lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    Bohusläns museum, Sweden.
    Dutra Leivas, Ivonne
    Kalmar läns museum, Sweden.
    Eboskog, Mikael
    Bohusläns museum, Sweden.
    Engström, Elin
    Stiftelsen Kulturmiljövård, Sweden.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Jamtli, Sweden.
    Knutson, Charina
    Jamtli, Sweden.
    Smits, Vivian
    Västsvensk Konservering, Sweden.
    Svedin, Maria
    Stiftelsen Kulturmiljövård, Sweden.
    Söderström, Ulrika
    Kalmar läns museum, Sweden.
    Uppdragsarkeologiska möjligheter: Nya sätt att tänka om en samtidsverksamhet i en framtidsbransch2021In: In Situ Archaeologica, ISSN 2000-4044, Vol. 15, p. 5-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this text we discuss how Swedish contract archaeology can develop its social engagement by creating new areas of relevance to society, beyond the general activities of disseminating results. We do so by giving concrete examples of how this can be done, using archaeological excavations as a starting point. The examples include engaging the local community in future planning for a social sustainable living environment, collaboration with the tourism sector, development of teaching materials for secondary schools, memory training for people with acquired brain damage, and school programs focusing on a socially sustainable and inclusive society. The purpose of the text is to inspire change, by showing development opportunities for future contract archaeology that will benefit both performers and recipients, and contribute to society’s multifaceted needs. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext (pdf)
  • 2.
    Smits, Vivian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Studio Västsvensk Konservering, Sweden.
    Att skapa ett kulturarv2019Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at improving cooperation and communication between actors in the field of Swedish contract archaeology in order to maximize the benefits of their work. It addresses two research questions: How did the development of archaeology into contract archaeology as an independent business affect museum collections in Sweden? And: How do communication and terminology affect the processes that transform material culture into cultural heritage?

    Departing from “actor-network-theory” and taking a linguistic perspective, I first examine closely some important processes and structures behind the making of heritage. The background of contemporary contract archaeology is then illuminated through a literature study focusing on the history of and current practices in contract archaeology, conservation practice and museum management. Later, I investigate the particular effects of contract archaeology on museum collections. This is based in part on a comparative analysis of selection and de-selection processes of artefacts in collections and partly on a survey among contract archaeologists. I conclude with a discourse analysis of policies and other governing documents, highlighting the significance of communication and terminology in processes during which archaeological artefacts acquire a new identity as cultural heritage.

    The study shows how the contemporary system of contract archaeology creates a biased representation of (pre-)history, as selection and de-selection processes of artefacts in museum collections are affected by various internal practices and external demands that ultimately shape cultural heritage. This bias is not helped by the fact that those collecting the artefacts in the field use different terminology compared with those collecting in museums. I argue that behind this gap lies the “cultural heritage paradox” which derives from different understandings and aims of cultural heritage by different actors. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Licentiate Thesis (Fulltext)
    Download (jpg)
    Front Page
  • 3.
    Smits, Vivian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Förvaltningen för kulturutveckling - Studio Västsvensk Konservering, Sweden.
    Kulturarvsparadoxen: Om uppdragsarkeologin och kulturarvets användning i samtiden2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the explicit assignment of creating relevant knowledge of significance,Swedish contract archaeology lies at the fore of a research-based archaeology. Butwhat is “relevant knowledge”? And how is it “of significance” for society? Againstthe background of the relation between cultural politics, Contract Archaeology andthe museums, this thesis investigates the making of archaeological heritage inmuseum collections in Sweden by means of Contract Archaeology. The overall aimof the study is to elucidate obstacles in the current system of heritage making inorder to improve the relevance of its results for society as a whole.In the thesis a contraposition between scientific and political goals within thepractice of heritage making is identified lying at the core of several inconsistencies,challenging the relevance and significance of Contract Archaeology and its heritageproducts. I propose to call this specific challenge “the Cultural Heritage Paradox”.The Paradox is built upon issues relating to structure, interpretation, andpracticability. In order for Cultural Heritage produced by Contract Archaeology togain significance for society, the Paradox needs to be resolved.It is argued that, whereas “significance” is obtained in a multitude of valueperspectives, “relevant knowledge” is more than scientific value and the teaching ofthe public about the past. As such, it is suggested that Contract Archaeology needsto adopt a social stance as the core for its operation, with an extended cooperationbetween regional authorities, Contract Archaeology and Museums as a prerequisitefor creating relevant knowledge of significance. A wider cooperation will secure anintegration of a multitude of value perspectives in the process of making heritage.This postulates a shared understanding of the content and meaning ofarchaeological heritage, founded in a perception of Contract Archaeology as beingmore than knowledge

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kulturarvsparadoxen
    Download full text (pdf)
    Errata
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 4.
    Smits, Vivian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Making Heritage: A Case Study on the Impact of Contract Archaeology on Museum Collecting in Sweden2020In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 28, p. 279-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since taking off as an industry in Sweden in the 1980s, contract archaeology has changed not only the role of field archaeologists but also that of museums and the formation of collections. This paper discusses some of the effects of the commercialization of archaeological  services through a case study of past and present collection practices. Data records are compared from three different archaeological investigations at the site Nya Lödöse (1473–1621) in Gothenburg. Each excavation represents a particular era in archaeological practice. The data are used to compare and analyse collecting practices within contemporary contract archaeology. Separately, a survey among contract archaeology units examines the implementation of legislative guidelines and day-to-day practices and suggests several causes for anomalies in the selection and discarding of finds in the case study. Combined, the findings of the case study and the survey results suggest that contract archaeology leaves a specific imprint on collections in archaeological museums, impacting their compilation and therefore influencing future research as well as the experience of the public.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf