phylogenetic trees andargue that the nineteenth century nemerteantaxonomists still influence many contemporarynemertean taxonomists to a high degree. By showing hownineteenth century systematics differs from moremodern views on trees, I hope to convey the advantagesof a cladistic approach to tree-thinking and nemerteansystematics. Furthermore I propose a systematizationof the Eureptantia that illustrates the cladisticapproach to tree-thinking but, more importantly, isalso a better representation of eureptantic phylogenythan previous classifications.

  • 16.
    Ohlsson, Jens
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Uppföljning av miljöhänsyn vid föryngringsavverkningar utförda av Stora Enso i Värmland2011Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 17.
    Parsland, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Nickel-substituted Ba-hexaaluminates as catalysts stem-reforming of tars2013In: CRS-2, Catalysis for Renewable sources: Fuel. Energy, Chemicals Book of Abstracts / [ed] Vadim Yakovlev, Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk: Boreskov Institute of Catalysis , 2013, p. 62-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gasification of woody biomass converts the solid organic material into a gaseous product with a higher energy value and by this mean provide a more carbon neutral gaseous fuel than the common fossil ones. The produced raw gas mainly contains H2, CO, CO2, CH4, H2O and N2 together with organic (tars) and inorganic (alkali) components and fine particulates. The amount of impurities in the raw gas is dependent of the fuel properties and the gasification process technology and the quality of the resulting product gas determines its suitability for more advanced purposes. One of the major general concerns within the gasification processes is the formation of tars. Tars are a vast group of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and there are a number of definitions. On an EU/IEA/US-DOE discussion meeting in Brussels 1998, a number of experts agreed on a simplified classification of tars as “all organic contaminants with a molecular weight larger than benzene” [1]. The aim of this work is to investigate the steam reforming ability of a catalytic material not previously tested in this type of application in order to achieve an energy-efficient and high-quality gasification gas. The physical demands for an optimal tar-cracking and steam reforming catalyst is a high surface area, thermal stability, mechanical strength and a capacity to withstand high gas velocities, poisons such as H2S or NH3 and other impurities. Additionally it has to resist the process steam, as steam is well known to enhance sintering of porous materials. Nickel is a familiar catalyst for steam reforming. Hexaaluminate is a well-known catalyst support with properties that may answer to the requests of a non-abrasive, high-temperaturestable and steam-resistant catalytic material. It is a structural oxide where the general formula for the doped unit cell is MIMII(x)Al12-xO19-d where MI represents the mirror plane cation and MII is the aluminum site in the lattice where substitution may occur. MII is often a transition metal ion of the same size and charge as aluminum. MI is an ion located in the mirror plane of the structure and it is a large metal ion, often from the alkaline, alkaline earth or rare earth metal group. The stability and activity of these materials are often being related to the properties of MI and MII. The activity is highly dependent on the nature of the Al-substituted metal and partially by the nature of MII [2]. In our experiments we have tested the catalytic capacity of Ni-substituted Ba-hexaaluminates synthesised by the sol-gel method [3], both in a model set-up and in a gasification plant. In the lab-scale set-up different catalyst-formulae was tested under various temperatures for reforming of methyl-naphthalene. The results show a good catalytic activity for tar-breakdown. As expected the substitution level of Ni is clearly coupled to the reaction temperature. With the most highly substituted Ni-Bahexaaluminate at 900 °C all of the methyl-naphthalene has been broken downtogether with all of the resulting hydrocarbons. The Ni-Bahexaaluminate catalyst has recently also been tested in real process-gas.

    These results are still to be evaluated, but indicate a positive result.

     

     

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Pemunta, Ngambouk Vitalis
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Challenges of Conservation and Large-scale Agricultural Development in an Era of Neoliberal Environmental Governance in Cameroon2016In: Privatization: Policies, Developments and Challenges / [ed] Amelia Hansen, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of Western imposed neoliberal development policies by most African countries have been accompanied by unfettered effects. Through these policies, Western-based development institutions (World Bank and the International Monetary Fund) have subsequently come to have a lot of leverage on development policies and practices in the donor dependent countries of the Less Developed world including Cameroon. In Cameroon, one area of neoliberal governmentality in involves the management of the environment which is at crossroads with the establishment of largescale agricultural plantations by Western multinationals in the country. This paper explores how the American-based agro-industrial company Herakles Farm has thoroughly disregarded state and international laws and codes of conduct in the setting up of its contentious oil palm plantation that is largely located in between protected areas in the ever-green forest of Southwest Cameroon. Through its creation of uninhabited spaces via protected areas in the region, as well as by the ceding of land around these same protected areas for large-scale agricultural development, the state of Cameroon is involved in the reordering of man-nature relationship. The state´s action bespeaks of the chasm between conservation and large-scale agricultural development in an era of neoliberal environmental governance. The paper argues that the Herakle concession is a means by which the state is territorializing and controlling this unruly frontier space. It is also representative of a long trajectory of the marginalization of this space that has been discursively produced over and over and that allows for dispossession and accumulation in the name of development. The state´s creation of developmentalizable and governable spaces has wrought violence on local livelihoods in a region that has been consistently produced as a frontier space by both colonial and postcolonial powers. 

