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  • 1.
    Harrison, Rodney
    et al.
    University College London, UK.
    DeSilvey, CaitlinUniversity of Exeter, UK.Holtorf, CorneliusLinnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).Macdonald, SharonHumbolt University of Berlin, Germany.Bartolini, NadiaUniversity of Exeter, UK.Breithoff, EstherUniversity of London, UK.Fredheim, HaraldMuseum of London Archaeology, UK;University of Exeter, UK.Lyons, AntonyIndependent.May, SarahSwansea University, UK.Morgan, JennieUniversity of Stirling, UK.Penrose, SefrynIndependent.
    Wollentz, Gustav (Medarbetare/bidragsgivare)
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Heritage Futures: Comparative Approaches to Natural and Cultural Heritage Practices2020Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Preservation of natural and cultural heritage is often said to be something that is done for the future, or on behalf of future generations, but the precise relationship of such practices to the future is rarely reflected upon. Heritage Futures draws on research undertaken over four years by an interdisciplinary, international team of 16 researchers and more than 25 partner organisations to explore the role of heritage and heritage-like practices in building future worlds.

    Engaging broad themes such as diversity, transformation, profusion and uncertainty, Heritage Futures aims to understand how a range of conservation and preservation practices across a number of countries assemble and resource different kinds of futures, and the possibilities that emerge from such collaborative research for alternative approaches to heritage in the Anthropocene. Case studies include the cryopreservation of endangered DNA in frozen zoos, nuclear waste management, seed biobanking, landscape rewilding, social history collecting, space messaging, endangered language documentation, built and natural heritage management, domestic keeping and discarding practices, and world heritage site management.

  • 2.
    Heritage, Alison
    et al.
    ICCROM, Italy.
    Iwasaki, Amy
    ICCROM, Italy.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordiskt centrum för kulturarvspedagogik, Sweden;ICCROM, Italy.
    Anticipating Futures for Heritage: ICCROM Foresight Initiative Horizon Scan Study 20212023Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic Foresight describes a set of approaches, tools and skills that help organizations explore, envision and shape the future. Foresight does not attempt to predict the future per se, but rather seeks to build an awareness of different possible futures for an organization or sector – challenging assumptions and expanding horizons. Conventional strategic planning tends to take a “business-as-usual” approach, extrapolating likely futures from past trends over a short-term horizon. Foresight, by contrast, looks out over a longer horizon – anything from ten to more than 50 years ahead – and engages with change in a more creative way to map out future contexts.

    Through provoking deeper thinking about the nature, drivers and implications of change, Foresight uses the future to help surface critical decisions to take in the present. This helps to strengthen anticipation, enabling organizations to develop more “future proof” forward-thinking strategies, thus building adaptability and resilience.

    In July 2021, as part of its Foresight Initiative, ICCROM launched a horizon scan study to gather intelligence about possible macro-environmental changes that might affect cultural heritage in the future. To undertake this work, the project engaged an interdisciplinary team of 18 researchers and two advisors from different world regions who collectively generated over 60 research reports looking out over a 15-year horizon.

    The study intends to serve as a starting point for an ongoing foresight process to inform the development of ICCROM’s longer-term strategy, and particularly its strategic orientations for the next planning cycle (2026–2031).

    Although the study was primarily for internal purposes, nevertheless in light of the potential usefulness of this approach for other organizations, we decided to publish this report. It is our sincere hope that this may inspire other groups and organizations working in the cultural heritage field to embark upon their own Foresight journey.

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  • 3.
    Horn, Christian
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Kiel University, Germany.
    Who is in charge here?: Material culture, landscapes, and symmetry.2019Ingår i: Past landscapes: The dynamics of interaction between society, landscape, and culture. Human development in landscape / [ed] Annette Haug, Lutz Käppel, Johannes Müller, Leiden: Sidestone Press, 2019, s. 107-129Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study the relationship between human beings, landscapes and ma- terial culture. We review previous research within the post-processual turn and the new material turn, which have moved away from the problematic view that sees material culture solely as acted upon, and the landscape as a passive arena where events take place. However, even though we consider it to be significant that the focus has shifted, we see a danger in viewing the landscape and material culture purely as a visual ideology, a human cognitive construction, which has prevailed in the post-processual turn, as well as seeing landscape and material culture as primary agents on a symmetrical axis with human beings, which prevails in the new material turn. Instead, we would like to move away from these dual categories by focusing on a dialectic relation based on the transmission of stories and human engagement with material culture and landscapes. Here, we apply memory studies with a particular focus on how activities and habits in the landscape shape and enforce memories, as well as how the landscape and material culture can form chronotopes, narratives combining spatial and temporal dimensions, which in turn motivate and influence human activities. Our case studies to make this point are gathered from Bronze Age rock art in Scandinavia as well as from war monuments in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our primary argument is a fluid (opposed to static), multi-temporal approach to landscape and material culture, where the events taking place are to be traced in both spatial and temporal directions. However, it is important to note that the landscape does not store memories and it does not freeze events. It is solely through human engagement, activities, and reflexion that the landscape and material culture form narratives that are carried on in an ever-changing, multiple and highly context-dependent way into the future, by constraining the variety of possible per- ceptions and streamlining experiences.

  • 4.
    Horn, Christian
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wollentz, GustavNordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.Di Maida, GianpieroNeanderthal Museum.Haug, AnnetteChristian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Germany.
    Places of memory: spatialised practices of remembrance from prehistory to today2020Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Places of Memory takes a new look at spatialised practices of remembrance and its role in reshaping societies from prehistory to today, gathering researchers representing diverse but complementary fields of expertise. This diachronic outlook provides important insights into the great variety of human and social reactions examining memory, encompassing aspects of remembering, the loss of memory, reclaiming memories, and remembering things that may not have happened. The contributions to this volume expand upon Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux des memoire (places of memory) and the notion that memory is not just stored in these places but activated through human engagement. The volume presents a reflection on the creation of memories through the organisation and use of landscapes and spaces that explicitly considers the multiplicity of meanings of the past. Thus, social identities were created, reaffirmed, strengthened, and transformed through the founding, change, and reorganization of places and spaces of memory in the cultural landscape.

  • 5.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV). University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV). Flinders University, Australia.
    May, Sarah
    University College London, UK.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Kiel University, Germany.
    No future in archaeological heritage management?2017Ingår i: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 49, nr 5, s. 639-647Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the future is mentioned frequently in overarching aims and visions, and it is a major drive in the daily work of archaeological heritage managers and indeed heritage professionals more generally, it remains unclear precisely how an overall commitment to the future can best inform specific heritage practices. It seems that most archaeologists and other heritage professionals cannot easily express how they conceive of the future they work for, and how their work will impact on that future. The future tends to remain implicit in daily practice which operates in a continuing, rolling present. The authors argue that this needs to change because present-day heritage management may be much less beneficial for the future than we commonly expect.

  • 6.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordiskt centrum för kulturarvspedagogik, Sweden.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Framtidsmedvetande på museer: Några svenska länsmuseer i fokus2022Ingår i: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 5-22Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how managers and employees at County Museums in Sweden think about, work with, and relate to the future in their daily practice. We examined which tools and routines the museums employ to work concretely with different future perspectives. The study is thus about those forms of future consciousness that exist in the museums. The results show that the future is implicitly present but often remains unarticulated in the work of the museum. The museums work with short future perspectives which are often linked to concrete tasks or development work. The future perspectives at the museums are largely locked in the present or in a near future. Concrete tools, skills and routines to develop future consciousness are lacking. However, the results show that there is great interest and willingness among Swedish County Museums to implement tools, skills, and routines for a more developed engagement with futures.

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  • 7.
    Jonsson Malm, Carolina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nord Ctr Heritage Learning & Creat, Sweden.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    The difficult heritage of Sandby borg - exploring memories, ideas and narratives of a 1500 year old massacre2022Ingår i: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 28, nr 11-12, s. 1271-1285Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Kuhlefelt, Helena
    et al.
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity (NCK), Sweden.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity (NCK), Sweden.
    Professionalising volunteer management in museums and archives. Reflections from NCK2022Ingår i: Nordic Figurations of Volunteering / [ed] Tine Fristrup, Östersund: Jamtli förlag , 2022, s. 215-228Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity (NCK) has been  working with the subject of volunteers and volunteer management for over  a decade in close collaboration with other partners, of which many are contributors  to this volume. But why does a research and development centre  for heritage learning interest itself in volunteer management and leadership?  In this essay, we will reflect on the question through a historical overview  of some of the ways in which NCK has engaged in the professionalization  of the Nordic heritage sector, and through looking ahead. As we have seen  that dialogue is a powerful tool for engaging in the heterogeneous subject  of volunteer management and leadership in the heritage sector, this essay  will focus on some of the intricate questions that are guiding our work on  the topic, rather than providing clear-cut answers.

  • 9.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, KV.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, KV.
    Möte med en storhög2012Ingår i: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, Vol. 2, s. 24-25Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 10. Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    et al.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Risinge hög: Delundersökning av en storhög på Öland2016Ingår i: Forntid längs ostkusten 4: Blankaholmsseminariet år 2012-2014 / [ed] Kenneth Alexandersson, Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay, Västervik: Västerviks museum i samarbete med Tjustbygdens kulturhistoriska förening och Studiefrämjandet , 2016, s. 111-139Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Sonne, Lasse
    et al.
    University of South-Eastern, Norway .
    Hansen, Anna
    Culture in Landskrona municipality, Sweden.
    Banik, Vibeke Kieding
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Djupdræt, Martin Brandt
    Den Gamle By, Denmark.
    Development, Test, and Evaluation of New Continuing Education for Museum Staff in Scandinavia2023Ingår i: New Challenges – New Learning –New Possibilities: Proceedings from the 9th Nordic Conferenceon Adult Education and Learning / [ed] Johan Lövgren, Lasse Sonne, Michael Noah Weiss, Wien: LIT Verlag, 2023, s. 139-161Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Nordplus Adult development project Increased Learning Through Social Spaces (2018-2022) we collected examples of social interactions  at cultural heritage organisations in Scandinavia which contributed to interactivity  and learning. In addition, we analysed how cultural heritage  organisations actively create social spaces with the intention of promoting  learning opportunities and how they evaluate these learning opportunities.  Based on the examples, we developed a hypothesis on how various  elements can create social interactivity and learning. By departing from  research literature such as museum studies (Falk & Dierking, 2013) and  lifelong learning (Jarvis, 2017), combined with the British planning and  evaluation tool Generic Learning Outcomes (Graham, 2013) and a methodological  approach departing from action research (Torbert, 2004; Ulvik  et al., 2022), we developed a foundation for a new continuing education  programme for museum staff on learning through social spaces. This programme  was developed during the project period and tested and evaluated  in September 2021 in Östersund, Sweden, on Scandinavian museum staff.  In this chapter, we analyse the development of the continuing education  for museum staff in Scandinavia and present the test and evaluation  results. The evaluation programme consisted of an electronic survey distributed  to the course participants before and after the course, as well as  observations during the course, discussions with the participants during  the course and a concluding evaluation based on the Generic Learning  Outcomes evaluation tool. By departing from educational practice, the  Scandinavian research group will implicitly seek to answer the symposia  question related to what the societal challenges are and how these looks  like from the perspective of heritage institutions. The research group will  seek to answer the question related to what possibilities that are generated  for heritage institutions. Finally, the group answers the question of how  adult education and learning related to heritage institutions might develop  because of these challenges and possibilities by, for example, engaging in  new professional development or through the development of new professions related to cultural heritage organisations.

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  • 12.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    An Archaeology of Reclaiming Memories – Possibilities and Pitfalls2020Ingår i: Places of Memory: Spatialised Practices of Remembrance from Prehistory to Today / [ed] Horn, Christian; Wollentz, Gustav; Di Maida, Gianpiero; Haug, Annette, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2020, s. 150-158Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    When archaeologists or other professionals engaging with heritage are discussing their purpose in society, it has become increasingly common to do so under the imperative that they can help reclaim memories and, in some way, give voices back to those who have been silenced in history. Within this process, archaeologists are particularly well-placed to uncover these memories because they mainly work with material that has been neglected and discarded, the mundane aspects of everyday life. This is especially poignant in the case of historical or contemporary archaeology since the memories ‘uncovered’ may be remembered by people still alive today, but, as I will present later, it may also be valid for prehistoric archaeology. This approach hopes to reinforce the relevance of archaeology, as a discipline, by recognizing its ethical4 and political5 implications. Through pluralizing voices and perspectives within and upon the past,6 archaeology thus becomes a tool for democratization in society.

    However, while I find an archaeology of reclaiming memories both important and necessary, I have also identified a set of pitfalls and assumptions that will be elaborated upon in this argumentative paper. This paper is written as a critical discussion paper in which I begin by outlining what I deem to form the main possibilities in an archaeology of reclaiming memories. Thereafter, I will outline three pitfalls and their underlying assumptions. Finally, I will summarize the argument and provide some suggestions.

  • 13.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    The Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Conflicted memorials and the need to look forward. The interplay between remembering and forgetting in Mostar and on the Kosovo Field2019Ingår i: Memorials in the Aftermath of Armed Conflict: From History to Heritage / [ed] Marie Louise Stig Sørensen; Dacia Viejo-Rose; Paola Filippucci, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, s. 159-182Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter studies the interplay between remembering and forgetting in post-war contexts. Since memory has spatial dimensions and can be stimulated by visual clues, it is clear that memorials may play a highly important role within such processes. Fieldwork carried out in Mostar, Bosnia Herzegovina, and on the Kosovo Field between 2015 and 2016, in the aftermath of the ethno-religious wars that touched both these regions during the 1990s, helps to illuminate the negotiation. On the basis of the fieldwork carried out, this chapter aims to challenge routinely made assumptions about positive and negative valuations of remembering and forgetting.

  • 14.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordiskt Centrum för Kulturarvspedagogik, Sweden.
    Digital Pedagogy at Museums for Increased Participation and Co-creation: A Handbook for Museum Professionals2023Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is directed toward museum professionals who want to expand and innovate their work in outreach through digital means. Learning, participation, and co-creation are central concepts in the book. The book is relevant for people holding different capacities at the museum: especially museum educators, exhibition producers, communicators, and museum directors. This does not mean that only museum professionals would find the book useful. What works in a museum context can often be adjusted to other contexts as well. Everyone is welcome to read the book and hopefully find inspiration and new perspectives. 

    The purpose of the book is to provide food for thought in how to work with digital tools in outreach, and on occasion, to challenge old ways of working and thinking[LR1]  in museums. It is most often the capacity to imagine how to do things differently, rather than the limitations of the technology per se, that poses the greatest challenge to museums in an increasingly digital, or even postdigital, society. Focus will primarily be on how digital technology can help museum professionals stimulate active participation and co-creation with an audience. We do not only address completely online pedagogical programs, but we are also looking at how the digital can enhance the outcome and offer a new pedagogy in the museum – a (post)digital pedagogy.

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  • 15.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordiskt Centrum för Kulturarvspedagogik (NCK).
    Hur framtidsmedvetna är svenska länsmuseer?2021Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents results from a study conducted by the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity (NCK) in the spring of 2021 on behalf of Linnaeus University's UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures. The study is a continuation of an examination conducted in 2012 and 2013 in, among other things, the Swedish heritage sector, where a need for increased future awareness was identified. Based on the identified need, this study focuses on how county museums in Sweden can work towards a more developed future awareness. We examine what routines and tools already exist in the workplace to approach the future, or which routines and tools they express a need for. The results from the examination are presented in two formats: partly in the form of an article (publication is being prepared), partly in the form of this report which focuses on the need for new tools and routines that the interviewees express.

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  • 16.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity (NCK), Sweden.
    Increasing future awareness in the cultural heritage sector using the SoPHIA model2023Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents results from a project that aims at increasing future awareness in the cultural heritage sector, using the SoPHIA model. The project was run by the Centre for Applied Heritage at Linnaeus University, with funding from the university. Work on the report was carried out in2021 and 2022 by NCK (The Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity AB) under the direction of Gustav Wollentz, in co-operation with Kalmar County Museum, Jamtli Museum, andDaniel Laven from the Department of Economics, Geography, Law and Tourism at Mid  Sweden University. Results from the project show that the model succeeded in exploring possible future effects of a heritage intervention, defined as any action that results in a physical change to an element of a historic place, and related these effects to prioritized issues for societal development, such as participation, inclusion, and wellbeing. It managed to expand the range of potential action in the present. Furthermore, it also provided a useful tool for identifying significant areas where there is the potential to think more innovatively and creatively regarding future change and effects. The model helped in identifying the necessary steps and actions needed for realizing the interventionin accordance with a desirable scenario. The model failed in anticipating long-term futures or futures radically different from the present. It mostly provided insights into how the intervention could have an impact upon future change, but not on how future change would have an impact upon the intervention. Ways of adapting the model for increased future awareness are suggested.These include ways to make the model more suitable for anticipating long-term futures as well as futures of radical change. 

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  • 17.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Landscapes of Difficult Heritage2020Bok (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This book studies how people negotiate difficult heritage within their everyday lives, focusing on memory, belonging, and identity. The starting point for the examination is that temporalities lie at the core of understanding this negotiation and that the connection between temporalities and difficult heritage remains poorly understood and theorized in previous research. In order to fully explore the temporalities of difficult heritage, the book investigates places in which the incident of violence originated within different time periods. It examines one example of modern violence (Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina), one example of where the associated incident occurred during medieval times (the Gazimestan monument in Kosovo), and one example of prehistoric violence (Sandby borg in Sweden). The book presents new theoretical perspectives and provides suggestions for developing sites of difficult heritage, and will thus be relevant for academic researchers, students, and heritage professionals.   

  • 18.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Kiel University, Germany.
    Making a home in Mostar: heritage and the temporalities of belonging2017Ingår i: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 23, nr 10, s. 928-945Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the feeling of being at home in time and in place through fieldwork carried out in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina from 2015–2016. Such feelings are needed after a war resulting in geographical displacement as occurred during the breakup of Yugoslavia. This paper argues for the need to see beyond only spatial factors for the ‘making of home’, and therefore considers temporal factors through the role of the heritage in forming narratives, which combine temporal and spatial relations. Alternative narratives to those of ethnic separation are taken into consideration, and it is argued that a sole focus on division may further enforce it rather than lead to its reduction. A sense of disassociation to the current city of Mostar and its narratives has led to the construction of narratives of home within a different time-period (pre-war Mostar). In turn, this may cause nostalgia, passivity, and an ‘othering’ of the newcomers to Mostar. However, there are also cases of employing such a narrative actively in order to envision an alternative future beyond ethnic separation. So far, the institutions working with the heritage of Mostar have not addressed these issues, thus possible ways forward are suggested.

  • 19.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Kiel University, Germany.
    Prehistoric Violence as Difficult Heritage: Sandby Borg: A Place of Avoidance and Belonging2017Ingår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 199-226Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an increased focus on heritage connected to violence within archaeological research projects, there has been no proper focus on the rediscovery of prehistoric massacres, from the perspective of diffi- cult heritage. Most likely, the temporal distance in- volved has led to the assumption that such research is superfluous. The ongoing excavations of an Iron Age massacre in the ring fort of Sandby Borg, on Öland, Sweden, challenges the validity of such an a priori assumption. This paper focuses on Sandby Borg through interviews conducted with the local population who grew up near the ring fort. The interviews reveal how new narratives and relations to the past have been created through the discovery. The results call for us to move away from a linear and chronological understanding of difficult heri- tage, in which time is approached as gradually ‘purifying’ difficult heritage, towards understand- ing ‘dissonance’ as inherent in each site of heritage, which can be used as a resource.

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  • 20.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    The Cultural Heritage as a Resource in Conflict Resolution – Possibilities and challenges2020Ingår i: Cadernos do LEPAARQ (UFPEL), ISSN 1806-9118, Vol. 17, nr 34, s. 74-90Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this article is to present some of the ways in which the cultural heritage can be used in conflict resolution and to which results, as well as to outline challenges. My method has been to read previous research concerning how the cultural heritage can be used in conflict resolution. I have also read the reports and articles available from the projects that I have deemed relevant. I have studied research projects, global organizations as well as smaller and more regional NGOs. This study shows that there are many ways in which the cultural heritage can be used as a resource in conflict resolution. However, for it to work one need also be aware of the various ways in which it can be misused. If those for whom a project is created are considered passive targets of a particular message concerning the past, the risk of losing control of that message will increase. The various meanings of the past as well as the people targeted, are not static but constantly in movement. I therefore argue that a process- oriented approach, preferably through dialogue and participation, would be a way to avoid a static presentation. This method could try to present history from as many perspectives as possible and begin with a focus on the local places and consider the inherently intangible aspects of heritage, to make it relatable, and from there highlight wider issues. Furthermore, the people planning it must be ready to get their own opinions about the heritage challenged by different perceptions, and in so doing, the inherently dissonant aspects of heritage should be seen as a resource rather than as a disturbance. 

  • 21.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, KV.
    To be buried inside a long-forgotten world: Studying the reuse of passage graves wearing "Bronze Age glasses"2012Ingår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, s. 169-202Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The theories presented about the reuse of Neolithic monuments during the Bronze Age in Scandinavia are mainly universal, i.e. applicable to all periods during prehistory. I argue that there is no point in isolating reuse as something separate from society. The focus of my study is the Mysinge passage grave on the is- land of Öland. I have also studied the reuse of other graves on Öland and of passage graves in Falbygden. I propose that the passage grave was linked to the un- derworld and that some of those buried in the cham- ber of Mysinge during the Bronze Age were people travelling by sea.

  • 22.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Kiel University, Germany.
    Barišić, Marko
    University of Kent, UK.
    Sammar, Nourah
    Birzeit University, Palestine.
    Youth activism and dignity in post-war Mostar: envisioning a shared future through heritage2019Ingår i: Space & Polity, ISSN 1356-2576, E-ISSN 1470-1235, Vol. 23, nr 2, s. 197-215Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at youth activism in Mostar through a specific action occurring in 2016, when an electric substation was overpainted in the neighbourhood of Rudnik. The project highlighted the rights of the miners to emphasize that other than ethnic identities can be brought forward through cultural heritage. The paper aims to broaden the spectrum of heritage values to encompass the concept of dignity. The monument served to induce a sense of dignity on two levels. Firstly, people were given the agency to influence the monument. Secondly, the monument emphasized workers’ identity, which is currently silenced in the public space.

  • 23.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Nordiskt centrum för kulturarvspedagogik, Sweden.
    Brandt Djupdræt, MartinDen Gamle By i Aarhus, Denmark.Hansen, AnnaRegionmuseet Skåne, Sweden.Sonne, LasseUniversity of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Museet som ett socialt rum och en plats för lärande2021Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur skapas rum på museer som uppmuntrar till och stimulerar social interaktion? Vad lär sig en besökare via den sociala interaktionen? Vilka metoder kan användas för utvärdera sociala rum och de effekter som kan uppnås med en socialt stimulerande miljö? I projektet Increased Learning Through Social Spaces, som finansierats av Nordplus Adult under 2018-2021, har partners från Sverige, Norge och Danmark undersökt just de sociala dimensionera av museiupplevelsen i met detalj, och i den här volymen presenterar vi några av de resultat som vi har kommit fram till. I projektet har vi undersökt hur man skapar, använder och utvärderar sociala rum på museer, och vi har genomfört en rad undersökningar på museer i Sverige, Norge och Danmark där vi har samlat in ett empiriskt material som vi utgåt ifrån i våra analyser och reflektioner. projektet leds ac Regionmuseet Skåne, och övriga projektpartners är Den Gamle By, Nordiskt Centrum för Kulturarvspedagogik och Universitetet i sydöstra Norge. Denna bok bör ses som inspirerande material för alla som vill arbeta med detta ämne.

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  • 24.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Nordiskt centrum för kulturarvspedagogik, Sweden.
    Djupdræt, Martin Brandt
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Hansen, Anna
    Landskrona municipality, Sweden.
    Sonne, Lasse
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Banik, Vibeke Kieding
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    The museum as a social space and a place for lifelong learning2023Ingår i: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 23-42Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the social dimensions of the museum by focusing on two questions: 1) What elements in museums have proved successful in creating socially interactive environments? 2) Does social interaction stimulate learning in museums and if so: how? We argue that museums are fundamentally social spaces, which are often appreciated and used as spaces to be social, but also that there is a lack of research and knowledge on how museums act as social spaces in particular, and what kind of learning social interaction in museums stimulate. We are applying the tool Generic Learning Outcomes to approach these questions. By mapping and analysing 30 museum spaces and evaluating 25 activities in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, we have managed to identify a set of elements useful for making museum spaces more social. We have also been able to trace a connection between social interaction in museums and how the museum experience contributes to learning.

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  • 25.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Kuhlefelt, Helena
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Heritage as a process of connecting: Pluralism and diversity in Nordic and Baltic museums2021Ingår i: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 554-569Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how the concepts of pluralism and diversity are filled with meaning through specific practices and attitudes in museums in Nordic and Baltic countries, through a method of both a widespread quantitative questionnaire sent to ca 750 museums in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Estonia, as well as through qualitative semi-structured interviews with a selection of key-individuals. The paper frames the analysis around seeing heritage as a process of connecting where focus is placed upon the concepts of care and belonging. The paper identifies that the current speed of the museum hinders the process of reaching and connecting to a diverse audience, where a relationship based on mutual trust can be sustained over a long period of time. Furthermore, it identifies the need for a shared understanding within the sector as to what concepts such as integration and diversity mean and how it can be approached through practices in the museum. Finally, the paper recognises that the sector itself has to become more diverse in order to reach out to a plural society.

  • 26.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV). Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Kuhlefelt, Helena
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Eriksson-Bergström, Sofia
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Lundström, Catarina
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    Tegnhed, Eva
    Eva Tegnhed, The Association Archives of Jämtland, Sweden.
    Jensen, Bente
    Bente Jensen, Aalborg City Archives, Denmark.
    Vøien, Jon Are
    Jon Are Vøien, the National Archives of Norway, Norway.
    Anntila, Vesa
    the National Archives of Finland, Finland.
    Østigård, Astrid Morkemo
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Volunteering at Archives - a mapping of volunteer management at archives in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden2024Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This report constitutes a first attempt to map volunteer management practices in the  Nordic archives sector, that is, in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland. We have  unfortunately not been able to include Iceland in this study, but it would be relevant  to include in future studies. This has been done through a survey broadly distributed  within the archive sector, as well as additional in-depth follow-up interviews. The  main purposes have been to achieve a better understanding of how and to what  extent archives in Scandinavia engage with volunteers, different attitudes towards  volunteer work and what it entails, and perhaps most importantly, identify needs  within the archive sector in the purpose of developing educational material and other  types of useful resources. We have also been examining the reasons why some  archives have not started working with volunteers, and what would be required to  help these archives take the first step in case of expressed interest. Through the  results, some comparisons between countries can be made. However, it is important  to highlight that, while we received 121 answers to the survey (Denmark: 33, Finland:  21, Norway: 44, Sweden: 23), there were of course many archives who did not  answer. Comparisons and analysis need to be made carefully, and certain  interpretations will be tentative in nature. This is a first attempt at mapping the  volunteer landscape at archives in Nordic countries, and we hope it can serve as an  inspiration and basis for further research.

  • 27.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity, Sweden.
    May, Sarah
    Swansea University, UK.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Toxic heritage: Uncertain and unsafe2020Ingår i: Heritage Futures: Comparative Approaches to Natural and Cultural Heritage Practices / [ed] Rodney Harrison, Caitlin DeSilvey, Cornelius Holtorf, Sharon Macdonald, Nadia Bartolini, Esther Breithoff, Harald Fredheim, Antony Lyons, Sarah May, Jennie Morgan, Sefryn Penrose, London: UCL Press, 2020, s. 294-312Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 28.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    et al.
    Kiel University, Germany.
    Ribeiro, Artur
    Kiel University, Germany.
    Ethics in the Practice of Archaeology and the Making of Heritage: Understanding beyond the Material2020Ingår i: Past Societies: Human Development in Landscapes / [ed] Müller, Johannes; Ricci, Andrea, Leiden: Sidestone Press, 2020, s. 191-202Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most popular current trends in archaeology and heritage studies is New Materialisms. This trend has shifted the attention of scholars from a human and sub- ject centred perspective of reality, to one focusing on objects in-themselves and the complex networks in which these objects navigate. Despite the interesting research that New Materialisms has generated, this trend has done little to engage in political and ethical critique, largely due to two central tenets of New Materialisms: that of distributed agency and essentialism.

    With regards to agency, according to New Materialisms, it is argued that agency is distributed across a network of both humans and non-human objects, all mutually affecting each other. As pointed out by some critics, this conception of agency leads to problems concerning how we can ascertain responsibility, especially in sensitive contexts such as war contexts or political corruption. The risk of essentialism, on the other hand, is that it may recognise objects in-themselves, such as monuments, as containing within themselves aspects like beauty and inspiration, that in turn make them ‘heritage’. However, recognising heritage as inherent hides the (seldom innocent) negotiation that makes heritage ‘heritage’. This negotiation includes silences that are not valued as heritage and it is often built upon unequal power relations.

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate through the Gazimestan monument in Kosovo that both the idea of distributed agency and essentialism obscure complex problems when it comes to recognising responsibility for how heritage is recognised and managed in post-war environments. Rather than distributed agency and essen- tialism, this paper argues for the acceptance of heritage as a meaning-making process, where value associated with heritage is constantly negotiated.

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