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  • 1.
    Gunnarsson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Kalmar County Museum, Sweden.
    Archaeological Challenges, Digital Possibilities: Digital Knowledge Development and Communication in Contract Archaeology2018Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research concerns the digitalisation of archaeology, with a focus on Swedish contract archaeology. The aim is to understand how the archaeological discipline relates to the change that digitalisation brings and human involvement in these processes. The thesis is a study of its impact on processes connected to archaeological knowledge production and communication. The work problematises how digital data might be understood within these contexts but also illustrates where the potential of the digitalisation lies and how archaeology can make use of it. The theoretical approach re-actualises the concept of reflexivity in a digital context, combining it with various communication theories aiming to challenge the archaeological workflow and connect it more closely to present-day society. The digitalisation of archaeology can be seen across the whole discipline withan emphasis on academia. This digital development has greater opportunities in larger research projects which have sufficient funding than in contract archaeology. In those projects leading the digital development, the reflexive approach has been re-discovered and the digital enabled for new processes of knowledge production to take place. In case studies of Swedish contract archaeology several observations are made where it becomes clear that the digitalisation already shows positive effects at a government level, in organisations and projects within the sector. But there are also issues regarding digital infrastructure, knowledge production, archiving, accessibility and transparency. The biggest challenge is not technical but in attitudes towards digitalisation. The research concludes that digital communication based on archaeological source material can be something more than mediation of results. With digital interactive storytelling there are ways to create emotional virtual connections with the user, relating to the present and the surrounding society. By interlinking the processes of interpretation and communication an archaeological knowledge production might become an archaeological knowledge development.

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    Doctoral Thesis (Fulltext)
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    Front Page
  • 2.
    Gunnarsson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Kalmar läns museum, Sweden.
    Det digitala uppdraget: Om uppdragsarkeologins möjligheter att skapa relevant kunskap i ett digitalt samhälle2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work is to shed new light on the conditions under which knowledgeproduction in Swedish contract archaeology is realised, within a digitalised system.The purpose is to build a platform to further develop the system, with the aim ofmaking contract archaeology more relevant for society.

    This study uses Science and Technology Studies as a theoretical framework forstudying the archaeological practice as a scientific process, in which knowledge isassumed to be created in a sociotechnical context, rather than discovered. A casestudy based on 18 interviews with 34 informants representing archaeologicalinvestigators, County Administration Boards and the National Heritage Board hasbeen conducted to highlight the sociotechnical aspects of knowledge production.

    This study investigates the sociotechnical conditions for building relevantknowledge for government agencies, researchers, and the public, and how the digitalinfrastructure and social aspects of knowledge production affect the kind ofknowledge that is produced. The results are used to produce suggestions for adeveloped archaeological practice in contract archaeology and to show how such apractice may be approached.

    The results show that there is a great potential in digital practice, but that theframework for tapping this potential does not yet exist. The study reveals that thecurrent digital information infrastructure and the social relations betweenknowledge producers limit successful knowledge development.

    My research proposes several changes in the system in order to advance towards adigital infrastructure for archaeological knowledge that challenges the focus oninformation. By gathering archaeological documentation in one place, regulatingdigital practices, and working closely with the target groups of contract archaeology,more relevant knowledge production for society can be attained.

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    Det digitala uppdraget
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    Presentationsfil
  • 3.
    Rodriguez-Varela, Ricardo
    et al.
    Centre for Palaeogenetics, Sweden;Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Moore, Kristjan H. S.
    deCODE Genet AMGEN Inc, Iceland.
    Ebenesersdottir, S. Sunna
    deCODE Genet AMGEN Inc, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Kilinc, Gulsah Merve
    Hacettepe Univ, Türkiye.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    Bohusläns Museum, Sweden.
    Berglund, Birgitta
    NTNU Univ Museum, Norway.
    Alrawi, Loey
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kashuba, Natalija
    Stockholm University, Sweden;Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lagerholm, Vendela Kempe
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gilbert, Edmund
    RCSI, Ireland.
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    RCSI, Ireland.
    Hovig, Eivind
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway;University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hansen, Thomas F.
    Copenhagen Mental Health Services, Denmark;Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Werge, Thomas
    Copenhagen Mental Health Services, Denmark;University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Munters, Arielle R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skar, Birgitte
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Christophersen, Axel
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Turner-Walker, Gordon
    National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan.
    Gopalakrishnan, Shyam
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Daskalaki, Eva
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Perez-Ramallo, Patxi
    Max Planck Institute for Geoanthropology, Germany.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Francis Crick Institute, UK.
    Girdland-Flink, Linus
    University of Aberdeen, UK;Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
    Gunnarsson, Fredrik
    Kalmar County Museum, Sweden.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark;Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Einarsson, Lars
    Kalmar County Museum, Sweden.
    Victor, Helena
    Kalmar County Museum, Sweden.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    County Museum of Uppland, Sweden.
    Stora, Jan
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Stefansson, Kari
    deCODE Genet AMGEN Inc, Iceland.
    Helgason, Agnar
    deCODE Genet AMGEN Inc, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The genetic history of Scandinavia from the Roman Iron Age to the present2023In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 186, no 1, p. 32-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate a 2,000-year genetic transect through Scandinavia spanning the Iron Age to the present, based on 48 new and 249 published ancient genomes and genotypes from 16,638 modern individuals. We find regional variation in the timing and magnitude of gene flow from three sources: the eastern Baltic, the British-Irish Isles, and southern Europe. British-Irish ancestry was widespread in Scandinavia from the Viking period, whereas eastern Baltic ancestry is more localized to Gotland and central Sweden. In some regions, a drop in current levels of external ancestry suggests that ancient immigrants contributed proportionately less to the modern Scandinavian gene pool than indicated by the ancestry of genomes from the Viking and Medieval periods. Finally, we show that a north-south genetic cline that characterizes modern Scandinavians is mainly due to the differential levels of Uralic ancestry and that this cline existed in the Viking Age and possibly earlier.

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