  • 19.
    Porshnov, Dmitry
    et al.
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. University of Latvia, Latvia;Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    University of Latvia, Latvia;Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Pilecka, Jovita
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia.
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Geoparks in cultural and landscape preservation context2019In: 25th Annual International Scientific Conference "Research for Rural Development 2019" 15 - 17 May, 2019, Jelgava: Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies , 2019, Vol. 1, p. 154-159Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Society aims to develop frames for recognizing important geological and geomorphological sites and features or landscapes within their national and even transnational boundaries. Earth heritage sites educate the general public and preserve cultural and environmental matters. New trends of sustainable development, importance of site conservation are demanding that landforms and landscapes, rocks, minerals, fossils, soils should be protected legally, as they give understanding about the evolution of Mother Earth in local and regional context to generations. The Geopark concept was developed in cooperation with UNESCO and followed a large number of requests to UNESCO from all over the world, from geological institutions and geoscientists and non-governmental organizations, and it became extremely popular and influential to preserve those geological heritage areas, nowadays still recognized only nationally or not at all. This paper aims to give comprehensive overview of existing geoparks in the Baltic Sea Region, as well as analyze aspiring geoparks and unpublished initiatives of potential geopark (Livonia and Vooremaa) eventual establishment in frames of cultural and landscape preservation context. Criteria, requirements and earlier studies are given in context. The geoparks should mainly contain cultural and educational purpose while targeting the least possible damage in preservational aspect

  • 20.
    Sattler, Cornelia
    et al.
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Germany.
    Schrader, Julian
    Univ Göttingen, Germany.
    Farkas, Viktor Matyas
    Christian A Ibrechts Univ, Germany.
    Settele, Josef
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Germany;German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res Halle Jena, Germany.
    Franzén, Markus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Germany.
    Pesticide diversity in rice growing areas of Northern Vietnam2018In: Paddy and Water Environment, ISSN 1611-2490, E-ISSN 1611-2504, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 339-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pesticide use in developing countries increases rapidly. In many regions, we miss knowledge of how frequently pesticides are applied and which active ingredients are used. We present a new cost-efficient and rapid assessment method of recording pesticides diversity in rice-dominated landscapes and present some evidence of the misuse of active ingredients in our study regions. We investigated 17 rice fields in two regions of Northern Vietnam in 2014 and 2015. At each region, we explore the abundance of pesticides used with three methods including (1) the novel approach of collecting pesticide packages close to our target rice fields, (2) observations of farmers spraying pesticides in the surrounding and (3) interviewing local farmers. By collecting pesticide packages, we found 811 packages containing 74 different active ingredients. On average, 19 active ingredients (ranging from four to 40 active ingredients) were applied with an average content of 275.3 g of active ingredients per site. Insecticide packages (39%) were most abundant followed by those of fungicides (31%), herbicides (16%) and other active ingredients (14%). On all sites, active ingredients banned in the European Union were applied by the farmers. Collecting pesticide packages proved to be an efficient and rapidly implemented method to obtain some baseline information about pesticide application (for Northern Vietnam). We suspect that improved agricultural extension services could contribute to good agricultural practices in pest management. Generally, better information and education for local farmers for appropriate use of pesticides seem a necessity.

  • 21.
    Sundberg, Per
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Turbeville, J. M.
    University of Michigan, USA.
    Härlin, Mikael
    University of Arkansas, USA.
    There is no support for Jensen's hypothesis of nemerteans as ancestors to the vertebrates1998In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 365, no 1, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nemerteans (phylum Nemertea) have been viewed by mostzoologists as descended from, or closely related to,the flatworms. This view is based mainly on theirsupposedly acoelomate body. Their ancestry, however,is a point of controversy and there is evidence for acoelomate, protostomous origin. Notwithstanding thesedifferent views, most zoologists consider nemerteansto be phylogenetically distant from the chordates.Four authors (Hubrecht, Macfarlane, Jensen, Willmer),however, have postulated that nemerteans instead areclosely related to the chordates and that they sharea most recent common ancestor with the vertebrates. We argue that this view is based on a flawed view ofhomology and of seeing evolution as a series ofprogressions, which has no support in modernevolutionary thinking. Since there are nomorphological synapomorphies supporting aChordata-Nemertea clade, these authors instead guesswhat characteristics in extant nemerteans gave rise tocharacters observed in recent chordates. For example,they propose that the nemertean proboscis sheath hasevolved into the notochord. This is mere speculation,lacking testable propositions and is hence void ofinformation, and thus becomes futile in our view. However, the idea of a nemertean-vertebrate sisterrelationship as such is a testable hypotheses, and wetest it by applying the parsimony criterion to a setof morphological characters, and a set of molecular(the 18S rRNA gene) characters. Both tests reject thehypothesis.

  • 22.
    Svensson, Helena
    et al.
    Chemical Engineering, Lund University.
    Tunå, Per
    Chemical Engineering, Lund University.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    Chemical Engineering, Lund University.
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Modeling of soot formation during partial oxidation of producer gas2013In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 106, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soot formation in a reverse-flow partial-oxidation reactor for reforming of gasifier producer gas has been studied. The process was modeled using a detailed reaction mechanism to describe the kinetics of soot formation. The numerical model was validated against experimental data from the literature and showed good agreement with reported data. Nine cases with different gas compositions were simulated in order to study the effects of water, hydrogen and methane content of the gas. The CO and CO2 contents, as well as the tar content of the gas, were also varied to study their effects on soot formation. The results showed that the steam and hydrogen content of the inlet gas had less impact on the soot formation than expected, while the methane content greatly influenced the soot formation. Increasing the CO2 content of the gas reduced the amount of soot formed and gave a higher energy efficiency and methane conversion. In the case of no tar in the incoming gas the soot formation was significantly reduced. It can be concluded that removing the tar in an energy efficient way, prior to the partial oxidation reactor, will greatly reduce the amount of soot formed. Further investigation of tar reduction is needed and experimental research into this process is ongoing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Trondman, Anna-Kari
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Sugita, Shinya
    Tallinn University, Estonia .
    Björkman, Leif
    Viscum pollenanalys & miljöhistoria.
    Greisman, Annica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Tove, Hultberg
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Lagerås, Per
    Swedish National Heritage Board.
    Lindbladh, Matts
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mazier, Florence
    Toulouse University Le Mirail, France.
    Are pollen records from small sites appropriate for REVEALS model-based quantitative reconstructions of past regional vegetation?: An empirical test in southern Sweden2016In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 131-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we test the performance of the Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites (REVEALS) model using pollen records from multiple small sites. We use Holocene pollen records from large and small sites in southern Sweden to identify what is/are the most significant variable(s) affecting the REVEALS-based reconstructions, i.e. type of site (lakes and/or bogs), number of sites, site size, site location in relation to vegetation zones, and/or distance between small sites and large sites. To achieve this objective we grouped the small sites according to (i) the two major modern vegetation zones of the study region, and (ii) the distance between the small sites and large lakes, i.e. small sites within 50, 100, 150, or 200 km of the large lakes. The REVEALS-based reconstructions were performed using 24 pollen taxa. Redundancy analysis was performed on the results from all REVEALS-model runs using the groups within (i) and (ii) separately, and on the results from all runs using the groups within (ii) together. The explanatory power and significance of the variables were identified using forward selection and Monte Carlo permutation tests. The results show that (a) although the REVEALS model was designed for pollen data from large lakes, it also performs well with pollen data from multiple small sites in reconstructing the percentage cover of groups of plant taxa (e.g. open land taxa, summer-green trees, evergreen trees) or individual plant taxa; however, in the case of this study area, the reconstruction of the percentage cover of Calluna vulgaris, Cyperaceae, and Betula may be problematic when using small bogs; (b) standard errors of multiple small-site REVEALS estimates will generally be larger than those obtained using pollen records from large lakes, and they will decrease with increasing size of pollen counts and increasing number of small sites; (c) small lakes are better to use than small bogs if the total number of small sites is low; and (d) the size of small sites and the distance between them do not play a major role, but the distance between the small sites and landscape/vegetation boundaries is a determinant factor for the accuracy of the vegetation reconstructions.

  • 24.
    Wollak, Birte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Forss, Jörgen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Welander, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Evaluation of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) as substrate for biogas production in Kalmar County (Sweden)2018In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 111, p. 96-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is an over-fertilized inland sea; the blue mussels have potential to absorb nutrients as well as being a source of renewable energy in the form of biogas. The aim of this study was to evaluate technology to utilize blue mussels for biogas production in a pilot scale. Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were anaerobically digested in a two-stage digestion process (430 L), consisting of a percolation bed and an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. Frozen mussels with shells were placed in the percolation bed and digestion was performed at 36 oC during 37 days. The methane potential achieved with this technique was 310 L kg-1 volatile solid substances (273.15 K, 101.3 kPa). This result suggests that blue mussels can be efficiently digested in a larger scale and have the potential of contributing to a sustainable energy mix in the Baltic region and at the same time decrease the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea.  No addition of nutrients and no pretreatment of the mussels (peeling) were needed.

  • 25.
    Zhang, Shengrui
    et al.
    Hebei Normal University, China.
    Xu, Qinghai
    Hebei Normal University, China.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Cao, Xianyong
    Hebei Normal University, China ; Research Unit Potsdam, Germany ; University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Li, Jianyong
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Zhang, Liyan
    Shijiazhuang University of Economics, China.
    Li, Yuecong
    Hebei Normal University, China.
    Tian, Fang
    Research Unit Potsdam, Germany ; University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Zhou, Liping
    Peking University, China.
    Lin, Fengyou
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Yang, Xiaolan
    Hebei Institute of Geography Science, China.
    Characteristic pollen source area and vertical pollen dispersal and deposition in a mixed coniferous and deciduous broad-leaved woodland in the Changbai mountains, northeast China.2016In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pollen influx (number of pollen grains cm−2 year−1) can objectively reflect the dispersal and deposition features of pollen within a certain time and space, and is often used as a basis for the quantitative reconstruction of palaeovegetation; however, little is known about the features and mechanisms of vertical dispersal of pollen. Here we present the results from a 5 year (2006–2010) monitoring program using pollen traps placed at different heights from ground level up to 60 m and surface soil samples in a mixed coniferous and deciduous broad-leaved woodland in the Changbai mountains, northeastern China. The pollen percentages and pollen influx from the traps have very similar characteristics to the highest values for Betula,FraxinusQuercus and Pinus, among the tree taxa and Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae and Asteraceae among the herb taxa. Pollen influx values vary significantly with height and show major differences between three distinct layers, above-canopy (≥32 m), within the trunk layer (8 ≤ 32 m) and on the ground (0 m). These differences in pollen influx are explained by differences in (i) the air flows in each of these layers and (ii) the fall speed of pollen of the various taxa. We found that the pollen recorded on the ground surface is a good representation of the major part of the pollen transported in the trunk space of the woodland. Comparison of the pollen influx values with the theoretical, calculated “characteristic pollen source area” (CPSA) of 12 selected taxa indicates that the pollen deposited on the ground surface of the woodland is a fair representation with 85–90 % of the total pollen deposited at a wind speed of 2.4 m s−1 coming from within ca. 1–5 km for Pinus and Quercus, ca. 5–10 km for UlmusTilia, Oleaceae and Betula, ca. 20–40 km for Fraxinus, Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Populus andSalix, and ca. 30–60 km for Artemisia; it is also a good representation with 90–98 % of the total pollen deposited coming from within 60 km at a wind speed of 2.4 m s−1, or 100 km at a wind speed: 6 m s−1, for the 12 selected taxa used in the CPSA calculation. Furthermore, comparison with the vegetation map of the area around the sampling site shows that the pollen deposited on the ground represents all plant communities which grow in the study area within 70 km radius of the sampling site. In this study, the pollen percentages obtained from the soil surface samples are significantly biased towards pollen taxa with good preservation due to thick and robust pollen walls. Therefore, if mosses are available instead, soil samples should be avoided for pollen studies, in particular for the study of pollen-vegetation relationships, the estimation of pollen productivities and quantitative reconstruction of past vegetation. The results also indicate that the existing model of pollen dispersal and deposition, Prentice’s model, provides a fair description of the actual pollen dispersal and deposition in this kind of woodland, which suggests that the application of the landscape reconstruction algorithm would be relevant for reconstruction of this type of woodland in the past.

1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf